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Adobe Flash fallout extends to TVs, RIM perseveres with PlayBook

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
Adobe revealed Wednesday that its cancellation of Flash development on mobile devices will also extend to TV-related "digital home devices," while Research in Motion promised to continue in-house development of Flash for its PlayBook tablet.

The San Jose, Calif., software maker confirmed on Wednesday that it was ceasing development of its Flash Player for mobile browsers to instead focus on HTML5 and its Adobe AIR application platform. A spokesperson for Adobe indicated to GigaOm that the company will also no longer develop Flash Player for consumer electronics devices.

Adobe will continue to support existing licensees who are planning on supporting Flash Player for web browsing on digital home devices and are using the Flash Player Porting Kit to do so," the spokesperson said.

"However we believe the right approach to deliver content on televisions is through applications, not a web browsing experience, and we will continue to encourage the device and content publishing community down that path.

The news is a shift for Adobe, as the company had backed the Open Screen Project initiative to utilize Flash Player as part of a "consistent runtime environment" across desktops, mobile phones, televisions and other consumer electronics. TV makers, such as Samsung, had been slowly adding support for Flash to their connected TVs.

Google TV was also a primary partner in the effort to bring Flash Player into the living room. The Android maker is already working to improve its Google TV platform and reduce its reliance on Adobe Flash. Late last month, the company issued a major software update that brings more Android Market applications to Google TV in order to focus on native app-driven content.



PlayBook plays on

Research in Motion told AllThingsD in a statement that it would continue development of Adobe Flash Player for the BlackBerry PlayBook tablet in spite of Adobe's move away from it.

"As an Adobe source code licensee, we will continue to work on and release our own implementations. RIM remains committed to delivering an uncompromised Web browsing experience to our customers, including native support for Adobe Flash Player on our BlackBerry PlayBook tablet (similar to a desktop PC browser), as well as HTML5 support on both our BlackBerry smartphone and PlayBook browsers, the company said, adding that it was "pleased" at Adobe's renewed focus on HTML5.

Adobe's abandonment of the mobile Flash Player could come as another nail in the coffin for the already struggling PlayBook. In September, RIM revealed that it had sold just 200,000 PlayBooks in the most recent quarter, less than two days' worth of Apple's iPad sales. Flash support has been touted by RIM as a significant advantage that the PlayBook had over Apple's iPad.



RIM is currently experiencing yet another service outage, though this one does not appear to be as widespread as a recent 4-day outage that sparked class action lawsuits. The BlackBerry platform also experienced another blow on Wednesday when rival Google announced plans to pull its native Gmail app from BlackBerry App World.
post #2 of 35
The RIM PlayBook is a total disaster. please, somebody pull the plug and put it out of its misery.

RIM will go on the auction block in January after the co-CEO clowns running this sad show finally get the boot.
post #3 of 35
RIM reminds me of a crew in a sinking canoe: the hole is getting bigger and more water is rushing in. The effort to continue Flash development on the PlayBook is like RIM yelling: "ROW FASTER!!!"

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #4 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

The RIM PlayBook is a total disaster. please, somebody pull the plug and put it out of its misery.

RIM will go on the auction block in January after the co-CEO clowns running this sad show finally get the boot.

Are you kidding?¡ The PlayBook is great, it just needs more Flash like that SNL skit needed more cowbell¡
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #5 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

RIM reminds me of a crew in a sinking canoe: the hole is getting bigger and more water is rushing in. The effort to continue Flash development on the PlayBook is like RIM yelling: "ROW FASTER!!!"

"RiM's polishing the brass on the Titanic. It's all going down, man."
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #6 of 35
When I heard this on Bloomberg today, I laughed for a solid 2-3 minutes. And then I couldn't keep myself from chuckling on & off for another 15 minutes. When I bought my girlfriend an iPad 2 earlier this year, I mentioned it to a few friends (some of whom are anti-Apple types) and they said, "you could have at least given her something that would run Flash."

Geniuses! Yes, I absolutely should have bought her a Play(dead)Book or an Android Cupcake, which would run Flash maybe 40% of the time without crashing or going wonky.
If two people always agree, then one of them is redundant.
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If two people always agree, then one of them is redundant.
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post #7 of 35
And as to Google and its utterly ill-conceived Google TV, it's back to the Motorola drawing boards. Really, Adobe did it a favor. someone had to tell them. how about a Google "smart cable box"? about a year from now.
post #8 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

RIM reminds me of a crew in a sinking canoe: the hole is getting bigger and more water is rushing in. The effort to continue Flash development on the PlayBook is like RIM yelling: "ROW FASTER!!!"

"Apple is like a sinking ship and my job is to get the ship pointed in the right direction."

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

"Apple is like a sinking ship and my job is to get the ship pointed in the right direction."

Ahhh yes, they are going broke aren't they.
post #10 of 35
Definition of RIM job
post #11 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

"Apple is like a sinking ship and my job is to get the ship pointed in the right direction."

Now you've done it. Please don't give RIM any more false hope.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #12 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkevwill View Post

Ahhh yes, they are going broke aren't they.

They've managed to sell more units and stay profitable while also increasing their net profit since Apple changed the game, but they are losing ground and growing much slower than the market as a whole. That's not good and spells an inevitable doom for the company if they can't turn it out around, hence the sinking ship metaphor, not sunken ship. That said, I think rudderless might be a better fit.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #13 of 35
And just like that, Adobe just killed Tivo's entire development platform.
post #14 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

And as to Google and its utterly ill-conceived Google TV, it's back to the Motorola drawing boards. Really, Adobe did it a favor. someone had to tell them. how about a Google "smart cable box"? about a year from now.

The Google TV concept and software is fine - it really doesn't need Flash since the version 2.0 release - with Android app support - a couple of weeks ago . What it does need is more content providers. And decent hardware. I don't think there's any doubt that it will be built into Motorola's STBs next year.
post #15 of 35

Last one out... Flush the Flash!

"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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post #16 of 35
Quote:
RIM remains committed to delivering an uncompromised Web browsing experience to our customers, including native support for Adobe Flash Player on our BlackBerry PlayBook tablet (similar to a desktop PC browser), as well as HTML5 support on both our BlackBerry smartphone and PlayBook browsers,]

To bad RIM wasn't committed enough to put out an updates OS that included a built in e-mail client. But thank god they are gonna continue trying to give the few people that bought their tablet a crappy Flash experience.
post #17 of 35
So entertaining. I'm glad they left the page up.
post #18 of 35
My new 2011 Charger came with its owner's manual on CD. It required AIR to view it, so I downloaded it. While viewing a STATIC page in the manual, AIR had one core of 8 running at 100%. Just to view text. So how is AIR any different than Flash? (And yes, I removed AIR and got a printed manual.)
post #19 of 35
My Tivo Premier's HD menus are written in Flash, and I had to turn them off because they were so buggy and tended to lock up. They were nice looking and had some additional features, but were totally worthless due to the bugginess of Flash.

I switched back to the old SD menus and haven't had a problem since.
post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac.World View Post

To bad RIM wasn't committed enough to put out an updates OS that included a built in e-mail client. But thank god they are gonna continue trying to give the few people that bought their tablet a crappy Flash experience.

That's my favorite part, too. What RIM fails to realize is that this is only the beginning of the end for Flash as a content delivery tool. It will continue as a platform for building cross device apps, but I have a feeling that in two years, Flash will not be on "84% of the leading wrbsites"
post #21 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wings View Post

My new 2011 Charger came with its owner's manual on CD. It required AIR to view it, so I downloaded it. While viewing a STATIC page in the manual, AIR had one core of 8 running at 100%. Just to view text. So how is AIR any different than Flash? (And yes, I removed AIR and got a printed manual.)

AIR is Flash. It's just a way of packaging the runtime with the Flash content so you can run it as a standalone application.

So AIR isn't any 'better' than Flash Player in the browser except for the fact that you can't embed it into a webpage, so it's much easier to deliberately ignore. This fact alone will hopefully also mean that all the hordes of graphic designers, artists and amateur web developers who call themselves 'programmers' because they can hack something together in Flash, will stay away from content that you'd actually want to see.

Remember that Flash itself isn't even THAT terrible if properly used. The biggest problem with Flash has always been that 90% of Flash 'developers' are incompetent and incapable of writing efficient Flash code. Really nice and efficient Flash applications do exist. With a native toolkit like Objective-C + Cocoa at least you have some barrier of entrance to develop applications, resulting in a much higher average quality of applications.
post #22 of 35

It is sad to see a company like RIM in a death spiral...

...On the brighter side, they'll soon have the company down to a manageable size -- where 1 CEO can do the job
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #23 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by dazweeja View Post

The Google TV concept and software is fine - it really doesn't need Flash since the version 2.0 release - with Android app support - a couple of weeks ago . What it does need is more content providers. And decent hardware. I don't think there's any doubt that it will be built into Motorola's STBs next year.


When your remote looks like this, I hardly think your product can be considered "fine."

post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wings View Post

My new 2011 Charger came with its owner's manual on CD. It required AIR to view it, so I downloaded it. While viewing a STATIC page in the manual, AIR had one core of 8 running at 100%. Just to view text. So how is AIR any different than Flash? (And yes, I removed AIR and got a printed manual.)


Adobe hasn't really abandoned Flash - they've just abandoned development of the mobile Flash player. They intend to keep pushing their crappy technology as a development platform.
post #25 of 35
I don't get it. Maybe someone can explain to me, so who are these 200,000 people that buy these things, and who are the handful of people that buy Android tablets without hardly any software? Are these cutting edge early adopters or people who just haven't the faintest idea what they are buying?
post #26 of 35
My local Staples still has a Playbook display, and it still has a printed notice warning customers that they will need to download the OS before they can use the Playbook.
post #27 of 35
A doomed company decides to support a doomed multimedia plugin to run on their doomed hardware platform.

What can possibly go wrong with that strategy? :-)
post #28 of 35
Good for RIM. Again they prove to be on the cutting edge of technology.
post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lom View Post

Gotta love the colored buttons labeled with the name of the color.

For colorblind users.

Not that they've given any consideration to users with other disabilities, but hey.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #30 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by uyman View Post

I don't get it. Maybe someone can explain to me, so who are these 200,000 people that buy these things, and who are the handful of people that buy Android tablets without hardly any software? Are these cutting edge early adopters or people who just haven't the faintest idea what they are buying?

Playbook buyers = Super hardcore Blackberry fans.

Android tablet buyers = Linux nerds, geeks in general (got root?), people who hate anything sporting an Apple logo.

The rest of the world uses iPads.
post #31 of 35
The 2 bozos running the company are just driving the price down so that early in 2012, they buy back ALL the shares and take RIM private.
Then they can abandon (or sell if they find a sucker) the so-called consumer division and rake-in the profits from their core business.
Remember they are still selling a lot of phones and they have no debt !!

That's the only explanation that make sense in RIM's recent behavior !!
post #32 of 35
As with nearly every other commenter who has shared their opinion on this, I am floored by RIM's decision. It signals a compete lack of vision and understanding about the future of the web.

Adobe's decision is another sign the that "post-pc era" is a real phenomenon, and that the future of online content consumption lies in "mobile" devices. By extension, online content creation will increasingly focused on those technologies that are supported by mobile browsers. This means it will be more efficient for web developers to avoid Flash altogether and create content that can be universally consumed. The "full web experience" of the near future will not include Flash. This is already happening. How did RIM miss it?
post #33 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


It is sad to see a company like RIM in a death spiral...

...On the brighter side, they'll soon have the company down to a manageable size -- where 1 CEO can do the job

The next CEO of RIM will be a trustee in bankruptcy.
post #34 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidKod View Post

The 2 bozos running the company are just driving the price down so that early in 2012, they buy back ALL the shares and take RIM private.
Then they can abandon (or sell if they find a sucker) the so-called consumer division and rake-in the profits from their core business.
Remember they are still selling a lot of phones and they have no debt !!

That's the only explanation that make sense in RIM's recent behavior !!

At least your theory makes some sense. At this stage, that is RIM's only option.
post #35 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by uyman View Post

I don't get it. Maybe someone can explain to me, so who are these 200,000 people that buy these things, and who are the handful of people that buy Android tablets without hardly any software? Are these cutting edge early adopters or people who just haven't the faintest idea what they are buying?

The only person I know who owns a Xoom said he "wanted to like Honeycomb", but he also owns an iPad and uses it more often than the Xoom, because it works better and is ultimately more useful. So, +1 for Apple. The irony is that, in January 2010, he swore up and down that the newly announced "giant iPod Touch" was doomed to FAIL. He's a typical tech type: he likes toys and he's got a bit of "spec whore" in him, (but I didn't get the impression that the Xoom was about specs or benchmarks for him), it was more about the ideological differences he has with Apple.

He gets extremely worked up about it, and he spouts things like, "I don't want Steve Jobs telling me what I can put on my tablet, blah blah," and he points to some case where some app was rejected from the App Store for what he claims are spurious reasons, ignoring the fact that a curated store strengthens the entire iOS ecosystem more than it's ocassional rejection of an app for spurious reasons weakens it. His claim at the time was that talented ISVs would abandon iOS because of App Store rejections, and that all that would be left would be a million get-rich-quick fart apps written by high schoolers or some hyperbolic claim.

But today he carries his iPad nearly everywhere and while I don't think he's spouting the same "down with central authority let's liberate the App Store from oppressors and bring forth the age of app anarchy" statements (especially after he found some really nice iPad apps), he still holds his ideological grudge against Apple Inc. But it's hard to hold ideological grudges against the iPad when it's clearly a better product and better user experience. FWIW.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
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