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Unlike Apple's iOS, Android phones not getting updates - Page 2

post #41 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"Apple’s way of getting you to buy a new phone is to make you really happy with your current one, whereas apparently Android phone makers think they can get you to buy a new phone by making you really unhappy with your current one," Degusta said.

Speaks volumes as to who are the greedy ones and who cares about their customers!
post #42 of 215
"Being stuck with outdated software is a problem for users not just because they're missing features and refinements but also because of security updates."

Security updates to me is just as important as newer features.
post #43 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by RepairZoom View Post

In his defense Apple does recommend turning them off, I have had a number of Apple ppl tell me and it is listed under there "save battery life article"

How does clearing the history of recently used apps save battery life? Again assuming that none of the 20 apps used one of three permanent background services: sound, VoIP, navigation. Does clearing the RAM save that much battery? Or are apps able to misuse the task-completion for never-ending tasks?
post #44 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBRSTREETG View Post

What sealed the deal for me was Siri, A5, the camera and canceling the contract on my Evo 4G. It would have been a great phone if it didn't crash all the time and the updates, resets and restores were easy to do i.e. Apple like in management.

Oh yeah I'm not disputing the fact that its a good phone and iTunes is by far the biggest selling point, but at the end of the day it still has roughly the same specs as a lot of other phones and hardware wise there isn't much to set it apart so to claim other companies that charge hundreds of dollars to upgrade is a little ridiculous.

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post #45 of 215
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post #46 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Then why bother releasing new updates with new numbers and new names if you already have everything they have to offer?

So you're saying Gingerbread and Ice Cream Sandwich have absolutely no new features whatsoever? Why bother releasing them at all? Why bother having new software? Just keep making Froyo phones.

Perhaps once you have an actual argument. I still don't get why they'd release new updates with absolutely no new updates in the updates.

Gingerbread introduced a new keyboard, NFC support, native multi camera support, updated video drivers, a new garbage collector, improved power management, new UI refinements, internet calling via SIP account, downloads management.

This doesn't mean that apps can't run on the previous release (Froyo). Your argument doesn't make any sense.

Android is not fragmented. The only issue you would have would be on a device over 2 years old. And that would only be for a limited number of applications.

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post #47 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by RepairZoom View Post

Is that like the "new" iPhone 4s wow faster processor and a little better camera SO worth the $$ to get it!

The point, though, is that Apple updated the 3GS and the 4 to the latest OS, so people don't need to buy new phones if they don't want the new hardware but just want some of the new features like notification. ICS brings a lot of nice new OS enhancements, as did Gingerbread. However, if you are on a phone stuck with Froyo you get none of them. Nexus One owners, who up to now had received timely updates, are frozen out of Ice Cream Sandwich altogether. Sure, they wouldn't have received NFC support, since there is no NFC chip, or front camera support, but the UI enhancements would be nice.
post #48 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by RepairZoom View Post

In his defense Apple does recommend turning them off, I have had a number of Apple ppl tell me and it is listed under there "save battery life article"

Yeah, it isn't that they have no impact on the phone. Rather, my observation is due to the fact that any impact they have on the phone tends to be extremely minimal. Most services are terminated or placed on hold by design. Location services can cause some degree of fuss but I haven't ever seen a program which handles location services poorly (including GPS apps like TomTom).

I use a whole range of apps to accomplish all manner of tasks and the only times I have ever gone into the app list to terminate an app is when I'm lazy (e.g. getting TomTom to shut up after reaching a destination or reaching a familiar point in a route, rather than using the interface to clear the route or waiting for TomTom to realize I'm done) or when I want to close an app to clear its memory because it's crashing (e.g. that new Starbase Orions game is cool but crash prone). The only time I ever have something which even remotely resembles battery problems is when I've spent hours on the phone (e.g. when sick playing a game) and that is to be expected.

What more could be said for even the somewhat atypical parent and their phone?

One can achieve some extremely small degree of extra battery life by offing apps from that list, or by selectively offing an app which provides some kind of background service (note that this usually happens by user request), but it's hardly worth the effort in most cases, and although Apple presents it in that specific case, it isn't the recommended way to use the phone, nor is it how iOS multi-tasking was designed.
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post #49 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Ooh, we have a new contender in the competition for Most Wrong Comment In The Thread.

That's funny - and true

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post #50 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by SixnaHalfFeet View Post

Speaks volumes as to who are the greedy ones and who cares about their customers!

"Apple’s way of getting you to buy a new phone is to make you really happy with your current one, whereas apparently Android phone makers think they can get you to buy a new phone by making you really unhappy with your current one," Degusta said. "


Actually having worked for Apple their idea behind making a great phone is no so you will buy a new phone but rather you will buy a mac.... Yes people iPhones are Apple's gateway drug.

The iPhone is usually the first product that a consumer gets their hands on from Apple and Apple believes that if you build a good phone the consumer will be more likely to buy a Mac because they feel the quality and support will be the same, and they are pretty accurate..... Thought I would clarify a little.

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post #51 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by noirdesir View Post

How does clearing the history of recently used apps save battery life? Again assuming that none of the 20 apps used one of three permanent background services: sound, VoIP, navigation. Does clearing the RAM save that much battery? Or are apps able to misuse the task-completion for never-ending tasks?

Yeah I dont get it either, but I also have Apple Geniuses tell me that you cant take an iPod touch apart without the "guts falling out" and that the iPhone 4 cant be taking apart to replace the front screen....

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post #52 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Buy a cheap or free Android phone, get a functional smart phone with a decent browser, decent email and texting, excellent maps and navigation, OK media playback and some currently popular games. If you never stray much beyond that functionality, and the phone works OK when you get it, you're probably content to use what you have, even if an update should become available.

This is a strong motivation for developers to focus their efforts on iOS instead of Android. More people downloading creates more opportunity to make money
post #53 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

There's a new Android phone being released every 5 minutes. A new Android phone being released is as exciting and rare as taking a dump.

Let's take the analogy further! If you buy an android phone, or if you are taking a dump every 5 minutes, you should get yourself checked out!
post #54 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by stynkfysh View Post

And also to be fair, all iPhones don't receive all updates in each iOS update. Siri is case-in-point. Only the 4S has that one, officially.

There should be a distinction between getting all the updates and getting all the features. While an old iPhone may not get all the features, they are able to get the updates, which maintains the wide pool of opportunity for developers. Your OS has to get pretty old to make it so developers have to make their apps backward compatible.

To be fair, the 3G to iOS 4 was dreadful. I'm glad to see that the 3GS is not suffering to the same extent with iOS5. Seems like they made a good effort to solve that problem this time around.
post #55 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by RepairZoom View Post

Is that like the "new" iPhone 4s wow faster processor and a little better camera SO worth the $$ to get it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by RepairZoom View Post

I find that amusing as with ATT if you want to upgrade in contract say from a 4 to a 4S it will cost you $299 the first time and like $499 the second time

Lucky you! Sprint wanted $650 from me to go from Evo to 4S. I just got on with Verizon for $199.
post #56 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by RepairZoom View Post

In his defense Apple does recommend turning them off, I have had a number of Apple ppl tell me and it is listed under there "save battery life article"

This is only applicable for apps that use, for example, GPS. Mapquest, Waze, Reminders (with geofencing) all continue to run GPS in the background and will affect the battery.

For the majority of apps, you do NOT need to close them, and there is a HUGE benefit to having them freeze rather than "true multi-task."

PS I like how you came to his defense before anybody actually jumped on him Nice work
post #57 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

I wonder if the average Android user even notices or cares if he or she can get the latest OS, though?

Buy a cheap or free Android phone, get a functional smart phone with a decent browser, decent email and texting, excellent maps and navigation, OK media playback and some currently popular games. If you never stray much beyond that functionality, and the phone works OK when you get it, you're probably content to use what you have, even if an update should become available.

You make an interesting point.

I use an iPhone and have apps like: flashcards, tv listings, language dictionaries, and a sleep tracker; which stray from the typical functionality of a smartphone.

I wonder what portion of Android users use such atypical apps. Any out there care to weigh in?
post #58 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by wcbaritone10 View Post

Don't get me wrong, I love my iPhone and dont plan on ever buying a different phone as long as the iPhone is out there, but not everyone fully uses or understands the iPhone software updates either. My parents both got iP4s after they had their 3Gs and to this day still do not even know the multi-tasking exists. Every time I pick up on of their phones the first thing I do is turn off at least 20 apps. I don't think I am going to even bother trying to explain iOS5 to them. I'll just let them be happy with what they're used to.

The architecture is such that it generally doesn't require closing apps. Unless they're complaining of problems, it's unnecessary.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RepairZoom View Post

In his defense Apple does recommend turning them off, I have had a number of Apple ppl tell me and it is listed under there "save battery life article"

Here is the article I found and I didn't see anything about "closing" apps:
http://www.apple.com/batteries/iphone.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

73% of iPhone 4S buyers are upgraders
http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...4gb_model.html

I'm not sure what this means as a reply.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RepairZoom View Post

and that the iPhone 4 cant be taking apart to replace the front screen....

I think "can't" here is short hand for "It's pretty complicated, tedious and most people aren't able to do it". It's a lot easier than to give a list of caveats. The chance of failure from someone that's not reasonably qualified is pretty high.
post #59 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by am8449 View Post

You make an interesting point.

I use an iPhone and have apps like: flashcards, tv listings, language dictionaries, and a sleep tracker; which stray from the typical functionality of a smartphone.

I wonder what portion of Android users use such atypical apps. Any out there care to weigh in?

I wish I was joking but my Android crashed so much it just became tiring to use it for anything other than phone calls, email and checking when the next bus or train was coming and that app crashed all the time. The experience was dismal.
post #60 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBRSTREETG View Post

Apple ][ is twelve so don't expect anything intelligent.

Quick, somebody call the cops! That would mean my gf is a child rapist!
post #61 of 215
I bet they would break a lot of phones - they don't have the resources to test and there are too many different phones especially when carriers go off and make changes of their own.
post #62 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by am8449 View Post

You make an interesting point.

I use an iPhone and have apps like: flashcards, tv listings, language dictionaries, and a sleep tracker; which stray from the typical functionality of a smartphone.

I wonder what portion of Android users use such atypical apps. Any out there care to weigh in?

Hmmm, I have a Nexus S.

I use a dictionary
Play minecraft
Use a voice recorder
Flash player settings

and that's about it. Everything else is either a Google app or for productivity in some way.
post #63 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I'm not sure what this means as a reply.

he's trying to paint a picture that Apple has no new buyers, just all the previous sheeple buying again. Of course he misses that repeat customers are a great sign of customer satisfaction, something Apple exceeds in and something Android's vendors envy in Apple. He also fails to see how iPhone sales continually rise year after year, so unless he wants to argue that these same few sheeple are exponentially buying new iPhones each quarter he'll have to admit that Apple's year long sales with the same product are mostly to new buyers.
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post #64 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Quick, somebody call the cops! That would mean my gf is a child rapist!

Nice comeback
post #65 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by am8449 View Post

You make an interesting point.

I use an iPhone and have apps like: flashcards, tv listings, language dictionaries, and a sleep tracker; which stray from the typical functionality of a smartphone.

I wonder what portion of Android users use such atypical apps. Any out there care to weigh in?

I have a TV listing and reminders app (TV Show favs)

that's about it as far as "Atypical" apps go...the rest are native apps for social sites (twitter, facebook, google +, myspace - just kidding about myspace)

maps, a subway listing app, an audio manager, file/photo hider app (very useful), 3 file managers (1 that comes with MIUI, one that has root access, and another that I hardly use but I use to back in my G1, Nexus One days so it's more nostalgic...plus it allows me to edit zip files without extracting them)

IMDb, ReadItLater, Engadget, XDA, Pulse News Reader
8 games (3 angry birds, Shadowgun, MC2, Nova 2, WordsWF, and a game called Project INF a top down team deathmatch/CTF game that is noticeably outdated)
A banking app, A backup app, a barcode scanner
3 different cameras not counting stock, and a photo editor and video player
SoundCloud, Shazam,
A translate app, a craigslist app, and thats about it really.
post #66 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seankill View Post

Well, depending on how you define out of date, the IPhone comes out with outdated hardware. Now I own a IPhone 4 and love it. However, Steve is wrong, there is no one size fits all. Otherwise, It wouldn't exist. I am in college(Engineering); so a lot of my friends like to mess with coding and stuff. The android is open so they can do this. I do not know anything about that stuff, so a phone that works great and does most of the same thing, IPhone is better for me. (Until they get more than like 20% thinner than the Iphone 4, then ill jump to android, simply cause I don't get Apple's thing with things being 1mm thin. I want to hold something, not air.

Steve didn't say one size fits all. He said, this is how Apple does it.

Of course, some models will always be obsoleted, after a decent interval. But the latest OS will NEVER get onto the HTC Nexus One, and that's recent, right? A year and a half ago?

iOS5 fits on the 3Gs, and that's how old? Oh, and how, oh how do you get the update? Plug it in to charge it and you get the notification.
post #67 of 215
While fragmentation is an issue that needs to be taken care of ASAP (part of the reason I feel Google should go vertical if they have to) the chart is purposefully misleading.
post #68 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swift View Post

Steve didn't say one size fits all. He said, this is how Apple does it.

Of course, some models will always be obsoleted, after a decent interval. But the latest OS will NEVER get onto the HTC Nexus One, and that's recent, right? A year and a half ago?

iOS5 fits on the 3Gs, and that's how old? Oh, and how, oh how do you get the update? Plug it in to charge it and you get the notification.

It's been almost 2 years.

And ICS will most likely be ported to the Nexus One, it just will never see an official update.
post #69 of 215
Imagine, for a minute, that you could control your TV with your voice. And what it was calling up wasn't "channels," but apps. Buy Comedy Central. Buy or rent X. Play free web video. Your TV also has FaceTime on it. Kind of an Apple TV with apps and program storage. Multi-tier cable for $200 a month? No, no. Buy what you actually watch. Get a few basic channels from cable, for sports, live news and events.
post #70 of 215


"As of August, progress was spotty, and abysmal at T-Mobile and Verizon, where AndroidAndMe found that only a fraction of phones with those carriers were running the latest version of Android."

"What's the end result of fragmentation for you and me? First, the constant game of waiting for updates--some of your friends have Gingerbread, you're still on Froyo, you're complaining about that and then another friend comes up behind you and says they haven't even gotten Froyo. You never know when updates are coming, other than rumors on blogs and forums, and there never seems to be a reason for the delay. That's just a terrible customer experience--but it's not the worst problem.

"Fragmentation also leads to lukewarm developer support, which leaves us frustratingly behind the apps race compared to the iTunes App Store. And it means delays on hotly desired apps, like the Netflix app, which the company said was nearly impossible to develop considering the lack of a common DRM platform across devices."

Dear Android: This is your last Chance


Quote:
Originally Posted by MaroonMushroom View Post

Android is not fragmented. The only issue you would have would be on a device over 2 years old. And that would only be for a limited number of applications.
post #71 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post


Dear Android: This is your last Chance

I wholeheartedly agree with that article.

For modders, and hackers, and tweakers, etc...Android will probably always be fine as we are more forgiving because we can fix shit ourselves.

But for the average consumer, Android IS ugly, Android IS buggy, and Android IS unintuitive.

ICS fixes at least 2 of those problems from what I can see, let's hope they can fix the 3rd, and also let's hope that OEMs realize it isn't 2006 and earlier anymore and the blitzkreig phone release and ignore model of the past isn't gonna work.
post #72 of 215
Oddly enough I just came across this article which fits perfectly here...


http://theunderstatement.com/post/11...ory-of-support

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post #73 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

I wonder if the average Android user even notices or cares if he or she can get the latest OS, though?

Buy a cheap or free Android phone, get a functional smart phone with a decent browser, decent email and texting, excellent maps and navigation, OK media playback and some currently popular games. If you never stray much beyond that functionality, and the phone works OK when you get it, you're probably content to use what you have, even if an update should become available.

My dad had some old Samsung model running some ancient version of Android, 1.x I believe. He doesn't know the version. It has never been updated, and AT&T has never tried to encourage, enable, to help him upgrade (and why would they? They would rather sell him a new phone and get him to re-up his 2-year contract). It was a free phone deal anyway. So I wasn't expecting to hear my dad tell me that he had upgraded his iPod Touch (4th Gen) to iOS 5 already. I was surprised he even knew what it was, why he should upgrade, and how to do it. Apple makes it a cinch. This is why fragmentation is minimized on iOS.

BTW, he's ready to ditch his Samsung phone... He says half the touch screen sometimes stops receiving input and he has to reboot it, LOL.

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post #74 of 215
  • 7 of the 18 Android phones never ran a current version of the OS.
  • 12 of 18 only ran a current version of the OS for a matter of weeks or less.
  • 10 of 18 were at least two major versions behind well within their two year contract period.
  • 11 of 18 stopped getting any support updates less than a year after release.
  • 13 of 18 stopped getting any support updates before they even stopped selling the device or very shortly thereafter.
  • 15 of 18 dont run Gingerbread, which shipped in December 2010.
  • In a few weeks, when Ice Cream Sandwich comes out, every device on here will be another major version behind.
  • At least 16 of 18 will almost certainly never get Ice Cream Sandwich.
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post #75 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPOM View Post

Nexus One owners, who up to now had received timely updates, are frozen out of Ice Cream Sandwich altogether.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swift View Post

But the latest OS will NEVER get onto the HTC Nexus One, and that's recent, right? A year and a half ago?

iOS5 fits on the 3Gs, and that's how old? Oh, and how, oh how do you get the update? Plug it in to charge it and you get the notification.

New Rule: When referring to Android updates categorize them Official or Unofficial.

With that now said, just because the Phone isn't getting updated by Google/Manufacturer/Carrier does NOT instantly mean that that particular phone will NEVER see said version. Case in point, the T-mobile G1 was able to go up to Gingerbread(1.5, 1.6 2.0, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3) unsupported by Google or HTC for 3 years before being legacized and abandoned this year by the community. 1 phone duration in canada, almost 2 Entire contracts with a US carrier.

Secondly the Nexus one already has an SDK port of Ice cream sandwhich running on it. However it's still missing a some features that are being worked on such as bluetooth and small issues with data.

And lastly, The Nexus one was a developer phone which received almost zero marketing, sold unlocked and primarily for Tech oriented folks so I HIGHLY doubt that Google not updating the Nexus one will stop them from getting Ice cream Sandwhich.
post #76 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaroonMushroom View Post

Android is not fragmented.

The rest of the planet's definition begs to differ.

Originally posted by Marvin

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post #77 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jexus View Post

New Rule: When referring to Android updates categorize them Official or Unofficial.

With that now said, just because the Phone isn't getting updated by Google/Manufacturer/Carrier does NOT instantly mean that that particular phone will NEVER see said version. Case in point, the T-mobile G1 was able to go up to Gingerbread(1.5, 1.6 2.0, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3) unsupported by Google or HTC for 3 years before being legacized and abandoned this year by the community. 1 phone duration in canada, almost 2 Entire contracts with a US carrier.

Secondly the Nexus one already has an SDK port of Ice cream sandwhich running on it. However it's still missing a some features that are being worked on such as bluetooth and small issues with data.

And lastly, The Nexus one was a developer phone which received almost zero marketing, sold unlocked and primarily for Tech oriented folks so I HIGHLY doubt that Google not updating the Nexus one will stop them from getting Ice cream Sandwhich.

What a foolish argument. Sure, there will always homebrew ways of poorly cramming some OS onto some HW but that isn't how you categorize CE. If the vendor or carrier isn't issuing an update for that device then that's it. Done! Kaput! You can't claim that some guy in Budapest figured out a way to get ICS on the Nexus One (though the speaker and BT don't work and the battery lasts 1/3 the time) and then claim that isn't fragmentation. Consumers aren't going to bother with all that crap. They want a simple solution that works. A solution they can trust. Note the C in CE stands for Consumer, not Coder.
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post #78 of 215
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post #79 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

  • 7 of the 18 Android phones never ran a current version of the OS.
  • 12 of 18 only ran a current version of the OS for a matter of weeks or less.
  • 10 of 18 were at least two major versions behind well within their two year contract period.
  • 11 of 18 stopped getting any support updates less than a year after release.
  • 13 of 18 stopped getting any support updates before they even stopped selling the device or very shortly thereafter.
  • 15 of 18 dont run Gingerbread, which shipped in December 2010.
  • In a few weeks, when Ice Cream Sandwich comes out, every device on here will be another major version behind.
  • At least 16 of 18 will almost certainly never get Ice Cream Sandwich.

[citation required]

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post #80 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

The rest of the planet's definition begs to differ.

Please explain how Android is fragmented then.

I've already explained twice that only need Froyo (2 year old OS) to run the latest applications.

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