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Google Chairman Eric tells US senators Apple's Siri could pose 'competitive threat' - Page 2

post #41 of 232
Google promised Apple NOT to enter the phone business and Apple promised Google NOT to enter the search business.

Google did not fulfill their promise. What is Google talking about now? They have what they deserve.
post #42 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Bill Gates gave antitrust regulators the same self-serving argument: Apple is proof Microsoft doesn't have an OS monopoly. And this was BEFORE iOS.

Which is why Microsoft was found guilty of being a Monopoly and it took the Bush Administration and a 250k fine to keep Microsoft from being broken up, all due to the heavy lobbying effort by Microsoft and all it's Government ties.

Microsoft has become a relic and might rethink their approach to being broken up if given a do over.
post #43 of 232
To be fair, Google simply offers a better product and superior experience in terms of search. It's the widespread goes-without-saying integration with other platforms and products that gives it an unfair advantage. They need to tone it down a bit.

Personally I don't care about Google's monopoly status. If it works for consumers and gives us a better experience, great. What worries me is how this ties into privacy violations and selling things that people didn't think could be sold. Essentially the public is giving away something of value and Google turns around and sells it. Not really cool.
post #44 of 232
Hey Eric, you forgot to remove the knife from Steve Job's back before he passed away.

Nice try quoting Android vs all of iOS. You'd otherwise be touting Android vs iPhone, no?
post #45 of 232
Is it illegal to win in the US now? What a strange place.
post #46 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Is it illegal to win in the US now? What a strange place.

Nope, it's still legal. Charlie Sheen is cruising along quite well.
post #47 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Okay, he's talking to an antitrust committee. Does that mean Google's being searched for having a search monopoly?

Is he claiming Siri is a competitor in this field, ending the monopoly?

Because Siri only uses Wolfram|Alpha for conversions and whatnot. Google is still used for everything else

Agree, he is making it sound worse than it is, and lowering expectations at the same time.
post #48 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Is it illegal to win in the US now? What a strange place.

Agreed!

Tallest Skil:


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"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

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Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

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post #49 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

Google promised Apple NOT to enter the phone business and Apple promised Google NOT to enter the search business.

Google did not fulfill their promise. What is Google talking about now? They have what they deserve.

This promise is documented? Apple knew since at least 2005. Why didn't they seem to mind until 2008?
post #50 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by robogobo View Post

To be fair, Google simply offers a better product and superior experience in terms of search. It's the widespread goes-without-saying integration with other platforms and products that gives it an unfair advantage. They need to tone it down a bit.

That's partially true. Google offered a better product and experience. However, now that Apple is offering something that might supersede Google's experience, Google is trying to manipulate the government to extend their position.

Quote:
Originally Posted by robogobo View Post

Personally I don't care about Google's monopoly status. If it works for consumers and gives us a better experience, great. What worries me is how this ties into privacy violations and selling things that people didn't think could be sold. Essentially the public is giving away something of value and Google turns around and sells it. Not really cool.

The problem is that your view is very short-sighted. Mussolini got the trains running on time, too. If Google had stuck to providing search results, no one would have any objection. But they are growing their power and using their monopoly in one arena to extend to attempting to strengthen their position in unrelated markets - which is illegal in the U.S. That's what Microsoft got in trouble for.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

Surprisingly civil discussion so far involving the Anti-Chri...I mean Google...sorry I get confused when I come on these boards...

You'd swear sometimes that Google supported Osama. -_-

Your lack of an intelligent argument and attempt to turn the discussion into something stupid and unrelated is noted.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

Anywho, I don't see how Google is in violation of Anti-Trust laws.

Of course not. Google pays you to tell everyone they're perfect.

Besides, you admit below that you don't know anything about the law, so why would anyone care whether you think Google is breaking the law?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

Buzz probably as you were automatically enrolled in that craptastic attempt at a social network simply by having Gmail.

But I was never forced to join any of their services except that.

The only thing they do is create more products that compete in more markets and try and expand their business...

Not unlike Apple.

Like with tablets, mp3 players, computers, phones, TV boxes, and probably TVs in the future you are free to buy another item. If Apple is what you prefer then you buy it.

It's entirely unlike Apple. Google is using a monopoly in one area to leverage its way into new markets - which is illegal. Apple has never had a monopoly in any area and can therefore not be said to have done that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

Like someone said if Apple forced you to have a Mac in order to use other Apple products then they'd have a problem.

I don't need Gmail, G+, Youtube, etc to use search (or any other item)

I don't see how they are in violation but I'm not that savvy on the laws at play.

Then stop commenting on things that you don't understand.
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post #51 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post


I don't need Gmail, G+, Youtube, etc to use search (or any other item)

I don't see how they are in violation but I'm not that savvy on the laws at play.

The first thing you have to understand is that you are not Google's customer. You are their product. Google's customer's are companies that use their products (not services) to serve advertisements to their products.

With this lens in place, you can now understand why none of your examples really mean anything. You are looking at the wrong relationships. You are looking at the Google-product relationship and not the Google-customer relationship.

When you look at the various Google-customer relationships, things look really different. Suppose you are a handset manufacture that wants to use a higher quality location service on your handset. Guess what, Google uses their power in mobile-OS to force manufactures to use their specific location service. There are dozens of examples when you look at Google's relationships with their customers that mirror this example.
post #52 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

That's partially true. Google offered a better product and experience. However, now that Apple is offering something that might supersede Google's experience, Google is trying to manipulate the government to extend their position.



The problem is that your view is very short-sighted. Mussolini got the trains running on time, too. If Google had stuck to providing search results, no one would have any objection. But they are growing their power and using their monopoly in one arena to extend to attempting to strengthen their position in unrelated markets - which is illegal in the U.S. That's what Microsoft got in trouble for.



Your lack of an intelligent argument and attempt to turn the discussion into something stupid and unrelated is noted.



Of course not. Google pays you to tell everyone they're perfect.

Besides, you admit below that you don't know anything about the law, so why would anyone care whether you think Google is breaking the law?



It's entirely unlike Apple. Google is using a monopoly in one area to leverage its way into new markets - which is illegal. Apple has never had a monopoly in any area and can therefore not be said to have done that.



Then stop commenting on things that you don't understand.

You feel better about yourself now that that attack of a response is over?

Are you implying that me not being an expert on anti-trust laws disallows me to comment on a message board teeming with other non experts offering opinions? (You are arguing this)

Hilarious.

Ignore me like the rest of these people have if my opinions are so irksome that you are completely incapable of refraining from spewing childishness thinly veiled by mature prose.
post #53 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

The first thing you have to understand is that you are not Google's customer. You are their product. Google's customer's are companies that use their products (not services) to serve advertisements to their products.

With this lens in place, you can now understand why none of your examples really mean anything. You are looking at the wrong relationships. You are looking at the Google-product relationship and not the Google-customer relationship.

When you look at the various Google-customer relationships, things look really different. Suppose you are a handset manufacture that wants to use a higher quality location service on your handset. Guess what, Google uses their power in mobile-OS to force manufactures to use their specific location service. There are dozens of examples when you look at Google's relationships with their customers that mirror this example.

Surprisingly off topic.
post #54 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Oh, when I GO to Dashboard, the yellow box underneath wherever my mouse was in, say, Safari, shows up on the Dashboard and doesn't go away until I go back out and move my mouse BACK OVER whatever it was to dismiss the box.

Sorry off topic ... I can't reproduce this at all. Does this happen if you boot in after a safe boot, i.e. holding the shift key at start up?
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post #55 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Grain of Salt View Post

There is no law against having a monopoly. The problem is if you abuse that monopoly. At this stage people are just buying more of Apple's tablet because they want to; Apple isn't forcing them.

So show us all where the abuse comes in and we may listen. At this stage your words are just fragments in the wind.

Not agreeing that iPad is a monopoly. But playing devils advocate- windows was in trouble for using IE exclusively and not installing any other web browser (although you could download it later). iOS 5 on iPad and iPhone only use safari exclusively... So that is a pretty similar parallel.

Either way, I'm not a fan of anti-trust stuff... Kind of bugs me on a philosophical standpoint (no need for someone to argue their point)

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post #56 of 232
Apple couldn't compete effectively in search because being effective in search requires a lot of information. Google has a lot. Microsoft was struggling at first because of the lack of information. As it gathers more information, its engine is becoming quite competitive. It currently is my default engine.

Currently, Siri uses the default search engine on iOS, which I suspect many people have set as Google. Google still gains information from the search, but I don't think Siri shows the ads. Apple, however, will be gaining a lot of information on 1) people's voice commands, and 2) what search results Google returns. What Google fears is Apple 1) not showing the ads, 2) denying it information when it uses third party apps such as Yelp to gain the data bypassing Google.

Keep in mind, however, Google has over a 90 percent market share everywhere else in the world. In the US it is in the 70 percent range. Apple's Siri doesn't' work in most other Countries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

And this is the whole point. I love it. Apple really should get into search. They won't, but they should. Just to piss Google off.
post #57 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

This promise is documented? Apple knew since at least 2005. Why didn't they seem to mind until 2008?

Documented by Steve Jobs recorded on video. Search the Internet for it.
post #58 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Currently, Siri uses the default search engine on iOS, which I suspect many people have set as Google. Google still gains information from the search, but I don't think Siri shows the ads.

I still don't see any search results showing up in Siri's screen that are from Google, Bing, Yahoo! or any of the default search engines you choose for Safari. The only time that looks to come into play is when Siri can't parse the info from Yahoo! for weather, Wolfram-Alpha for calculations, or Yelp for reviews that it will then give you a way to search in Safari which will, of course, show ads as the search provider intends.

Again, the only Google service I can find that Siri parses is Google Maps, but that's already a part of Maps in iOS, not something above and beyond the search the previous iPhones offered.
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post #59 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Apple couldn't compete effectively in search because being effective in search requires a lot of information. Google has a lot. Microsoft was struggling at first because of the lack of information. As it gathers more information, its engine is becoming quite competitive. It currently is my default engine.

Currently, Siri uses the default search engine on iOS, which I suspect many people have set as Google. Google still gains information from the search, but I don't think Siri shows the ads. Apple, however, will be gaining a lot of information on 1) people's voice commands, and 2) what search results Google returns. What Google fears is Apple 1) not showing the ads, 2) denying it information when it uses third party apps such as Yelp to gain the data bypassing Google.

Keep in mind, however, Google has over a 90 percent market share everywhere else in the world. In the US it is in the 70 percent range. Apple's Siri doesn't' work in most other Countries.

isearch , if apple is going to enter the search business, it will take some time and i bet that you will only be able to do it in apple's products. spotlight is great, they can do it (with time). As time goes by and more people enter into apple's ecosystem (iPhone than a mac, iPad then a mac, iPhone iPad mac) it can really make apple a much bigger company (with isearch). they would really be fighting everywhere, with one little detail... what apple is doing is almost the same as ferrari outselling or fighting for sales directly mercedes, bmw, audi, fiat, using their own fuel, etc. do people realize how great this is?

basically we are going to a strange place.. a place where when you buy a computer, tablet, smartphone tv etc, the real question won't be if that product comes from hp, samsung, dell, apple, sony etc.

the real question will be: Apple (good, stylish, great) or not(meh)?

p.s: waiting for apple to reinvent fridges, microwaves, and kick samsung's arse everywhere. lol
post #60 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaroonMushroom View Post

Like what... Phones?

So... Google can't spend the money they make from searches? Are they forced to give it away or just sit on it?

Well since other mobile OS charges phone makers a license fee, all of a sudden Google gives it away for free. Free does sound better for phone makers.
post #61 of 232
Microsoft was in trouble because it used it monopoly in the OS market to compete unfairly in another market, namely the internet browser market. Netscape was the market leader. It created the internet browser. It didn't have other products yet. It had to pay to develop Netscape, and so it had to charge for the product. Microsoft felt threatened by Netscape and gave Explorer away for free. The only reason it could do that is because of the money it was making with Windows and Office. Moreover, Microsoft pressured companies like Dell and HP to install Explorer as the default by threatening to revoke its bulk purchasing discounts it received from Microsoft on the sale of Windows and Office.

Google is arguably doing the same thing with some services like Places, which Google borrowed the idea from Yelp. When a company does a search on Google, it puts its own Places above in the search rankings and even uses Yelp's information in its own Place's service thereby denying Yelp ad revenue all the while benefiting from Yelp's user reviews. Google is doing the same thing with its new Groupon competitor as well.

Microsoft and Google's actions kill innovation. Why create something, when a company like Microsoft or Google is going to use its leverage in another market to kill your product?

Having a monopoly in and of itself is not bad. Apple arguably had a monopoly in music players. It, however, hasn't used that monopoly to gain a competitive advantage in another unrelated market. Your examples about Safari are not relevant because Apple doesn't have a monopoly. Psystar unsuccessful tried to argue that Apple did have a monopoly, but lost.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

Not agreeing that iPad is a monopoly. But playing devils advocate- windows was in trouble for using IE exclusively and not installing any other web browser (although you could download it later). iOS 5 on iPad and iPhone only use safari exclusively... So that is a pretty similar parallel.

Either way, I'm not a fan of anti-trust stuff... Kind of bugs me on a philosophical standpoint (no need for someone to argue their point)
post #62 of 232
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post #63 of 232
If Apple did search, I would probably use it because it would likely be ad free. I also would buy an Apple washer and dryer. Samsung seems to like copying LG in the washer and dryer markets; Sharp in the TV market; etc..

Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

isearch , if apple is going to enter the search business, it will take some time and i bet that you will only be able to do it in apple's products. spotlight is great, they can do it (with time). As time goes by and more people enter into apple's ecosystem (iPhone than a mac, iPad then a mac, iPhone iPad mac) it can really make apple a much bigger company (with isearch). they would really be fighting everywhere, with one little detail... what apple is doing is almost the same as ferrari outselling or fighting for sales directly mercedes, bmw, audi, fiat, using their own fuel, etc. do people realize how great this is?

basically we are going to a strange place.. a place where when you buy a computer, tablet, smartphone tv etc, the real question won't be if that product comes from hp, samsung, dell, apple, sony etc.

the real question will be: Apple (good, stylish, great) or not(meh)?

p.s: waiting for apple to reinvent fridges, microwaves, and kick samsung's arse everywhere. lol
post #64 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

isearch , if apple is going to enter the search business, it will take some time and i bet that you will only be able to do it in apple's products. spotlight is great, they can do it (with time). As time goes by and more people enter into apple's ecosystem (iPhone than a mac, iPad then a mac, iPhone iPad mac) it can really make apple a much bigger company (with isearch). they would really be fighting everywhere, with one little detail... what apple is doing is almost the same as ferrari outselling or fighting for sales directly mercedes, bmw, audi, fiat, using their own fuel, etc. do people realize how great this is?

basically we are going to a strange place.. a place where when you buy a computer, tablet, smartphone tv etc, the real question won't be if that product comes from hp, samsung, dell, apple, sony etc.

the real question will be: Apple (good, stylish, great) or not(meh)?

p.s: waiting for apple to reinvent fridges, microwaves, and kick samsung's arse everywhere. lol

On your last point... It seems a no brainer to me that I'l be able to ask Siri one day to alter the AC setting in the house or ask her to turn the oven on as soon as I get a few miles from home etc ... Manufacturers of many appliances must be talking to Apple about integration ... you'd think.
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post #65 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

On your last point... It seems a no brainer to me that I'l be able to ask Siri one day to alter the AC setting in the house or ask her to turn the oven on as soon as I get a few miles from home etc ... Manufacturers of many appliances must be talking to Apple about integration ... you'd think.

Speaking of adjusting your home's thermostat…

»

http://www.nest.com/living-with-nest/index.html Ain't that just the coolest thing? I had once thought of getting into this business to make the home HVAC smarter and more energy efficient. I'd like to eventually see that homes that can control the vents to each room/quadrant so that rooms can be individually controlled without needing individual heating and A/C units, just individual system controls.


Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

On a related but tangential issue ... I use Google's pubic DNS in my home network, I set it up eons ago back when Google and Apple were best buddies and totally forgot till reading this thread about cutting off Google's tentacles. Is changing this a good idea and if so what's the best DNS to use these days?

You're asking the wrong person on this one. I always assumed there were pros and cons with performance when using Google's DNS and that it would slow as more users hopped on board so I never tried it.
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post #66 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I still don't see any search results showing up in Siri's screen that are from Google, Bing, Yahoo! or any of the default search engines you choose for Safari. The only time that looks to come into play is when Siri can't parse the info from Yahoo! for weather, Wolfram-Alpha for calculations, or Yelp for reviews that it will then give you a way to search in Safari which will, of course, show ads as the search provider intends.

Again, the only Google service I can find that Siri parses is Google Maps, but that's already a part of Maps in iOS, not something above and beyond the search the previous iPhones offered.

On a related but tangential issue ... I use Google's pubic DNS in my home network, I set it up eons ago back when Google and Apple were best buddies and totally forgot till reading this thread about cutting off Google's tentacles. Is changing this a good idea and if so what's the best DNS to use these days?
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post #67 of 232
Why is this news? Schmidt is talking to an anti-trust subcommittee in an attempt to convince them that Google is NOT a monopoly. Obviously his statements are going to be "Google is small, we're not that big". Well DUH! I hate this kind of "news" because it is not news!
post #68 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Speaking of adjusting your home's thermostat…

»

http://www.nest.com/living-with-nest/index.html Ain't that just the coolest thing? I had once thought of getting into this business to make the home HVAC smarter and more energy efficient. I'd like to eventually see that homes that can control the vents to each room/quadrant so that rooms can be individually controlled without needing individual heating and A/C units, just individual system controls.




You're asking the wrong person on this one. I always assumed there were pros and cons with performance when using Google's DNS and that it would slow as more users hopped on board so I never tried it.

I saw that a week or two ago ... very nice and yes there is more to it still to be done along the lines you mention. Rooms that are not used or allowing for the differentials in rooms due to sun exposure. One thermostat in one location cannot be the solution for an entire house. This company need to look at a network and as you say have room by room controls.

I am thinking Google's free DNS has Machiavellian purposes now
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post #69 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZREOSpecialist View Post

Why is this news? Schmidt is talking to an anti-trust subcommittee in an attempt to convince them that Google is NOT a monopoly. Obviously his statements are going to be "Google is small, we're not that big". Well DUH! I hate this kind of "news" because it is not news!

Obviously it is political posturing for Google's own and best interests. However, the cool thing for Apple is this adds news worthy marketing hype for Siri and kind of kicks the Fandroids, who claim it is a toy or they had it first, in the balls.
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post #70 of 232
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post #71 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

This company need to look at a network and as you say have room by room controls.

They are networkable with WiFi. The only problem is the way homes are currently set up with HVAC usually only allowing for one thermostat (though sometimes two for homes that split HVAC into two handlers with common areas and bedrooms) unlike the more sophisticated systems found in large facilities.
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post #72 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

...The only thing [Google does] is create more products that compete in more markets and try and expand their business...

Not unlike Apple. ...

It's unlike Apple because Google uses its dominance (i.e., profits) in search to leverage itself into other markets by dumping (i.e., giving away for free) products in other markets to achieve dominance there as well. That's classic monopolistic behavior and not at all how Apple operates.
post #73 of 232
Personally I think the Windows web browser monopoly accusations was just stupid. It should be a feature provided by the OS just like a file browser is a feature. When Windows first offered a file browser we didn't see other DOS file browser manufacturers winning lawsuits. Second, Microsoft never prevented other browsers from being installed. It mainly seemed like the under dog complaining because they couldn't build a better browser. Case in point, Google built a better browser and now they are making a serious dent in the IE market share.

The one thing that Microsoft did justifiably get in trouble for, in the early days, was licensing Windows at a reduced price per all PCs sold rather per copy of Windows sold. Meaning that even if an OEM installed OS/2 instead of Windows, they had to pay both IBM and Microsoft for an OS license. It kept OS/2, Linux, and a few other emerging OSs from really breaking into the market. The alternative was to license Windows at twice the price which of course put an OEM at a competitive disadvantage with other Windows only OEMs.

As for Google abusing monopoly power there hasn't been anything quite so obvious. The internet is an excellent equalizer in that it's simple for anyone else to compete if they have the brains to build something better.

Google products could be looked at as one large computer program linked by a single user interface (ie. the main search engine). Claiming for example that another mapping site isn't making money because Google Maps takes all of their business would be like saying Microsoft can't build a spell checker into Office because it prevents stand alone spell checkers from competing.

Just about every argument against Google seems to be along those lines.
post #74 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

maybe if your statement didn't come across as crazy, fanatical ramblings of someone with a psychological disorder attaching themselves to a horrific event for some attention you would be taken more seriously when you've posted this same drivel for 4 years.

If you were for real, had a case or anything that resembled a case that ties schmidt to the unfortunate death of may zhou i'd expect your lawyers and the authorities would have had you shut the fuck up about it in public.

nice !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
post #75 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Is it illegal to win in the US now? What a strange place.

Are you asking the android fans who keep talking about Apple's so-called tablet monopoly?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #76 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

Google promised Apple NOT to enter the phone business and Apple promised Google NOT to enter the search business.

Google did not fulfill their promise. What is Google talking about now? They have what they deserve.

Can you point us to the source documenting such promises?
post #77 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Speaking of adjusting your home's thermostat…

»

http://www.nest.com/living-with-nest/index.html Ain't that just the coolest thing? I had once thought of getting into this business to make the home HVAC smarter and more energy efficient. I'd like to eventually see that homes that can control the vents to each room/quadrant so that rooms can be individually controlled without needing individual heating and A/C units, just individual system controls.

I do love the Nest. Really cool idea. It may save me from nagging the kids for not turning down the thermostat when they leave for school. Just one thing that bugged me about the reviews - The reviewers fawned all over a product they have not tested and referred to it as Applesque because of the founders were from Apple, and because the round design is reminiscent of the scroll wheel on iPods. But to me, the round design is a nice digital twist on the classic round thermostat, down to the size of it. Regardless, I can't wait to buy it and hope it lives up to hype.
post #78 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

I do love the Nest. Really cool idea. It may save me from nagging the kids for not turning down the thermostat when they leave for school. Just one thing that bugged me about the reviews - The reviewers fawned all over a product they have not tested and referred to it as Applesque because of the founders were from Apple, and because the round design is reminiscent of the scroll wheel on iPods. But to me, the round design is a nice digital twist on the classic round thermostat, down to the size of it. Regardless, I can't wait to buy it and hope it lives up to hype.

I see it as Applesque in it's design from the HW to the SW, not because it had former Apple employees attached to it. If that were the case then Android and WebTV would be Applesque, which is about as far from the truth as you can get.

I just hope the auto-brightness feature is more effective than on the iPhone. I also hope they eventually make a model that can tie into power from the wall (with a battery inside incase you lose power) without the need to switch out batteries periodically.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #79 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I see it as Applesque in it's design from the HW to the SW, not because it had former Apple employees attached to it. If that were the case then Android and WebTV would be Applesque, which is about as far from the truth as you can get.

I just hope the auto-brightness feature is more effective than on the iPhone. I also hope they eventually make a model that can tie into power from the wall (with a battery inside incase you lose power) without the need to switch out batteries periodically.

I agree there is much that's Applesque about the simple UI and the hidden smarts. What I object to is the unilateral reference to the scroll wheel when, in fact, a classic thermostat is round (I believe the round design predates the rectangular ones?).
post #80 of 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterMingCao View Post

These are real happenings, but never a story. May Zhou was murdered, my life was endangered and Eric Schmidt lost his CEO position, everything I said had been investigated and confirmed by judicial authorities. Eric Schmidt and Sebastian Thrun already got Google's name into these anti-humanity crimes. They dare not deny these accusations to the public despite my public challenges, what's their problems? What's your questions then?

Be serious, please. Someone are afraid of my saying to the public and had banned my old account. Only losers would do that.

No... You were banned because you are sick and need professional psychiatric help.

http://articles.sfgate.com/2008-03-2...trunk-sleeping

Oh moderator!
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
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Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
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