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S t e v e - J o b s

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Apple Co-founder, Steve Jobs.

Should the "c" is "Co" be capitalized? Is the use of the comma correct?
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #2 of 19
In titles, at least, both are capitalized. And your comma's correct, yes.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #3 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

In titles, at least, both are capitalized. And your comma's correct, yes.

If it's not a title, e.g. it's the subject of the sentence, the "c" should not be capitalized, as it's not an official position or title.

"Apple co-founder, Steve Jobs, was a man who touched our lives in many ways."
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Apple Co-founder, Steve Jobs.

Should the "c" is "Co" be capitalized? Is the use of the comma correct?

Does one write "Co-**mma"?

*Of course not!

Heck. How would you like it if someone sent an iMessage to your i-Phone?


Drop the hyphen for fakes sake... "cofounder".


**[see here--- Prefixes. Most common prefixes do not require a hyphen: aftereffect, antifreeze, cofounder, Internet, microwave, oversight, preempt, reexamine, supermarket, unbiased, underground.---] (î http://www.docstyles.com/cmscrib.htm î)


Websters too shines a light on this dark and rancid corner of grammatical ignorance. [see list here--- http://www.americanquarterly.org/sub..._March2010.pdf ---]
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hands Sandon View Post

Does one write "Co-**mma"?

*Of course not!

Heck. How would you like it if someone sent an iMessage to your i-Phone?


Drop the hyphen for fakes sake... "cofounder".


**[see here--- Prefixes. Most common prefixes do not require a hyphen: aftereffect, antifreeze, cofounder, Internet, microwave, oversight, preempt, reexamine, supermarket, unbiased, underground.---] (î http://www.docstyles.com/cmscrib.htm î)


Websters too shines a light on this dark and rancid corner of grammatical ignorance. [see list here--- http://www.americanquarterly.org/sub..._March2010.pdf ---]

Hmm... I've seen co-founder hundreds, perhaps thousands of times with the hyphen. I'm sure your example is the first time I've ever seen it without. There are, in fact, many individual terms in English that are hyphenated, and like many aspects of the mess that is the English language, it comes down to usage, not rules. Usage would say hyphen.
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Co-founder is always hyphenated. Check any dictionary, including Apple's.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

In titles, at least, both are capitalized. And your comma's correct, yes.

When you say "both are capitalized", what do you mean?
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

When you say "both are capitalized", what do you mean?

Sorry, both C and F in Co-Founder.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Sorry, both C and F in Co-Founder.

This would be incorrect. According to AP and CMOS, in titles, all hyphenated terms receive a capital only on the first word, unless the second word is a proper noun.

Apple Co-founder Steve Jobs, in a Nutshell
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

This would be incorrect. According to AP and CMOS, in titles, all hyphenated terms receive a capital only on the first word, unless the second word is a proper noun.

Apple Co-founder Steve Jobs, in a Nutshell

Really? Huh. Bunch of wrong titles on articles, then. Even limited to Apple itself!

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Really? Huh. Bunch of wrong titles on articles, then. Even limited to Apple itself!

There are other style manuals that say otherwise. Having worked in news media, however, I generally stick with AP.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Hmm... I've seen co-founder hundreds, perhaps thousands of times with the hyphen. I'm sure your example is the first time I've ever seen it without. There are, in fact, many individual terms in English that are hyphenated, and like many aspects of the mess that is the English language, it comes down to usage, not rules. Usage would say hyphen.

A lot of once hyphenated words are now written without it. It's your choice though, but I'm sure you wouldn't write "super-market" any more.
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
Reply
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Co-founder is always hyphenated. Check any dictionary, including Apple's.

Maybe Apple's dictionary isn't the latest release? The hyphen wasn't dropped until the current, 11th edition of Websters, which I think came out in 2006.
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Apple Co-founder, Steve Jobs.

Should the "c" is "Co" be capitalized? Is the use of the comma correct?

what is the big deal!
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

what is the big deal!

Proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation matter.

Unlike what my generation and below believes.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation matter.

Unlike what my generation and below believes.

"Proper" is subjective. Language evolves over time due to usage. If people don't use the what the dictionary says they should, they change the dictionary.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

"Proper" is subjective. Language evolves over time due to usage.

It's also there to convey meaning and if that meaning is conveyed, it has served its purpose.

I colud, witre lkie tihs - and "poelpe can sitll ~ raed' it no porbelm.

I think that people should take care when they want to share information so it's done in the most accurate way but spelling, grammar and punctuation are among the least important mistakes people can make and can be largely forgiven.
post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

It's also there to convey meaning and if that meaning is conveyed, it has served its purpose.

I colud, witre lkie tihs - and "poelpe can sitll ~ raed' it no porbelm.

I think that people should take care when they want to share information so it's done in the most accurate way but spelling, grammar and punctuation are among the least important mistakes people can make and can be largely forgiven.

Indeed, but it's nice to have everything right. It's for a flyer for a business I am the co-founder of, and I wanted to spend a little time getting it right, because I feel that attention to detail will reflect on the way people view my business as a whole.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Indeed, but it's nice to have everything right. It's for a flyer for a business I am the co-founder of, and I wanted to spend a little time getting it right, because I feel that attention to detail will reflect on the way people view my business as a whole.

In that case, personally, I think, Steve Jobs, Co-Founder flows best from a artistic-license and graphic design point of view. So that's the format that should be used for business cards.

For regular copy, Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple, Inc. works best for British and International English AFAIK.
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