or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Barnes & Noble to take on Kindle Fire, iPad with new $250 Nook Tablet
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Barnes & Noble to take on Kindle Fire, iPad with new $250 Nook Tablet

post #1 of 66
Thread Starter 
Barnes & Noble on Monday unveiled its next-generation Nook Tablet, a new 7-inch touchscreen device with a color screen that's a direct competitor to Amazon's new Kindle Fire.

At $249, the Nook Tablet features more power than the similarly sized Kindle Fire, with the latest Nook packing a 1GHz dual-core processor, 1GB of RAM, and 16GB of built-in internal storage. Barnes & Noble said its new Android-powered Nook, which arrives on Nov. 17, also boasts 11.5 hours of battery life.

"In Nook Tablet, we've created the best wireless media tablet in the portable 7-inch class," said Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch. "Nook Tablets VividView display has been designed to be the worlds finest screen for readability and viewing content. We've utilized that breakthrough display technology to bring consumers the largest digital catalog of color and interactive books, magazines, childrens books and high-quality apps through our NOOK Store.

"Additionally, weve seamlessly integrated todays top entertainment services like Netflix, Hulu Plus and Pandora in a product thats powerful, easy-to-use, under a pound, and a tremendous value at only $249."

The Nook Tablet's closest competitor will be the new Amazon Kindle Fire, another 7-inch touchscreen tablet powered by Android. Set to ship on Nov. 15, the Kindle Fire is available for preorder and carries a price of $199.

To compete with Amazon at that price point, Barnes & Noble also dropped the price of its previous-generation Nook Color to $199. Apple's entry-level 16GB, Wi-Fi-only iPad is $499, sporting a larger 9.7-inch display.

Speaking with USA Today, Lynch said that he doesn't view Apple's iPad as a direct competitor. Instead, he believes people will buy both an iPad and a Nook Tablet.

"Despite the fact (that Apple is) closing in on 40 million iPads in the U.S., the iBookstore is still a much smaller share of the overall market than is the Nook bookstore and the Kindle bookstore," he said. "That is because these devices, including Nook Color, have been optimized around the reading experience."



Apple executives indicated last week that they are not concerned with the forthcoming Amazon Kindle Fire. They believe that devices like the Kindle Fire and Nook Tablet will only fragment Google's Android platform, as both devices feature a custom user interface that masks the Android underpinnings of the devices.

And Amazon is already rumored to be looking beyond the forthcoming first-generation Kindle Fire, even before it becomes available. Numerous reports have suggested that the world's largest online retailer plans to adopt a larger screen size with future color touchscreen Kindles.
post #2 of 66
Is the 7" tablet really more optimal for reading than the iPad?

Over time, I wonder if it might turn into a hardcover vs. paperback comparison.
post #3 of 66
The Kindle Fire won't add to Android fragmentation because from the user's point of view it is not Android. It's looks and behaves like a proprietary platform.

Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

Reply

Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

Reply
post #4 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

The Kindle Fire won't add to Android fragmentation because from the user's point of view it is not Android. It's looks and behaves like a proprietary platform.

you're right. the Fire and Nook do not "fragment" Android. they "fork" it. and in fact compete directly with Google's version.
post #5 of 66
And yet the Lenovo A1 has better specs and a $199 price tag.


The 7" market is so overrun, no one will be able to tell any of them apart. And iPad will just let them have the tiny screen market. No use getting into that mess.
post #6 of 66
The Nook color looks like a good alternative to the iPod touch. I think I'll get one of these for the kids this christmas, mostly for netflix.

I'd really like to see a 5" iPod touch with the A5 and 32GB for $300.

Yeah, that's the same price as the current 32GB iPod touch...but it's still $50 more than the Nook and $100 more than the fire.
post #7 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

Is the 7" tablet really more optimal for reading than the iPad?

Over time, I wonder if it might turn into a hardcover vs. paperback comparison.

7 is nice sometimes. So is 6 and 8. 12 and 15 have some appeal too.

But fragmentation is too big a problem: best case, it only affects UI design, making some apps harder to use, even if the users never appreciate what theyre missing. Best case, it hurts profitability for developers having to spend time/money on the problem, and hurts longevity of devices that get abandoned, stop getting updates, and lose compatibility with new tablet app releasesor app releases for the wrong size screen. (Because its one more layer of complexity that makes everything harder to maintain.)

I can see Apple one day having more than two sizes, but not while the platform is young. Two sizes (full and pocket) is appropriate for now. And Googles strategy of suggesting that every app developer have their apps adapt automatically to all potential sizes sounds good... on paper, as a concept. But its another failure (Microsoft too is guilty) to realize that touch computing done right cannot be the same as traditional computing.

eBook readers are a special case, though: if all it does is read books, and does it well, thats enough if the price is low and the weight is far less than a real tablet! Thats why the e-Ink Kindle is still a great product in its own way.

Theres a bigger issue than screen size, though: widescreen sounds nice in an ad, and people will mindlessly throw money at buzzwords like that. But its not good for a tablet.

Its the best way to watch one thing: widescreen movies and recent TV series. Much of the video on the web is still 4:3, as are older TV series, so I wouldnt say widescreen is best for video viewing in general. Just for certain kinds of viewing. (Kinds youll probably do more often on a big screen, and only occasionally on a tablet.)

But its worse for most other things. Holding a tablet sideways with one hand is more tiring, so Apple wisely designed the iPad to be in portrait as its native orientation. But a widescreen display is just too narrow when held that way. And when held in landscape, theres too little vertical space for your content. Widescreen is too extreme. 4:3 is much more practical in both orientations.

In addition, for the same inches, widescreen means less area. A 10.1 Android tablet has fewer square inches than a 9.7 iPad. You can see how small the screen seems side by side.
post #8 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by airnerd View Post

And yet the Lenovo A1 has better specs and a $199 price tag.

Since when is a single core A8 better than a dual core A9? And it only has 2GB in board storage vs 16. The primary advantage it has is GPS.

The 7" market will be owned by the Fire and the Nook.
post #9 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by airnerd View Post

And yet the Lenovo A1 has better specs and a $199 price tag.


The 7" market is so overrun, no one will be able to tell any of them apart. And iPad will just let them have the tiny screen market. No use getting into that mess.

I agreed with this as well. Apple will not be interested in competing for lower profit margin market anyway. Apple refused to release and compete in low-end desktop computers for the same reason.
post #10 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

The Kindle Fire won't add to Android fragmentation because from the user's point of view it is not Android. It's looks and behaves like a proprietary platform.

Fragmentation is not primarily an issue "from the user's point of view"; it's a problem from the developers point of view, so new forks of Android will increase fragmentation, unless developers don't bother attempting to support it.

Also, "from the user's point of view", isn't Amazon claiming that apps from their Android marketplace will run on the Fire? (I could be mistaken about that.) If that's the case, then it is an issue "from the user's point of view".
post #11 of 66
In what way is the Nook (colour) and the Kindle Fire, for that matter, optimized for the reading experience beyond what the iPad is?
post #12 of 66
what we see here is the true emergence of a "basic small tablet" market at a low-end price point. especially the new Nook Tablet, which is a better thought out v.2 model of the v.1 Nook Color. its hardware is clearly more developed than the first Amazon Fire coming soon that is just a stripped down version of the failed Playbook's hardware (an improved Fire is reportedly coming early next year).

the Nook and Fire are not the first effort to address this market of course. Archos has been trying for two years. but the both the Fire and Nook bring ecosystems with them that Archos always lacked - Amazon's cloud and Barns & Nobles' retail stores. and both the Fire and Nook are proprietary "walled gardens" running forked versions of Android that, unlike Archos, don't depend on Google for anything. which means they are simpler/easier to use.

So this is very significant. the big question is of course, how popular will they be? we'll have to wait and see over the next year ... the general market viability of the 7" size is still very much in question.

and to get to this low-end price point, both the Fire and Nook sacrifice many features. no camera, 3G, or Bluetooth. does that matter? we'll see ...

but one thing, they will still very likely crowd out the high-end "full featured" Android 7" tablets, like the new Samsung Galaxy at $399, even if those run the latest ICS software. buyers that want all those capabilities might as well upgrade to a 2x bigger 10" screen for just $100 more, unless there is some unusual reason the smaller size works best for them (certainly not for just sitting on the sofa).

Apple is lacking a product for the tablet market between the 3.5" iPod touch and the 10" iPad. i think that is a mistake. a larger 5.5" version of the touch would be a great PGP (to complete with Sony's Vita and the 3DS), and still much more portable than a 7" tablet. and at $299 it would compete very well with this new batch of basic tablets, thanks to all of its much superior capabilities. maybe next year ...
post #13 of 66
Oh wow! Digging the super hero comic in the advert. Maybe I can buy a nook and have uber awesome comic readings in a digital form!

Only I have an iPad 2. So nuts to this.
/s


On a slightly less sarcastic note. Reading comics on a 7" screen is a nightmare - pan zoom city. At least the iPad2 is 4/5ths the size of a standard comic page - comics scale down but not so much they become uncomfortable to read.

I know comics is not the focus of this article but I'm in one of those moods and I felt like nit-picking the promotional image.

... at night.

Reply

... at night.

Reply
post #14 of 66
Steve Jobs said that the 7 inch form factor does not work for tablets

After having read many books using the iPad I tend to agree because even with the 10 inch screen I still find it a little bit too small. I find myself zooming in to read the sentences on occaisons- I imagine on the nook and the kindle fire it will be even worse. DOA


Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

Since when is a single core A8 better than a dual core A9? And it only has 2GB in board storage vs 16. The primary advantage it has is GPS.

The 7" market will be owned by the Fire and the Nook.

Originally by Rickers - 2014 : Cook & will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost so long.



 Originally Posted by  thataveragejoe :  Next week  Korea Times, "I'm gay too"-Samsung



 



Reply

Originally by Rickers - 2014 : Cook & will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost so long.



 Originally Posted by  thataveragejoe :  Next week  Korea Times, "I'm gay too"-Samsung



 



Reply
post #15 of 66
Awesome development in the portable tablet range. Just a year ago the Galaxy Tab was $600 with a single-core processor, no Netflix, and shorter battery life...
post #16 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

The Kindle Fire won't add to Android fragmentation because from the user's point of view it is not Android. It's looks and behaves like a proprietary platform.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

you're right. the Fire and Nook do not "fragment" Android. they "fork" it. and in fact compete directly with Google's version.

I'd glad this concept is catching on. The other day when this was an issue I couldn't get anyone to see that PoV.

It does, however, further fragment the tablet OS market which in turn does not help Android solidify into a proper choice for consumers (not that Google is helping with their efforts on iCS).
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #17 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul94544 View Post

Steve Jobs said that the 7 inch form factor does not work for tablets

After having read many books using the iPad I tend to agree because even with the 10 inch screen I still find it a little bit too small. I find myself zooming in to read the sentences on occaisons- I imagine on the nook and the kindle fire it will be even worse. DOA

I think Jobs was right and I think the biography stated what I mentioned 2 years ago about them trying various form factors to get the right fit. However, Apple was working with a full-on, versatile mobile OS while Amazon and B&N are using a much more limited, rangebound OS that I think works very well for customers looking for something just a little more media-capable than the standard eReader.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #18 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by airnerd View Post

And yet the Lenovo A1 has better specs and a $199 price tag.


The 7" market is so overrun, no one will be able to tell any of them apart. And iPad will just let them have the tiny screen market. No use getting into that mess.

It is interesting that Amazon lists the Lenovo A1 for $199 -- same as it's own Fire.

I wonder if Amazon will become a reseller for the Nook tablets...

I wonder if the Amazon Kindle Bookstore will be accessible to the Nook tablets (and vice versa)...

...thereby competing with its suppliers

"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #19 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

7 is nice sometimes. So is 6 and 8. 12 and 15 have some appeal too.

But fragmentation is too big a problem: best case, it only affects UI design, making some apps harder to use, even if the users never appreciate what theyre missing. Best case, it hurts profitability for developers having to spend time/money on the problem, and hurts longevity of devices that get abandoned, stop getting updates, and lose compatibility with new tablet app releasesor app releases for the wrong size screen. (Because its one more layer of complexity that makes everything harder to maintain.)

I can see Apple one day having more than two sizes, but not while the platform is young. Two sizes (full and pocket) is appropriate for now. And Googles strategy of suggesting that every app developer have their apps adapt automatically to all potential sizes sounds good... on paper, as a concept. But its another failure (Microsoft too is guilty) to realize that touch computing done right cannot be the same as traditional computing.

eBook readers are a special case, though: if all it does is read books, and does it well, thats enough if the price is low and the weight is far less than a real tablet! Thats why the e-Ink Kindle is still a great product in its own way.

Theres a bigger issue than screen size, though: widescreen sounds nice in an ad, and people will mindlessly throw money at buzzwords like that. But its not good for a tablet.

Its the best way to watch one thing: widescreen movies and recent TV series. Much of the video on the web is still 4:3, as are older TV series, so I wouldnt say widescreen is best for video viewing in general. Just for certain kinds of viewing. (Kinds youll probably do more often on a big screen, and only occasionally on a tablet.)

But its worse for most other things. Holding a tablet sideways with one hand is more tiring, so Apple wisely designed the iPad to be in portrait as its native orientation. But a widescreen display is just too narrow when held that way. And when held in landscape, theres too little vertical space for your content. Widescreen is too extreme. 4:3 is much more practical in both orientations.

In addition, for the same inches, widescreen means less area. A 10.1 Android tablet has fewer square inches than a 9.7 iPad. You can see how small the screen seems side by side.

Great post!
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #20 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

It is interesting that Amazon lists the Lenovo A1 for $199 -- same as it's own Fire.



I'd almost forgotten about the Lenovo, and with good reason: it still hasn't shipped, and I've yet to be able to fool with a display model to see if it's a yea or nay for $200. It could very well turn out to be a great deal but they won't be able to compete with the B & N kiosks with piles of in-stock Nook tablets being demoed. If the A1 doesn't show up just a few days after B & N loads does, in 10 days, they might as well call it off.

B & N are so saturated and have such a good kiosk presence that they drive home to even the casual shopper how frustrating it is to walk into a Best Buy or even J & R in NYC (which I like) and check out a dizzying assortment of half not-functioning tablets with salespeople who aren't versed in their interfaces. I'm no B & N or Nook fan, but I can walk into any B & N and play on the latest model for as long as I want, and get the right answer to a Nook question. At all of the stores here that sell tablets most are not functioning, at best they function but are not online, and some are visibly broken. Whatever the scenario, no demo.

I agree with those who see the Nook Tablet as a good iPodTouch upgrade/alternative, depending of course on what it actually feels like when it arrives. If you don't need the iTunes integration or to put it in your back pocket I can think of worse ways to spend $200 : )
post #21 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

In addition, for the same inches, widescreen means less area. A 10.1 Android tablet has fewer square inches than a 9.7 iPad. You can see how small the screen seems side by side.

The area of the Xoom is ~45.85 sq.inch, the iPad is ~45.16, so they are about the same. A perfect square with a 10'' diagonal would have a greater (50 sq.inch) area, but I doubt people would like that. I personally prefer the golden ratio as an excellent compromise between 16:9 widescreen and 4:3 "old TV".
post #22 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Great post!

yes, 4:3 is definitely more practically flexible/useable than Android's 16:10 aspect (and you can get a higher arch on those Angry Bird dive-bomb shots!). but how big a market effect that has we really can't tell. there are too many other factors involved at the same time to isolate just one. i don't trust "surveys" - you really can't decide what you prefer until after trying both out doing the same things for an extended period, and it will take years to accumulate such experience.
post #23 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

what we see here is the true emergence of a "basic small tablet" market at a low-end price point. especially the new Nook Tablet, which is a better thought out v.2 model of the v.1 Nook Color. its hardware is clearly more developed than the first Amazon Fire coming soon that is just a stripped down version of the failed Playbook's hardware (an improved Fire is reportedly coming early next year).

the Nook and Fire are not the first effort to address this market of course. Archos has been trying for two years. but the both the Fire and Nook bring ecosystems with them that Archos always lacked - Amazon's cloud and Barns & Nobles' retail stores. and both the Fire and Nook are proprietary "walled gardens" running forked versions of Android that, unlike Archos, don't depend on Google for anything. which means they are simpler/easier to use.

So this is very significant. the big question is of course, how popular will they be? we'll have to wait and see over the next year ... the general market viability of the 7" size is still very much in question.

and to get to this low-end price point, both the Fire and Nook sacrifice many features. no camera, 3G, or Bluetooth. does that matter? we'll see ...

but one thing, they will still very likely crowd out the high-end "full featured" Android 7" tablets, like the new Samsung Galaxy at $399, even if those run the latest ICS software. buyers that want all those capabilities might as well upgrade to a 2x bigger 10" screen for just $100 more, unless there is some unusual reason the smaller size works best for them (certainly not for just sitting on the sofa).

Apple is lacking a product for the tablet market between the 3.5" iPod touch and the 10" iPad. i think that is a mistake. a larger 5.5" version of the touch would be a great PGP (to complete with Sony's Vita and the 3DS), and still much more portable than a 7" tablet. and at $299 it would compete very well with this new batch of basic tablets, thanks to all of its much superior capabilities. maybe next year ...

I agree with everything except the last paragraph.

Some questions... let's assume that the Fire and new B&N tablets are successful. Some of this will be due to:

-- a forked stable version of Android
-- added proprietary functions to the basic Android OS
-- an infrastructure supporting content, apps, and to some extent developers

Conceivably, these 2 low-priced tablets could preempt other vendors' planned Android tablets -- to the point where there is little or no money to be made in the Android Tablet market.

Questions:

1) If Android tablets are not selling, does Google continue developing tablet-specific features past ICS?

2) Neither the Fire or the B&N will have ICS -- what happens in, say a year, when the forked Android OSes get a little long in the tooth?

3) What happens if Google loses its lawsuits and suppliers of these forked Android OSes (B&N And Amazon) must pay for the privilege?

4) What if early next year Apple announces the iPad 3 and continues to sell an iPad 1 and iPad 2 at reduced prices -- say $250-$299?

It appears, to me, that targeting these tablets at anything but book and movie consumption in the <$200 price range is pretty risky -- and provides a very small window of opportunity.

Thoughts?

"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #24 of 66
Maybe it is just me, but I don't find the current Nook Color responsive compare to current 10-in tablets. It could be OS issue or hardware. I find it slow compare to even 1st-gen iPad.

I think neither BN or Amazon will be honest enough to admit 7-in form is "optimized" for epub reading and not magazine/picture books or any pdf format books.
post #25 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

In what way is the Nook (colour) and the Kindle Fire, for that matter, optimized for the reading experience beyond what the iPad is?

If you look at the advertising for these 7" eBook/tablet devices they usually show a woman putting one into her handbag, that's because women buy significantly more books than men. So yes in a way the Kindle and Nook are more optimised for reading books, especially if you're a woman. They're also much lighter and easier to hold in one hand like a paper book.
post #26 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by airnerd View Post

And yet the Lenovo A1 has better specs and a $199 price tag.


The 7" market is so overrun, no one will be able to tell any of them apart. And iPad will just let them have the tiny screen market. No use getting into that mess.

Specs. That all these tablets have to offer, because none of them owns the user experience, except for the TouchPad and PlayBook. Apple iPad offers that, plus the whole iOS ecosystem.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #27 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techboy View Post

I agreed with this as well. Apple will not be interested in competing for lower profit margin market anyway. Apple refused to release and compete in low-end desktop computers for the same reason.

Big Lots! was advertising a $77 PanDigital brand 7" Android tablet. Junk, pure junk.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #28 of 66
I'm glad to see Amazon and B&N using IPS panels for their displays.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #29 of 66
I'd consider this as I use my iPad mostly for Netflix...but I'm looking at the feature list and am curious as to what "Exclusive design for remarkable clarity and minimal reflection & glare" actually means. Does it have a special coating?

That is my main gripe with the iPad, I could never use it outside if I wanted to.

I'm also mesmerized by the "hook" in the corner of the device, and not in a good way. What is it for...a strap? I love the sleek silver look but the notch is a distraction.
post #30 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I agree with everything except the last paragraph.

Some questions... let's assume that the Fire and new B&N tablets are successful. Some of this will be due to:

-- a forked stable version of Android
-- added proprietary functions to the basic Android OS
-- an infrastructure supporting content, apps, and to some extent developers

Conceivably, these 2 low-priced tablets could preempt other vendors' planned Android tablets -- to the point where there is little or no money to be made in the Android Tablet market.

Questions:

1) If Android tablets are not selling, does Google continue developing tablet-specific features past ICS?

2) Neither the Fire or the B&N will have ICS -- what happens in, say a year, when the forked Android OSes get a little long in the tooth?

3) What happens if Google loses its lawsuits and suppliers of these forked Android OSes (B&N And Amazon) must pay for the privilege?

4) What if early next year Apple announces the iPad 3 and continues to sell an iPad 1 and iPad 2 at reduced prices -- say $250-$299?

It appears, to me, that targeting these tablets at anything but book and movie consumption in the <$200 price range is pretty risky -- and provides a very small window of opportunity.

Thoughts?


i actually see the real competition for the iPod touch being Sony's Vita and Nintendo's 3DS, not any Android tablet at all. because games are the most important factor in the kids/teen market - equalled only by texting and, of course, the media player function. then the camera. but third party apps, not so much. other than games of course, where the touch has a huge price advantage vs. Sony/Nintendo.

i could be wrong, but i'd bet 2/3 of touch users are under 18. mostly bought by their parents?

so a somewhat larger screen is certainly even better for games and media. but a 5.5" size will still fit in many pockets - which is why Sony picked it for the Vita i suppose. 7" is simply getting too big tho - unless you're wearing cargo pants you need a pack or something to carry it.

and the ability of the touch to do a whole lot more, along with the full Apple ecosystem, is what would make a 5.5" version a very strong new contender against the new "basic tablets" like the Nook and Fire - and whatever Google Android products we see soon too. it would be running scaled-up iPhone apps along with cameras and all the rest. it would take a very big chunk of the under-$300 market.

i wondered why Apple did not update the iPod touch at all this year, except for iOS 5 of course. maybe the supply of A5 chips was just too tight thanks to the iPhone 4S. next year?
post #31 of 66
The original title of the article in Appleinsider says: "Barnes & Noble to take on Kindle Fire, iPad with new $250 Nook Tablet". However, nowhere in the article content can be inferred that, in fact, is quite the opposite.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Barnes & Noble on Monday unveiled its next-generation Nook Tablet, a new 7-inch touchscreen device with a color screen that's a direct competitor to Amazon's new Kindle Fire.

Speaking with USA Today, Lynch said that he doesn't view Apple's iPad as a direct competitor. Instead, he believes people will buy both an iPad and a Nook Tablet.
post #32 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

If you look at the advertising for these 7" eBook/tablet devices they usually show a woman putting one into her handbag, that's because women buy significantly more books than men. So yes in a way the Kindle and Nook are more optimised for reading books, especially if you're a woman. They're also much lighter and easier to hold in one hand like a paper book.

really good point. wouldn't surprise me at all if 2/3 of the buyers of the Fire/Nook turn out to be women. you're right, 7" is a good size for a handbag if nothing else. their simplicity is also a big selling point for women.
post #33 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post


the Nook and Fire are not the first effort to address this market of course. Archos has been trying for two years. but the both the Fire and Nook bring ecosystems with them that Archos always lacked - Amazon's cloud and Barns & Nobles' retail stores. and both the Fire and Nook are proprietary "walled gardens" running forked versions of Android that, unlike Archos, don't depend on Google for anything. which means they are simpler/easier to use.


The main reason Archos tablets will never succeed on any scale larger than their current one (smaller than miniscule) is that now they are selling to a market that is used to the customer service experience provided by Amazon, B & N and Apple, and that's not a reference to the "we'll fix it if it breaks" customer service. Most older Archos products are now doorstops because they sold them like radios or mp3 players at best, and Archos' support presence was like that of a hard drive manufacturer. That is, you would think they were hiding from you. Most people aren't crazy about how tied in one is to the "ecosystems" of any big 3 tablets, but that's how they provide a functioning experience. Pick your poison and enjoy it. "Simpler/easier to use" due to the closed aspect bothers many with good reason, but that's how it is. The days of good tablets NOT controlled by such a closed system is over, if it ever existed at all. Does anyone know someone who jumped on one of those early Archos releases who is considering a new one over these other options?

No company that thinks they only need to compete on the widget level has any chance in the $200 and up tablet category regardless of the specs of the widget. There's a big graveyard of tablets whose maker thought that.
post #34 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

really good point. wouldn't surprise me at all if 2/3 of the buyers of the Fire/Nook turn out to be women. you're right, 7" is a good size for a handbag if nothing else. their simplicity is also a big selling point for women.

Yes, weight and handbagging ability are great selling points for a reader. I can see Apple bring out a 7" model at some point in the future but it won't be competing for the low end of the market.

I see the biggest threat to Apple being Apple's success. How can Apple keep the iPad and iPhone/pod cool for younger people when their moms and dads, as well as their grandparents use the same things? At the moment it is working but at a certain point kids are going to need to differentiate. That's just human nature.
post #35 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

really good point. wouldn't surprise me at all if 2/3 of the buyers of the Fire/Nook turn out to be women. you're right, 7" is a good size for a handbag if nothing else. their simplicity is also a big selling point for women.

Yes, and also for one-handed use on a subway or bus during a commute. The 10" tablets only get pulled out pretty much when they get a seat, the smaller e-readers less so. I strap-hang with my iPod touch and wouldn't commute with a substitute that I couldn't navigate with the same hand that was holding it. Quite a specific niche I know, but... : )
post #36 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by benanderson89 View Post

Oh wow! Digging the super hero comic in the advert. Maybe I can buy a nook and have uber awesome comic readings in a digital form! ...

I know comics is not the focus of this article but I'm in one of those moods and I felt like nit-picking the promotional image.

My pet peve about digital comics (a much more interesting topic that the actual article), is that they just aren't available and those that are, are not available for a reasonable price. There is also a stupid app for every comic book distributor each with it's own built in store so you have to have a marvel app and a this app and a that app etc.

It's almost as if they purposely designed a digital comic distribution system that went out of it's way to screw over and confuse the customer at every stage. Most folks who read comics on an iPad therefore usually end up using a generic reader and ripping off the comics from torrents.

It's the music business all over again, but the market is so much smaller it will be years before these idiots figure out that they are putting up more barriers to digital distribution than they are helping it out. Torrented comics, especially the older ones, are all crappy scans and full of other garbage as well. There are tons of comics I would love to buy if they were actually available at a reasonable price.
post #37 of 66
I see everyone as expected in this thread is caught up with specifications. Good thing Steve never hung his every design based on speccs, but rather ease of use and high quality. Keep it up people, keep on touting speccs like it ever mattered in the design of Apple products, I'm sure devices with all these impressive speccs are selling out, and lines are being formed around the corner to pickup a kindle fire or any other crap android generic device.
post #38 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by zindako View Post

I see everyone as expected in this thread is caught up with specifications. Good thing Steve never hung his every design based on speccs, but rather ease of use and high quality. Keep it up people, keep on touting speccs like it ever mattered in the design of Apple products, I'm sure devices with all these impressive speccs are selling out, and lines are being formed around the corner to pickup a kindle fire or any other crap android generic device.

Apple has always focused on specifications, it's just different from the way other vendors use specifications. Apple cares about specifications as they relate to the user experience, while most other vendors seem to only care about specifications as they relate to the user's expectations. That's why they touted all the spec changes in the 4S camera, why they don't talk about the increase memory lane in the A5 processor, and why their competitors tend to focus on only upgrading specs that the user can wrap their head around and fit nicely on a spec sheet.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #39 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlandd View Post

The main reason Archos tablets will never succeed on any scale larger than their current one (smaller than miniscule) is that now they are selling to a market that is used to the customer service experience provided by Amazon, B & N and Apple, and that's not a reference to the "we'll fix it if it breaks" customer service. Most older Archos products are now doorstops because they sold them like radios or mp3 players at best, and Archos' support presence was like that of a hard drive manufacturer. That is, you would think they were hiding from you. Most people aren't crazy about how tied in one is to the "ecosystems" of any big 3 tablets, but that's how they provide a functioning experience. Pick your poison and enjoy it. "Simpler/easier to use" due to the closed aspect bothers many with good reason, but that's how it is. The days of good tablets NOT controlled by such a closed system is over, if it ever existed at all. Does anyone know someone who jumped on one of those early Archos releases who is considering a new one over these other options?

No company that thinks they only need to compete on the widget level has any chance in the $200 and up tablet category regardless of the specs of the widget. There's a big graveyard of tablets whose maker thought that.

exactly.
post #40 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlandd View Post

Yes, and also for one-handed use on a subway or bus during a commute. The 10" tablets only get pulled out pretty much when they get a seat, the smaller e-readers less so. I strap-hang with my iPod touch and wouldn't commute with a substitute that I couldn't navigate with the same hand that was holding it. Quite a specific niche I know, but... : )

we don't dare pull iPads out on public transit here (SF) - too many people getting mugged in broad daylight for Apple iDevices.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPad
  • Barnes & Noble to take on Kindle Fire, iPad with new $250 Nook Tablet
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Barnes & Noble to take on Kindle Fire, iPad with new $250 Nook Tablet