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Google Chairman Eric tells US senators Apple's Siri could pose 'competitive threat' - Page 4

post #121 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

Either way, I'm not a fan of anti-trust stuff... Kind of bugs me on a philosophical standpoint (no need for someone to argue their point)

wow... Just wow.
Sheep to slaughter much?
post #122 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

I don't agree that is classic monopolistic behaviour. On the other hand, there is an interesting point here - if not Android, what choices would the likes of HTC, Samsung and others have? They would have been left to customize Linux on their own or continue with Windows Mobile. I'm not sure the smartphone world would be a better place. Would iPhone alone have pushed MS to retrench and come up with a new approach?

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

That's an interesting question, but I don't think WP7 today would be much different without Android because iOS would still the biggest obstacle for MS to overcome in the mobile space. The only difference would likely be Apple having more percentage but MS may still have had close to what it has now with or without Android's presence.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

One difference: Samsung, HTC, etc. would have no alternative to Windows Mobile (sure Samsung can continue to pretend they can roll their own). So perhaps (and I am guessing) the pressure on MS would have been less.

First of all, these sort of "what if...(we lived in an alternate universe)" questions are somewhat meaningless, because they cannot be answered. But, apart from WP7, and homegrown solutions, What might have been the future of, say, WebOS, if Android were not being given away for "free"?

So, the argument that the industry "needed" Android, is really nothing more than a disingenuous post hoc rationalization.

And Android isn't the only case of product dumping by Google, it's their entire MO.
post #123 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Agreed.

People are arguing over whether Google has a "monopoly" or not but ignoring the fact that true absolute monopolies rarely if ever exist. Oligarchical control is essentially the same thing. In Canada for instance there are three big cell companies that control 80-90% of the market. They are all separate companies and no one has a "monopoly," but they all have the same prices and the same plans and they all treat the customers like dogs.

Chasing after the "true monopoly" and trying to peg Google or Microsoft with that term is a hopeless and essentially useless task. All of these companies are far too big and have far too much control over our lives. They have more control that the average Government and yet no one voted them in and no one can tell them what to do.

But that's what happens when you live in an essentially fascist society. :-/

Hmmm... Not arguing against your whole post but we _did_ "vote them in"... with our dollars (or in this case, eyeballs which amounts to the same thing)! In fact we can "vote them out" in the same way... by not giving them our eyeballs / dollars.

And that's why they're not a monopoly. Because we do still have viable choices (both Bing and Yahoo work well enough that if you were upset at google you could start using those).

To me, this is just big government trying to control the private market even more than they already do... and I bet that if you were to trace the money you might find one of their competitors had a hand in "influencing" the government representatives involved...
post #124 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Nope, it's still legal. Charlie Sheen is cruising along quite well.

Poor old Charlie. When choosing our path to riches we must take our mental health in to account.
post #125 of 232
Google are not stupid, its said in the industry that Apple's iADs delivers the best on mobile device advertising. Siri poses a serious threat because its interactive and capable of making Google search irrelevant hence the "Google killer". There's always a bigger fish in the ocean.
Apple have some very unique technologies which existed before but no one could present them and market them they way they did. Matbe its time to start re inventing themselves like the rest with nokia looking at flexible handsets, htc music etc.

http://www.gadgetrophy.com/2011/10/u...tmas-2011.html
post #126 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

First of all, these sort of "what if...(we lived in an alternate universe)" questions are somewhat meaningless, because they cannot be answered.

Agreed. But, as *outsiders* (at least I am an outsider), what else are we left with exceptional meaningless discussions. Aside from choosing what products to buy, we have no skin in the game.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

But, apart from WP7, and homegrown solutions, What might have been the future of, say, WebOS, if Android were not being given away for "free"?

Isn't this a bigger "what if"? Neither Palm nor HP was offering WebOS to 3rd party hardware manufacturers, until very recently (and even that, AFAIK, is hearsay).

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

So, the argument that the industry "needed" Android, is really nothing more than a disingenuous post hoc rationalization.

Post hoc, yes. But again, what else do we have to discuss about? The alternative to post hoc analysis is speculation about the future. How's that more rational? As for disingenuous - you're free to accuse me of that if it pleases you, but I am satisfied with myself that it was a sincere rationalization.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

And Android isn't the only case of product dumping by Google, it's their entire MO.

That's post hoc analysis, and a baseless one unless you have irrefutable proof of their plans. I'd concede that this business model is interesting to analyze in the context of *dumping*.
post #127 of 232
To all those accusing Google of copying Apple, consider this:

Did Apple copy Google (and many others) by entering the Cloud computing field?

Did Apple copy Google with its iOS5 notification scheme?

Did Apple copy Google by adding speech recognition (even if they executed it better)?

It's a slippery slope.
post #128 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by friedmud View Post

... To me, this is just big government trying to control the private market even more than they already do...

So, why is "big government" (that the citizen has some modicum of control over), a bad thing and "big corporations" (which the citizen has no control at all over), "good."

I don't really expect you to answer anything reasonable here as your comment about how we control companies "through our dollars," shows a rather complete lack of understanding about politics and economics. I'm just pointing out the giant gaping hole in your argument/ideology with the arctic wind raging through it.

Americans are always going on about the evils of big government but they let huge, un-elected corporations rule the country (and most of the rest of the world), essentially unchecked and without even guidelines as to how these entities are supposed to act, let alone actual rules and regulations.

Americans are always also going on about "freedom" and letting the people decide what they want to do for themselves, but individual american citizens have demonstrably fewer freedoms than European or Canadian citizens, and no protection at all from corporate "mega-citizens who actually enjoy more rights and freedoms than the people themselves.
post #129 of 232
Eric Schmidt is absolutely right, but it won't happen immediately.
As long as you can get the answer you want (or bypass the answer and go straight to the solution) then you won't really care if it's Google or something else. By bypassing the answer and going straight to the solution I mean that if you can simply have your trip booked automatically, or your movie tickets reserved, or your whatever done for you, then you don't even need an answer; just a "done". I believe that is the future of computing. A very smart butler who knows everything about you and your preferences and those of your friends/family.

I thought that having a search bar at the top of browsers left Google wide open. After all, if you could get the answer you wanted, then it didn't matter if Google.com had mindshare, no one would be going to the site anyway. Just using whatever search field was default at the top of the screen. I think Microsoft and others missed a big opportunity here by not having a solution that was "good enough" at that point.

This natural language, solution-based question/command structure is very powerful. I think it's future is more robust than "search". Don't get me wrong.. I think Google has a huge dog in this race and they know it and they could very well win this one too. I'm often too hard on Google because Apple is my favourite company and I consider them a very strong competitor to Apple. Google is the champ of search though and they are right to worry about what Siri is doing. That just means they know it's the right track and will fortify their own efforts in natural language solutions.
post #130 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Hello, I'm Eric Schmidt... What, me search monopoly?


Created on my iPad!


Whoa! That's creepier than the real thing!
Alfred E. Neuman even looks like Eric "Chubby Cheeks" Schmidt

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #131 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

So, why is "big government" (that the citizen has some modicum of control over), a bad thing and "big corporations" (which the citizen has no control at all over), "good."

Why is the latest lemon scented detergent more scary to you than 10,000 men at arms?
post #132 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

To all those accusing Google of copying Apple, consider this:

Did Apple copy Google (and many others) by entering the Cloud computing field?

Did Apple copy Google with its iOS5 notification scheme?

Did Apple copy Google by adding speech recognition (even if they executed it better)?

It's a slippery slope.

1. are you coping someone when you buy a car or are going to take a piss?

2. no. they improved their own...

3. apple already had speech recognition.

did google basically copied apple's iOS style in appearance and apps after they saw it?

did google hypocritically lied to us, when they say that they are "open", "free", and they "do no evil"?

is google basically a big and important company but also the current most hypocrite one?

YES
post #133 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

is google basically a great company but also the current most hypocrite one?

YES

That's far from an objective conclusion.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #134 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

...

Isn't this a bigger "what if"? Neither Palm nor HP was offering WebOS to 3rd party hardware manufacturers, until very recently (and even that, AFAIK, is hearsay).

...

That's post hoc analysis, and a baseless one unless you have irrefutable proof of their plans. I'd concede that this business model is interesting to analyze in the context of *dumping*.

Well, you're the one who wanted to play the "what if..." game. But it's not a bigger "what if", and it's the whole point of looking at Google's dumping practices. Using their profits from search, they give products away to poison the market for others, classic anti-competitive behavior.

But, maybe you don't know the meaning of MO -- i.e., Method of Operation -- which is essentially an analysis of past actions, not future.
post #135 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

You're asking the wrong person on this one. I always assumed there were pros and cons with performance when using Google's DNS and that it would slow as more users hopped on board so I never tried it.

Check this out http://code.google.com/p/namebench/
Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #136 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbryanh View Post

Google is way too big. Take it apart with a crowbar. Apple's just about there, too. An unregulated corporation is to humanity what a flaming chain saw is to a five-year-old.

No corporation should ever be allowed to even approach a government in terms of power and wealth. Corporate boards don't sit general elections and corporate meetings are held in secret. While they're allegedly responsible to their stockholders, given that a tiny portion of the populace trades nearly all the stock, "stockholder" is nothing a euphemism for "oligarch," and in practice, multinational corporations are seldom held responsible for anything.

Particularly in a country where it's legal, cheap, and accepted for corporate money to openly buy Congressman a six-pack at a time, the whole notion of responsibility would resemble a farce by Moliere, but for the complete absence of wit.

Though I agree with much of what you say, when you try to sound intelligent by forming complex sentences with big words, you don't sound any smarter. Actually, you sound dumber because you don't understand how to properly form a complete sentence, don't know where commas go, and don't know when and when not to use conjunctions like "but". As a result, your complex sentences only show your incompetence.

Sorry, I can't stand it when people try to sound smart by butchering the English language with unnecessary complexity. Plus, I can't stand it when people agree with me politically but are incapable of sounding intelligent.

My advice: Simple, clear and "correct" language is much more effective, and don't use big words when smaller words work just as well. Ask any English professor, and they'll tell you the same.
post #137 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

So, why is "big government" (that the citizen has some modicum of control over), a bad thing and "big corporations" (which the citizen has no control at all over), "good."

I don't really expect you to answer anything reasonable here as your comment about how we control companies "through our dollars," shows a rather complete lack of understanding about politics and economics. I'm just pointing out the giant gaping hole in your argument/ideology with the arctic wind raging through it.

Americans are always going on about the evils of big government but they let huge, un-elected corporations rule the country (and most of the rest of the world), essentially unchecked and without even guidelines as to how these entities are supposed to act, let alone actual rules and regulations.

Americans are always also going on about "freedom" and letting the people decide what they want to do for themselves, but individual american citizens have demonstrably fewer freedoms than European or Canadian citizens, and no protection at all from corporate "mega-citizens who actually enjoy more rights and freedoms than the people themselves.

My hero?

Yes...yes you are.
post #138 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

So, why is "big government" (that the citizen has some modicum of control over), a bad thing and "big corporations" (which the citizen has no control at all over), "good."

I don't really expect you to answer anything reasonable here as your comment about how we control companies "through our dollars," shows a rather complete lack of understanding about politics and economics. I'm just pointing out the giant gaping hole in your argument/ideology with the arctic wind raging through it.

Americans are always going on about the evils of big government but they let huge, un-elected corporations rule the country (and most of the rest of the world), essentially unchecked and without even guidelines as to how these entities are supposed to act, let alone actual rules and regulations.

Americans are always also going on about "freedom" and letting the people decide what they want to do for themselves, but individual american citizens have demonstrably fewer freedoms than European or Canadian citizens, and no protection at all from corporate "mega-citizens who actually enjoy more rights and freedoms than the people themselves.

Hear hear.
post #139 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Well, you're the one who wanted to play the "what if..." game. But it's not a bigger "what if", and it's the whole point of looking at Google's dumping practices. Using their profits from search, they give products away to poison the market for others, classic anti-competitive behavior.

But, maybe you don't know the meaning of MO -- i.e., Method of Operation -- which is essentially an analysis of past actions, not future.

So *what if* is meaningless if postulated by others, but not by you?

If you want to believe someone doesn't understand MO in order to score a point, go ahead. That really doesn't bother me. According to Dr. David, I also don't know what a mixed metaphor is, I am either some kind of idiot or the debating skills around here are reduced to .... sophomoric levels

As for whether Google is *dumping* and being anti-competitive, as mentioned above, it is an interesting perspective. Is Amazon dumping too by selling the Fire (maybe the other Kindles too) at a loss? I don't know ... seriously.

EDIT: Just occurred to me .... what about giving away iTunes? I don't mean just the program itself. Apple has proclaimed more than once that it breaks even on iTunes operations. But that's ok for them as long as this leads to more device sales. Is this dumping too? Is this dramatically different from, dare I say, Google's MO? I don't know ... seriously. I need to look up MO first, not to mention mixed metaphors. Keeping company with intellectual giants gives me so much homework ....
post #140 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by drobforever View Post

The stupid media created a fake target for Google to get away with this prob. Siri is not a threat to Google search as I've said in another thread, what Siri can do right now, are stuffs you won't want to use Google search for. Sad.

Tell that to Schmidt then, he's the one stating that "Siri is a threat to Google" in front of a senate hearing.

So is he lying?
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post #141 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

You forgot to mention... Governor Moonbeam *

I'm always amazed when people make derogatory comments about elected officials. Seems like the bigger the landslide defeat the louder they critize. It is not like he is any different than last time he was governor. The voters knew full well what they were getting.

Democracy has its advantages and disadvantages. Unfortunately for Repulicans, mostly disadvantages because they are in the minority.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #142 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I'm always amazed when people make derogatory comments about elected officials. Seems like the bigger the landslide defeat the louder they critize. It is not like he is any different than last time he was governor. The voters knew full well what they were getting.

Democracy has its advantages and disadvantages. Unfortunately for Repulicans, mostly disadvantages because they are in the minority.

Agreed.

But a question - are Republicans really in the minority? Particularly outside of regions where the educated masses live?
post #143 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

Agreed.

But a question - are Republicans really in the minority? Particularly outside of regions where the educated masses live?

The undecided are the biggest factor in all regions and they are primarily motivated by current events which is why it is essential for Republicans to try to put the blame for economic struggles on the Dems totally denying any responsibility, even though the whole system colapsed under their watch and was a problem the current adminstration largely inherited due to Republican mistakes.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #144 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

To all those accusing Google of copying Apple, consider this:

Did Apple copy Google (and many others) by entering the Cloud computing field?

Did Apple copy Google by adding speech recognition (even if they executed it better)?

It's a slippery slope.

Was Apple iTools launched in 2000, "cloud" computing?

Hey look, a talking computer
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #145 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

To all those accusing Google of copying Apple, consider this:

Did Apple copy Google (and many others) by entering the Cloud computing field?

Did Apple copy Google with its iOS5 notification scheme?

Did Apple copy Google by adding speech recognition (even if they executed it better)?

Copying doesn't matter if it doesn't violate others rights.
Did Apple violate the intellectual property rights of others by doing the above?

"Voice Control" was released well over 2 years ago, in iOS3, by the way.

Has Google kept out of the smartphone manufacturing market because they'd be violating many more Apple patents?
Did Google stop selling smartphones on-line because they'd be in violation of the Video Privacy Protection Act of 1988--the same act Netflix was hoping to avoid violating by splitting off its mail-order business?
post #146 of 232
Siri could probably answer the senators' questions more straight-forwardly than Schmidt.
post #147 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

You'd want such a system to automatically close doors and seal them because air traveling from one room to another can cause the HVAC system to "fight itself" trying to keep one room warm and the other cold.

But realistically, how much variance do you have from room to room in a house? I think you can over complicate the whole thing. I have a basic programmable unit and I never need to adjust a thing except when I go on holiday. I love the look of this system but I suspect it tries to creta a need. It's like a dishwasher. It's great to have 24 programs but I suspect 90 percent of people never change program. The once that do only select rinse or power wash once in a while.
post #148 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

I have a basic programmable unit and I never need to adjust a thing except when I go on holiday. I love the look of this system but I suspect it tries to create a need.

But is your system programmed optimally? If you stick to the same schedule on a weekly basis maybe it is, but as they note most people don't set their programmable thermostat and those that do still have to fight with fluctuating schedules that won't get updated to the thermostat.

I think Nest is the future. That doesn't mean that all will be so attractive or expensive. I see no reason for others to not already be copying how Nest works so they can cash in on this other premium and budget models the same way programmable thermostats took over the average home after first being a very expensive.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #149 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

To be fair, why isnt the Senate committee grilling Apple with its monopolistic market share of the Tablet market?

Because unlike Google with Search, Apple doesn't dump free services to drive out competitors and then jack up the prices.

Most recent example - Google Maps API - was free, now through TOS change huge impact to those using Google Maps API.

Quote:
Double standard?

No double standard, just ignorance of what should be simple concepts such as "Monopoly"

Quote:
Dont get your hopes up too high Apple fans, because the yard stick to a competitive landscape in the eyes of the Senators is anyone having greater than 90% of any market is deemed a monopoly.

Ridiculous. If anything, when there are demonstrated and egregious examples of truly monopolistic behavior the government is often way more in the "too little, way too late" camp - i.e. Microsoft with DOS and Windows (DOS isn't done until Lotus won't run)...

Quote:
Apple should be next on target.

For idiotic, rampant and completely baseless speculation? Too late - we are already here
post #150 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aizmov View Post

I switch to Bing every now and then and it is getting better.

I switched to Bing last much and it's far more useful. First of all, the number of blatantly ad-placed results are dramatically less!

Every once in a while I will cross check with a Google search, but I have yet to find any compelling reason to switch back to Google. Other than forgetting and going there out of habit
post #151 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

Surprisingly off topic.

That you would state that just shows how either completely ignorant you are, or deliberately obtuse you are being.

Which is it?

Because his points are far from off topic. They go to the old adage that matters the most - especially for understanding motivation of why people or organizations do things: "Follow the money".
post #152 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

Not agreeing that iPad is a monopoly. But playing devils advocate- windows was in trouble for using IE exclusively and not installing any other web browser (although you could download it later).

Actually, a very important point of clarification - Microsoft PREVENTED OEMs from installing other browsers. Even if the other browser makers wanted to pay them - otherwise Microsoft threatened to cut them off from being able to source Windows - basically putting them out of business.

Apple does no such thing. There is only one configuration of an iOS device and it's the same for all users, and you can easily download third party software out of the box.

Quote:
iOS 5 on iPad and iPhone only use safari exclusively... So that is a pretty similar parallel.

Except for the part about MS threatening to basically bankrupt an OEM by not selling them Windows if they bundled third party browsers with their computers.

Quote:
Either way, I'm not a fan of anti-trust stuff... Kind of bugs me on a philosophical standpoint (no need for someone to argue their point)

Well, you should be a fan of it. Because while I don't think it needs to be tossed about as casually as it is in forums like these, the fact that it exists does keep companies at least a little in check. Just go back and read earlier American history re:Standard Oil and you will see the necessity of anti-trust (and I am DEFINITELY not a big-governmant person - I am for a weak central government as advocated by our constitution and the founding fathers)
post #153 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

Copying doesn't matter if it doesn't violate others rights.
Did Apple violate the intellectual property rights of others by doing the above?

"Voice Control" was released well over 2 years ago, in iOS3, by the way.

Has Google kept out of the smartphone manufacturing market because they'd be violating many more Apple patents?
Did Google stop selling smartphones on-line because they'd be in violation of the Video Privacy Protection Act of 1988--the same act Netflix was hoping to avoid violating by splitting off its mail-order business?

You're absolutely right, of course - rights are important. That brings up an example I have cited here before: iBooks, which looks like Delicious Library. The developer of that latter certainly felt his rights were violated, and did not receive recognition or compensation from Apple: http://twitter.com/#!/wilshipley/status/8289716016

What's my point? Very simple - Apple is hardly merely a victim when it comes to willful violation of IP rights. Sometimes, they buy their way out of it after the fact. Sometimes, they don't even bother.
post #154 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post

That you would state that just shows how either completely ignorant you are, or deliberately obtuse you are being.

Which is it?

Because his points are far from off topic. They go to the old adage that matters the most - especially for understanding motivation of why people or organizations do things: "Follow the money".

So which is it - Absolute D? Are you ignorant or obtuse? Oops, sorry, I got it wrong. Are you completely ignorant or deliberately obtuse? It has to be one or the other. It cannot be partly ignorant or inadvertently obtuse. Which is it? Inquiring minds want to know!!
post #155 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

The undecided are the biggest factor in all regions and they are primarily motivated by current events which is why it is essential for Republicans to try to put the blame for economic struggles on the Dems totally denying any responsibility, even though the whole system colapsed under their watch and was a problem the current adminstration largely inherited due to Republican mistakes.

*Undecided* has to do with voting. I'm thinking of card-carrying Republicans. Now, this group is going to be lower than 50% of Americans and is therefore a minority in that sense. But I am thinking of minority in the qualitative sense of how small are they, in reality? How many Americans believe in lower taxes, rights to owning machine guns, abolishing abortion, allowing oil rigs all along the coastlines, removing all environmental regulations, etc.?
post #156 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

You're absolutely right, of course - rights are important. That brings up an example I have cited here before: iBooks, which looks like Delicious Library. The developer of that latter certainly felt his rights were violated, and did not receive recognition or compensation from Apple

What intellectual property rights did Apple violate with iBooks? Answer specifically in terms of the law, not how the Delicious Library author feels.

Quote:
What's my point? Very simple - Apple is hardly merely a victim when it comes to willful violation of IP rights. Sometimes, they buy their way out of it after the fact. Sometimes, they don't even bother.

There is simply no comparison between Apple and Google.
Google is king of IP violations.
post #157 of 232
You brought tears to my eyes. Somebody gets it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

So, why is "big government" (that the citizen has some modicum of control over), a bad thing and "big corporations" (which the citizen has no control at all over), "good."

I don't really expect you to answer anything reasonable here as your comment about how we control companies "through our dollars," shows a rather complete lack of understanding about politics and economics. I'm just pointing out the giant gaping hole in your argument/ideology with the arctic wind raging through it.

Americans are always going on about the evils of big government but they let huge, un-elected corporations rule the country (and most of the rest of the world), essentially unchecked and without even guidelines as to how these entities are supposed to act, let alone actual rules and regulations.

Americans are always also going on about "freedom" and letting the people decide what they want to do for themselves, but individual american citizens have demonstrably fewer freedoms than European or Canadian citizens, and no protection at all from corporate "mega-citizens who actually enjoy more rights and freedoms than the people themselves.
post #158 of 232
Most of the people here aren't seeing Schmidt's point. By using Siri people are bypassing the ads that google serves up which is Google's main moneymaker. The fact that siri uses google for data is immaterial.
post #159 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by franksmith22 View Post

Most of the people here aren't seeing Schmidt's point. By using Siri people are bypassing the ads that google serves up which is Google's main moneymaker. The fact that siri uses google for data is immaterial.

They see it all right. In fact, in another thread, many people were climbing over each other to claim how this is Apple's entry into search and how brilliant this was.

But they have to speak out of a different corner of the mouth here because the Apple fanboy guidebook stipulates that one must not agree with Eric Schmidt.
post #160 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by franksmith22 View Post

Most of the people here aren't seeing Schmidt's point. By using Siri people are bypassing the ads that google serves up which is Google's main moneymaker. The fact that siri uses google for data is immaterial.

1) Schmidt's point was to try to get the antitrust committee from seeing the dominance of Google's search. Whether Google has an ill-gotten advantage or abused their position I can't say.

2) As previously noted Siri isn't pulling up any Google searches. The only thing that is pulling from Google is Maps, which is a separate set of APIs that is already built into the iOS Maps app.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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  • Google Chairman Eric tells US senators Apple's Siri could pose 'competitive threat'
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