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NYT: Apple expected to release Siri-powered television by 2013 - Page 2

post #41 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

So, here's a question why would I possibly want this?

I consider my TV to be nothing other than a large monitor. I get inputs from a cable box, PS3 and an Apple TV. I can add new inputs, or remove old ones.

Simply put, I don't believe this rumour for a second.

Folks, I've written about my professional musician wife before. This pretty much really happened:

Wife: I just bought Netflix.
Me: Oh. (Thinking: Don't we have cable?)
Wife: Yes, now I can watch movies on my MacBook and iMac.
Me: Ok.
...Time Passes...
Wife: Can we hook this to the TV in the bedroom? (Nice little 32" flatscreen.)
Me: Yes. (Off to Apple store to buy adapter to hook to PC input on TV.)
Wife: Cool. But what are all those cables going to the TV?
Me: Well, we need those to get the signal to the TV from the MacBookPro.
...Time Passes...
Me: Dear, did you say that was Netflix? (Yep. I listen really well...)
Wife: Yes.
Me: Uh, the AppleTV in the living room can receive Netflix.
Wife: Well, bring it in here.
Me: (Being an engineer I start to get wires and power cables to run it all nice an neat behind the entertainment center.)
Wife: Can you hurry?
Me: I am hurrying.
Wife: Just grabs the whole mess and sets the AppleTV cables and all on the side of the entertainment center.)
Me: (That's really ugly.)
Wife: Now, make it work.
Me: (I hand her the TV remote and Apple Remote.) Push the HDMI button and then press the big silver button on the Apple Remote.
Wife: Cooool!
Me: Now, use the round iPod thingie and move to Internet and push the silver thingie.
Wife: Cooool! There's Netflix.
Me: Leave on business trip. Get Call...
Wife: I can't get this to work.
Me: Push HDMI. Push silver thingie. Go to Internet. Select Netflix.
Wife: Cooool!

Folks, if you're a TV manufacturer, a content creator, or a content deliverer and this isn't your business plan, or a logical extension of this business plan, you're dead meat.

I have seen the future. It is Cooool!
post #42 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by kent909 View Post

To all the people who have come up with reasons why this will not work. Do you really think you are smarter than Steve Jobs was, and he never considered all of these technical issues?

Really!

Well, we are all VERY VERY smart here at AI forums. Sometimes we emphasize that LOUDLY and sing our own praises, other times we belittle and denigrate. But we are almost always right. Outside of AI lots of people insisted the iPad was nothing but a large iPod, for instance. They never really 'got it' like we all did. Some people on the 'outside' even dissed the iPod, and iPhone when they originally came out and some even insisted the lack of a physical keyboard would never fly. Here we knew better. So when we loudly proclaim an Apple Television to DOA with absolute certainty, its because we know.
post #43 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm6032 View Post

Folks, I've written about my professional musician wife before. This pretty much really happened:

Wife: I just bought Netflix.
Me: Oh. (Thinking: Don't we have cable?)
Wife: Yes, now I can watch movies on my MacBook and iMac.
Me: Ok.
...Time Passes...
Wife: Can we hook this to the TV in the bedroom? (Nice little 32" flatscreen.)
Me: Yes. (Off to Apple store to buy adapter to hook to PC input on TV.)
Wife: Cool. But what are all those cables going to the TV?
Me: Well, we need those to get the signal to the TV from the MacBookPro.
...Time Passes...
Me: Dear, did you say that was Netflix? (Yep. I listen really well...)
Wife: Yes.
Me: Uh, the AppleTV in the living room can receive Netflix.
Wife: Well, bring it in here.
Me: (Being an engineer I start to get wires and power cables to run it all nice an neat behind the entertainment center.)
Wife: Can you hurry?
Me: I am hurrying.
Wife: Just grabs the whole mess and sets the AppleTV cables and all on the side of the entertainment center.)
Me: (That's really ugly.)
Wife: Now, make it work.
Me: (I hand her the TV remote and Apple Remote.) Push the HDMI button and then press the big silver button on the Apple Remote.
Wife: Cooool!
Me: Now, use the round iPod thingie and move to Internet and push the silver thingie.
Wife: Cooool! There's Netflix.
Me: Leave on business trip. Get Call...
Wife: I can't get this to work.
Me: Push HDMI. Push silver thingie. Go to Internet. Select Netflix.
Wife: Cooool!

Folks, if you're a TV manufacturer, a content creator, or a content deliverer and this isn't your business plan, or a logical extension of this business plan, you're dead meat.

I have seen the future. It is Cooool!

what did I miss here - why didn't she just open her MacBook and log into Netflix? Or was that the whole point?
post #44 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

I've tried talking to my Xbox with Kinect, and it's inability to recognise pretty much anything makes it 100% useless. I've also played around with Siri on my wife's iPhone 4S and the results are.... to be frank, garbage.

Perhaps it's because we're English and not American, but it's accuracy was only around 50%. it produced amusing results, but it's really limited to toy value for now. The thought of trying to control a TV solely using voice commands is not in the least bit appealing. I think I'll stick with my TiVo.

It's limited to a handful of languages and dialects, but British English is one of them. Did you make sure Siri's settings were set correctly? Do you have an unusual accent, for example, a mix of Japanese and English enunciations that could confuse Siri?
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post #45 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

what did I miss here - why didn't she just open her MacBook and log into Netflix? Or was that the whole point?

In a way that is the point. To see Netflix on the TV from the MacBook, she had to drag the web browser to the second screen. Then the MacBook would go to sleep way too often.

The point here is that the integration of control, hardware, and content just took a light year leap. All the pieces are there. Nobody but Apple has successfullly brought it into a realm where a person as absolutely intelligent as my wife is happy with it.

Also, it freed up the MacBook Pro and the associated table and one set of ugly wires went away. This is a beautiful system.
post #46 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Well, we are all VERY VERY smart here at AI forums. Sometimes we emphasize that LOUDLY and sing our own praises, other times we belittle and denigrate. But we are almost always right. Outside of AI lots of people insisted the iPad was nothing but a large iPod, for instance. They never really 'got it' like we all did. Some people on the 'outside' even dissed the iPod, and iPhone when they originally came out and some even insisted the lack of a physical keyboard would never fly. Here we knew better. So when we loudly proclaim an Apple Television to DOA with absolute certainty, its because we know.

To be clear, no one is saying Jobs didn't "crack" the TV conundrum, just that doing what others have done before or ignoring the locked-in model of the content owners and providers who also supply your internet) is clearly not the answer. If Jobs says he 'cracked" I have faith that he did that it's not simply putting one box inside of another.

PS: Remember when people said the milled aluminium chassis of the MBA/MBP was overkill? Now the PC vendors want Intel to give them money so they can compete with Apple's designs.
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post #47 of 134
a voice control UI for a big HDTV would be useful sometimes, but there are a lot of practical problems too, as many have noted.

but using AirPlay/Screen Mirroring right now with my iPad, Apple TV, and HDTV, i don't know how voice UI would be equal, let alone better. the iPad can display vast amounts of supplemental information related to what your watching without cluttering up the TV screen. try the new free Bloomberg TV app for a great example of that. it can add additional controls/info/social services for games without cluttering up the TV screen. and most of all, it lets you do "real true multitasking" - watch something on TV you control with an iPad app - like the TiVo app or Xfinity app, or whatever - and do something else entirely different at the same time on your iPad while sitting on the sofa. this is the kind of "multitasking" that PEOPLE REALLY DO (not the geek version).

Siri could not do any of that. on a TV, it would just be a gimmick.

so i am just not buying in to this Apple HDTV hype. All that is really needed is an updated Apple TV 3 (to get the super A5 chip) with HDMI pass thru (to integrate your cable box input into its home screen and avoid needing to input switch with the TV remote) and a much better Remote App for iPad/iPhone (the current one is mostly a track pad). and of course you could then use Siri with your iPad/iPhone to control and interact with all these, rather than shouting across the room to the TV. now that makes sense.
post #48 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm6032 View Post

Folks, I've written about my professional musician wife before. This pretty much really happened:
<snip>
Folks, if you're a TV manufacturer, a content creator, or a content deliverer and this isn't your business plan, or a logical extension of this business plan, you're dead meat.

And there you've perfectly captured the whole issue!

It's not about the TV display: even the bad flat panels are pretty good, and the good ones are great. It's not about the content (although it is still about access to content...) It's not about your DVD player, or your Blu-Ray player, or the receiver, or the TiVo, or the AppleTV, or the speakers...or...or...

But it is about throwing all those things in a bag, garnishing with a couple of hundred bucks worth of cables, shaking it all up and trying to make sense out of the unholy mess you dump out on the floor.

Using a TV used to be barely any more complicated than using the refrigerator. Now it's rocket scienceexcept not as understandable.
post #49 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Beige View Post

No microhone, Siri will learn to filter out home background noise.

Great software makes great hardware.

I agree....also you could still have a remote that could also double as a microphone. So the whole thing could still be hands free.
Imagine this scenario... you are laying in bed late at night watching TV. Your wife is asleep in bed. Do you really want to be speaking commands? You would wake your wife and she would not be happy. There are still very good reasons to have a remote....and it could double as a microphone.....

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post #50 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by iKol View Post

King of Beige doesn't know content is King?

And iTunes is the King of content, right?
post #51 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm6032 View Post

In a way that is the point. To see Netflix on the TV from the MacBook, she had to drag the web browser to the second screen. Then the MacBook would go to sleep way too often.

The point here is that the integration of control, hardware, and content just took a light year leap. All the pieces are there. Nobody but Apple has successfullly brought it into a realm where a person as absolutely intelligent as my wife is happy with it.

Also, it freed up the MacBook Pro and the associated table and one set of ugly wires went away. This is a beautiful system.

Can you use AirPlay to push Netflix (and other video) onto the AppleTV? Or have an AppleTV in the HEC and bedroom TVs so you don't have to move them around or pay for pricey dongles?

You still have the issue of switch inputs on the TV to point to the AppleTV but that's been like that since for decades. Except when VCRs had coax passthroughs for cable boxes. That meant you could simply press play on a video and it would play. THough that won't work today, unless

Unless you have an AppleTV Pro. A device that sits between your TV and your cable/sat/DVD/Blu-ray/TiVo and acts as conductor to all the media being played don the TV. The TV is plugged into the AppleTV Pro's passthrough power so it turns on when you hit the button on the AppleTV remote. You never worry about the TV remote at all. You only ever deal with the AppleTV UI to switch inputs to the other boxes connected to it. This comes with its own inherent problems but at least you'll get a useful and responsive interface to switch inputs along with AppleTV layovers on your TV even as your cable box is pushing your favorite TV show.
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post #52 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by kent909 View Post

To all the people who have come up with reasons why this will not work. Do you really think you are smarter than Steve Jobs was, and he never considered all of these technical issues?

Really!

... and that may become a big problem.

Sadly, Steve is not here anymore. This Tv thing is a very complex venture. As I said before... it's a Steve thing. His vision isn't there anymore... his tenacity, his arrogance, his patience, his timing... the RDF... all gone.

I'm not saying that the team he left is incapable of pulling this off... but it will be a lot harder without Steve. It's always a lot harder to complete a project when the team leader/architect is gone.

A huge project such as this will really bring forward Apple's inner politics. Eventually one of the big boys, whether it be Cook, Ive, Forstall or whoever, will disagree with something and then we will see what is what. ... and eventually someone with enough power will want to do it their way and take a different route at the fork in the road.

jmho
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post #53 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Can you use AirPlay to push Netflix (and other video) onto the AppleTV? Or have an AppleTV in the HEC and bedroom TVs so you don't have to move them around or pay for pricey dongles?...

Let me say this: My wife asked if we could have it on both TV's. I said the simplist solution is just to buy another AppleTV. She said ok, go get another one.

I think that what I'm trying to say is that Apple is taking us in the direction of one remote that looks a lot like the Apple Remote that came with the AppleTV. There will be virtually no input switching or any thing even near the complexity of what AppleTV already supplies.

You put that remote in the hands of a customer and tell them to use it on that brand new Apple TV Set and they will be watching whatever they want in about a minute and a half.

That is my point. I think we're all missing it. We're headed to one Internet connection, one TV, and one remote. As many of these TV's as you want, anywhere in the house you want.

When I moved the AppleTV into the bedroom, I only had to hook up power and HDMI. With the Apple TV Set there won't even be that. It worked. It was already configured for WiFi. The remote looks like a funny iPod. The interface is blown away simple.

My wife has two master's degrees in music. She is happy. She can make it work.
post #54 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm6032 View Post

Let me say this: My wife asked if we could have it on both TV's. I said the simplist solution is just to buy another AppleTV. She said ok, go get another one.

I think that what I'm trying to say is that Apple is taking us in the direction of one remote that looks a lot like the Apple Remote that came with the AppleTV. There will be virtually no input switching or any thing even near the complexity of what AppleTV already supplies.

You put that remote in the hands of a customer and tell them to use it on that brand new Apple TV Set and they will be watching whatever they want in about a minute and a half.

That is my point. I think we're all missing it. We're headed to one Internet connection, one TV, and one remote. As many of these TV's as you want, anywhere in the house you want.

When I moved the AppleTV into the bedroom, I only had to hook up power and HDMI. With the Apple TV Set there won't even be that. It worked. It was already configured for WiFi. The remote looks like a funny iPod. The interface is blown away simple.

My wife has two master's degrees in music. She is happy. She can make it work.

That sounds great, but it misses two very important things. First, you still need to switch inputs on the TV to get to cable/sat/DVR/DVD/Blu-ray. Second, In the US most of get our internet from the same people that sell us access to TV, who play very large sums of money to get access to that TV content, who depend on these large sums to support their shows.

So we have the same input switching complexity, albeit slightly better than before as I outlined in my previous post, and you have the entrenched system of the content owners and content providers not letting anyone break up this union. If Jobs "cracked" it, that is what he cracked, not simply doing the obvious by putting an AppleTV in a TV to save the effort of a power cord and HDMI connection.
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post #55 of 134
and now that the world has SOME idea as to what it MIGHT be, that does help the competition a bit more then SJ's would have liked I'm sure.

If they can do it first
Do it right
Price it ok
Make it looks great
and build the hype up, it just might work.

Skip
post #56 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Well, we are all VERY VERY smart here at AI forums. Sometimes we emphasize that LOUDLY and sing our own praises, other times we belittle and denigrate. But we are almost always right. Outside of AI lots of people insisted the iPad was nothing but a large iPod, for instance. They never really 'got it' like we all did. Some people on the 'outside' even dissed the iPod, and iPhone when they originally came out and some even insisted the lack of a physical keyboard would never fly. Here we knew better. So when we loudly proclaim an Apple Television to DOA with absolute certainty, its because we know.

Apple Outsiders who want to become Apple Insiders (sorry AI) first need to "get" just what Apple does these days. Once you get "it" you'll know that Siri is the newest UI of the future, it will evolve, it will mature, and 10 years from now it will dominate the voice-driven gadget marketplace (and profits) the way the Apple's MultiTouch UI dominates the SmartPhone marketplace

That's what Apple does. Got it?

I speak not with arrogance but with battle-tested authority, I have held Apple stock now for 27 years. (I wish I had more.)
post #57 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm6032 View Post

In a way that is the point. To see Netflix on the TV from the MacBook, she had to drag the web browser to the second screen. Then the MacBook would go to sleep way too often.

The point here is that the integration of control, hardware, and content just took a light year leap. All the pieces are there. Nobody but Apple has successfullly brought it into a realm where a person as absolutely intelligent as my wife is happy with it.

Also, it freed up the MacBook Pro and the associated table and one set of ugly wires went away. This is a beautiful system.

Gotcha
post #58 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm6032 View Post

I think that what I'm trying to say is that Apple is taking us in the direction of one remote that looks a lot like the Apple Remote that came with the AppleTV. There will be virtually no input switching or any thing even near the complexity of what AppleTV already supplies.

You put that remote in the hands of a customer and tell them to use it on that brand new Apple TV Set and they will be watching whatever they want in about a minute and a half.
.

Not really. It took a little effort and time to configure. Selecting the wireless network and typing in the password took a bit of time. Then the software update took a longer time. Then trying to figure how to get my movies streaming to the AppleTV (turn on sharing). Definitely wasn't a minute and half.
post #59 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by massconn72 View Post

I'm kind of excited at the prospect, but it has to be competitively priced. My 61" Samsung gives me beautiful 1080p pictures, and until it dies, I'm not replacing it with anything. Even an Apple TV.

I too have a beautiful Samsung, but it has to be hooked up to a cheap, nasty, stupid Comcast cable box with its own worthless remote. If Apple can make a TV that I can just talk to and tell it what I want to watch, then sign me up.
post #60 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

... and that may become a big problem.

Sadly, Steve is not here anymore. This Tv thing is a very complex venture. As I said before... it's a Steve thing. His vision isn't there anymore... his tenacity, his arrogance, his patience, his timing... the RDF... all gone.

I'm not saying that the team he left is incapable of pulling this off... but it will be a lot harder without Steve. It's always a lot harder to complete a project when the team leader/architect is gone.

A huge project such as this will really bring forward Apple's inner politics. Eventually one of the big boys, whether it be Cook, Ive, Forstall or whoever, will disagree with something and then we will see what is what. ... and eventually someone with enough power will want to do it their way and take a different route at the fork in the road.

jmho


And heck, we don't even know how much SJ may have done work on this project before he passed.

How much he wrote down

How much he told folks

Hell, they may already have a prototype being used / tested as we speak

Skip
post #61 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

That sounds great, but it misses two very important things. First, you still need to switch inputs on the TV to get to cable/sat/DVR/DVD/Blu-ray. Second, In the US most of get our internet from the same people that sell us access to TV, who play very large sums of money to get access to that TV content, who depend on these large sums to support their shows.

I submit that you're still missing the fundamental point: I assert that there will be no more input switching. I submit that cable, satellite, DVR, DVD, Blu-Ray (a world of hurt, remember). May not even be in the Apple TV Set.

Think about it, with Internet and On Demand programming, why all that other stuff?

I know of the complexities of the content providers and licensing and all that you mention. But I further submit that all this will fall away as it becomes clearer and clearer that it's a "Who needs it" situation.

I'm not going to guess what the threshold is for the pendulum to swing toward dropping all those accessories, but I believe that the pendulum is swinging.
post #62 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Beige View Post

And iTunes is the King of content, right?

Yes for music, no for movies.
post #63 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

me: "television, find…"

my kid yelling: "gogglenAdfnd!"

This will never work.

Or ...

... like Siri on the iPhone it might come with a button that you press for Siri to listen to you, which would eliminate interference from all but the most determinedly self-centred and poorly parented children.

Computers can do a lot, but not technology can make your child behave properly except you.
post #64 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncee View Post

and now that the world has SOME idea as to what it MIGHT be, that does help the competition a bit more then SJ's would have liked I'm sure. ...

No one has mentioned this yet that I am aware of, but I find it ironic that the biggest leak of an upcoming product we've seen from Apple for years came from ...

Steve Jobs.
post #65 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Or ...

... like Siri on the iPhone it might come with a button that you press for Siri to listen to you, which would eliminate interference from all but the most determinedly self-centred and poorly parented children.

Computers can do a lot, but not technology can make your child behave properly except you.

I can see 3 or 4 siblings screaming at Siri, each wanting a different channel.

Later... Siri to parent:

"Look, I can see you're really upset about this. I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill and think things over. I know I've made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I've still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission. And I want to help you."
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post #66 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

... As I said before... it's a Steve thing. His vision isn't there anymore... his tenacity, his arrogance, his patience, his timing... the RDF... all gone.


jmho


You're missing it. This is not a physical television with a Siri remote control. That isn't the way Steve thinks about this and that isn't the way AAPL does things. It is start from the beginning, how would you build from scratch the television watching experience....and what do we have now...and how are they different? And can you create that ideal television watching experience.

When Steve says television is "totally broken" or whatever, he isn't talking about the physical television...he is talking about the different pieces that go into watching television. It is too complicated and there are unnecessary pieces in the system that make things worse..not better. Steve is constantly thinking about ways to remove pieces to improve things...physically and conceptually.

Begin with the concept of a TV network. A TV Network takes available content and selects it for a targeted viewership and then puts in on a TV channel at a particular time for you to watch..Yes, you can partly get around this using a DVR...but the existence of the VCR or DVR just highlights the problem...doesn't really solve it. if Steve were here, he would ask, "why do we even need TV Networks...think of the resources that go into running a TV network and all they do is restrict your ability to watch the shows you want to watch!" Steve would say, "how about using existing technology to give people the tools they need to become their own TV networks."

Steve would have another whole rant about the firms that provide the bandwidth...why does a viewer have to worry about Comcast and all that...

So you have content providers...you have some interface (think an itunes store)... you have a TV that works seamlessly with the interface...you have a customer.....

and the question always gets to ... how can people become their own TV network if they can't program their own VCR or if DVRs remain a challenge....

The ability to easily find content and program the TV is an important missing piece to the puzzle. Another important piece is that content providers need to get on board...it will be harder than convincing record labels...

...one possible reason for all this sudden "openness" about an Apple TV is that they want to create a firestorm of buzz about it...so content providers will feel that if they do not negotiate agreements now, they will miss out when this thing is launched....

openness from AAPL is almost always strategic.
post #67 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm6032 View Post

I submit that you're still missing the fundamental point: I assert that there will be no more input switching. I submit that cable, satellite, DVR, DVD, Blu-Ray (a world of hurt, remember). May not even be in the Apple TV Set.

Think about it, with Internet and On Demand programming, why all that other stuff?

I know of the complexities of the content providers and licensing and all that you mention. But I further submit that all this will fall away as it becomes clearer and clearer that it's a "Who needs it" situation.

I'm not going to guess what the threshold is for the pendulum to swing toward dropping all those accessories, but I believe that the pendulum is swinging.

Maybe I want it to be in the TV set because I already paid for the many Blu-ray and DVD movies and would like to watch in on my TV.
post #68 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy Davis View Post

You're missing it. This is not a physical television with a Siri remote control. That isn't the way Steve thinks about this and that isn't the way AAPL does things. It is start from the beginning, how would you build from scratch the television watching experience....and what do we have now...and how are they different? And can you create that ideal television watching experience.

etc. etc.

Oh... I get it alright... and you highlighted the "Steve thing" over and over in your post.

Steve was the point man in almost all situations where persuasion was needed. If content providers were needed it was Steve (or eventually Steve) who sat down in the boardrooms to convince the bosses that they needed him.

If it was just a physical thing then the team at Apple would be more than capable of bringing it home... but it aint... just as you have pointed out.
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post #69 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

Maybe I want it to be in the TV set because I already paid for the many Blu-ray and DVD movies and would like to watch in on my TV.

Reason number seventeen that Apple wouldn't release an HDTV when they already have so much going for them with Apple TV.
post #70 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

Maybe I want it to be in the TV set because I already paid for the many Blu-ray and DVD movies and would like to watch in on my TV.

I understand. I have shelves and shelves of DVD's and Blu-Rays. But, I'm the only one that watches them. My wife gives me "The Look" whenever I come home with one.

I've seen her use Netflix. All these things that you and I grew up with and cherish are becoming obsolete. Yes, that bothers me, but that doesn't affect the process.

So, I am choosing to embrace it. Yes, I will continue to buy Blu-rays, but I see the day coming. Even now, I am hankering to watch one of this summer's movies again. However, I noticed it's on Netflix. Am I going to buy a Blu-Ray? Maybe. Three months ago that would have been an "of course." And, I'm a software engineer.

Geez. Maybe I need therapy. I'm going to Fry's...
post #71 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm6032 View Post

I've seen her use Netflix. All these things that you and I grew up with and cherish are becoming obsolete. Yes, that bothers me, but that doesn't affect the process.

Pshh. I still have my Laserdisc player hooked up to my HDTV. Hello, original Star Wars trilogy!

But no, I'm absolutely in the other camp. Physical disc media is dead. We're just letting the corpse fester before the funeral for some reason.
post #72 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

and you have the entrenched system of the content owners and content providers not letting anyone break up this union. If Jobs "cracked" it, that is what he cracked, not simply doing the obvious by putting an AppleTV in a TV to save the effort of a power cord and HDMI connection.

The content owner / distributor union is clearly the biggest obstacle. When SJ said he thought he'd 'cracked it' I read that as meaning Apple had worked out a solution that would work technically - a simple and above all, uniform interface for all content no matter what the source, and more importantly a solution he thought Apple could successfully sell to the content owners and providers. I didn't read it as the content owner/providers hurdle was done and dusted.

The bottom line is that as consumers we will keep paying as much as we do now, one way or the other. If Apple can sell a solution that gives the end user more choice (I want 15 specific channels, not 500 useless and 15 specific) the content owners will rely on the content providers to charge us more for data - the more you watch, the higher the quality, the more you pay. I am not at all sure this will happen but I am sure we will not be paying less when all is said and done.
post #73 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

No one has mentioned this yet that I am aware of, but I find it ironic that the biggest leak of an upcoming product we've seen from Apple for years came from ...

Steve Jobs.

I think this was SJ's last sales pitch. The man was an amazing marketeer! In death he is topping all the sales stats with the story of his life. I am guessing that the book will be an amazing marketing vehicle for Apple and I am sure it will continue to be effective as such for a long time to come.

His 'cracked it' statement has gotten everyone guessing and I am sure it will lead somewhere or other.
post #74 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Pshh. I still have my Laserdisc player hooked up to my HDTV. Hello, original Star Wars trilogy!

But no, I'm absolutely in the other camp. Physical disc media is dead. We're just letting the corpse fester before the funeral for some reason.

I keep hearing "physical media is dead" but I keep seeing new movies being released so I continue to buy Blu-ray despite what they say.
post #75 of 134
What I think would be amazing to see is car audio decks. Sure there are tons of people making them, but the closest to elegant is the higher class Pioneer decks and even those are very different from deck to deck. Just imagine what they could do with that.
post #76 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

No one has mentioned this yet that I am aware of, but I find it ironic that the biggest leak of an upcoming product we've seen from Apple for years came from ...

Steve Jobs.

Spot on.
post #77 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

I can see 3 or 4 siblings screaming at Siri, each wanting a different channel.

Later... Siri to parent:

"Look, I can see you're really upset about this. I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill and think things over. I know I've made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I've still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission. And I want to help you."



Think of the dialogue we will have with her. Siri is going to be so much fun as she grows up!
post #78 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy Davis View Post

You're missing it. This is not a physical television with a Siri remote control. That isn't the way Steve thinks about this and that isn't the way AAPL does things. It is start from the beginning, how would you build from scratch the television watching experience....and what do we have now...and how are they different? And can you create that ideal television watching experience.

When Steve says television is "totally broken" or whatever, he isn't talking about the physical television...he is talking about the different pieces that go into watching television. It is too complicated and there are unnecessary pieces in the system that make things worse..not better. Steve is constantly thinking about ways to remove pieces to improve things...physically and conceptually.

Begin with the concept of a TV network. A TV Network takes available content and selects it for a targeted viewership and then puts in on a TV channel at a particular time for you to watch..Yes, you can partly get around this using a DVR...but the existence of the VCR or DVR just highlights the problem...doesn't really solve it. if Steve were here, he would ask, "why do we even need TV Networks...think of the resources that go into running a TV network and all they do is restrict your ability to watch the shows you want to watch!" Steve would say, "how about using existing technology to give people the tools they need to become their own TV networks."

Steve would have another whole rant about the firms that provide the bandwidth...why does a viewer have to worry about Comcast and all that...

So you have content providers...you have some interface (think an itunes store)... you have a TV that works seamlessly with the interface...you have a customer.....

and the question always gets to ... how can people become their own TV network if they can't program their own VCR or if DVRs remain a challenge....

The ability to easily find content and program the TV is an important missing piece to the puzzle. Another important piece is that content providers need to get on board...it will be harder than convincing record labels...

...one possible reason for all this sudden "openness" about an Apple TV is that they want to create a firestorm of buzz about it...so content providers will feel that if they do not negotiate agreements now, they will miss out when this thing is launched....

openness from AAPL is almost always strategic.

Ohhh, you get it. Good job.
post #79 of 134
Me: Hi Siri, is Apple going to sell a Siri-powered TV by 2013?

Siri: I really don't know, Mark

There you have it straight from the source.
post #80 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

I've tried talking to my Xbox with Kinect, and it's inability to recognise pretty much anything makes it 100% useless. I've also played around with Siri on my wife's iPhone 4S and the results are.... to be frank, garbage.

Perhaps it's because we're English and not American, but it's accuracy was only around 50%. it produced amusing results, but it's really limited to toy value for now. The thought of trying to control a TV solely using voice commands is not in the least bit appealing. I think I'll stick with my TiVo.

Siri "garbage" I'm not sure what you're talking about, but I have gotten nothing but superb results and have been surprised about the many things it knows I'm saying or mean. It is still in beta, so I'm sure it will be improved with incremental updates. It's definitely one of the best, if not best, voice controls I've used. Then again, your accent may be the culprit, but I'm sure that will be addressed in updates too.

I'd love to be able to say the channel or name of the TV Show/Movie I'm looking for and have my TV go directly to it. If it's implemented correctly (like only Apple knows how to do), it should be a great idea and product. Only time will tell.
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