or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple's charitable matching program raises $2.6M for nonprofits
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple's charitable matching program raises $2.6M for nonprofits

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
The combined efforts of both Apple and its employees have resulted in more than $2.6 million being donated to nonprofit organizations since a corporate matching program began in mid-September.

AppleInsider has learned that Apple has announced to its employees that the company has matched more than $1.3 million in donations in its program so far. Combined with the $1.3 million in personal contributions initially donated by employees, it brings the total sum of the "Apple Matching Gifts Program" to more than $2.6 million in less than two months.

The $1.3 million matched so far is being used by Apple to internally promote the program and solicit more donations. An image touting the success of the program links employees to a page that provides an overview of the matching program.

The charitable matching program was announced by Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook in an e-mail to employees in September. The program, through which money donated to a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization is matched dollar-for-dollar by Apple, kicked off on Sept. 15.

Should employees choose to take advantage of the program, they can donate up to $10,000 to a nonprofit of their choice every year, and that money will be matched by Apple. The program is currently available to full-time employees of Apple in America, but will expand to more countries in time.



"We are all really inspired by the generosity of our co-workers who give back to the community and this program is going to help that individual giving go even farther," Cook wrote to employees in September. He continued: "Thank you all for working so hard to make a difference, both here and in the lives of others. I am incredibly proud to be part of this team."

Separately, a person familiar with Apple's corporate operations also revealed that the company is hoping to boost recruiting for its Silicon Engineering Group by offering a $5,000 bonus for employee referrals. A current Apple employee who refers someone for a job by Nov. 12 can receive the bonus if the person they recommend is eventually hired.
post #2 of 31
The title of the article is a bit misleading since the Apple matching program only raised $1.3 million. The other $1.3 million was donated without any involvement of Apple.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #3 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

The title of the article is a bit misleading since the Apple matching program only raised $1.3 million. The other $1.3 million was donated without any involvement of Apple.

Not at all. The PROGRAM raised $2.6 M - $1.3 M from Apple and $1.3 M from the employees.

Granted, some of the employee contribution would probably have occurred without Apple's program, but it doesn't change the fact that $2.6 M was contributed through this program.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #4 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Not at all. The PROGRAM raised $2.6 M - $1.3 M from Apple and $1.3 M from the employees.

Granted, some of the employee contribution would probably have occurred without Apple's program, but it doesn't change the fact that $2.6 M was contributed through this program.

I disagree, but you can believe what you want.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #5 of 31
Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.

And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.
post #6 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I disagree, but you can believe what you want.

Nothing misleading about the article at all. Nothing suggests that Apple coughed up the full $2.6M. And obviously some of the employees' $1.3M would have happened anyway. So what? The article is just an update on the program and gives us a sense of how significant it is. I'd characterize it as modestly to moderately successful given the size of Apple, but it's only been in place for a few weeks so that's impressive.
post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.

And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.

You're kidding I hope. Right?

Everything that Jobs did was "part of the culture" at Apple and therefore any changes are the beginning of the end? That's your thesis?

There's no chance that employees will feel proud to work at a company that is supportive of their charitable giving and therefore will be more loyal and productive? No chance at all, because Jobs didn't believe it?
post #8 of 31
Quote:
The $1.3 million matched so far is being used by Apple to internally promote the program and solicit more donations. An image touting the success of the program links employees to a page that provides an overview of the matching program.

So, are they using the money to promote the program, or have they actually matched the donations to non-profits? The way this is written it sounds like they are keeping the match money, and just spending it on promotional material.
post #9 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.

And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.

In case you didn't read SJ's biography or been up to date on the blogosphere lately, SJ specifically asked the staff at Apple to NOT ask what Steve would. He wanted them to follow their own voice while remaining true to the goal of creating the best products in the world. That's exactly what they're doing.

So what's your problem.
post #10 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I disagree, but you can believe what you want.

You're in the wrong here. The amount is clearly referring to the program Apple started, not Apple's specific donation to the program. If the title said "Apple's raised $2.6M for its charitable matching program" then I would agree with you. The location of the preposition 'for' changes the context.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #11 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by CIA View Post

So, are they using the money to promote the program, or have they actually matched the donations to non-profits? The way this is written it sounds like they are keeping the match money, and just spending it on promotional material.

I assume it's just a mix-up in how that's being reported. It's pretty clear that Apple promised to match dollar-for-dollars donations to specific not-for-profits.
post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

Nothing misleading about the article at all. Nothing suggests that Apple coughed up the full $2.6M.

Which is exactly my point. The title is a spin job.

For the title to be correct Apple would have to design a charitable program where by employees would have the contributions deducted from their pay check and they would select from a list of charitable organizations. Then Apple would match it and send the funds to the organization. That would be a program that could claim that it raised 2.6 million. But that is not how the actual program works.

If you look at the Apple page they don't mention 2.6 million, they say they matched 1.3 million which is what the title of this article should read in my opinion.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.

And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.

Dumb post of the week.
post #14 of 31
deleted
post #15 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

If you look at the Apple page they don't mention 2.6 million, they say they matched 1.3 million which is what the title of this article should read in my opinion.

I disagree. An employer matching the donations provides a strong incentive for the employees to contribute in the first place, and had Apple not matched these donations, then it is reasonable to assume that 1.3 million would never have been contributed by the employees. It is because of Apple's donation matching that the total figure turned out to be 2.6 million.
post #16 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

If you look at the Apple page they don't mention 2.6 million, they say they matched 1.3 million which is what the title of this article should read in my opinion.

They matched. They.. as in Apple matched. That's correct, but so is the title that stated that the program raised x amount. The program was created by Apple but is not Apple. There is a very clear and distinct line that leads to no ambiguity as written, although I do agree that it could be made more clear as not everyone reads internet webpages as intently as they might a textbook.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #17 of 31
Apparently no story is immune to negative feedback, not even an article about Apple giving money to charities.

Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

Reply

Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

Reply
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

They matched. They.. as in Apple matched. That's correct, but so is the title that stated that the program raised x amount. The program was created by Apple but is not Apple. There is a very clear and distinct line that leads to no ambiguity as written, although I do agree that it could be made more clear as not everyone reads internet webpages as intently as they might a textbook.

Maybe it should read Apple's matching program helps raise 2.6 million...

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Maybe it should read Apple's matching program helps raise 2.6 million...

I agree 'helps' is a good modifier to further move away form ambiguity, but I think your original issue would still exist even if somewhat diminished.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.

And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.

Apple had an employee charitable matching program up into the 1990s, was discontinued as a cost saving measure. I don't know if it started on Steve's watch or after.
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.

And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.

WOW that's total bull-crap!

I doubt SJ was against charitable donations with other people's money. He might not have been into giving away his money, but I don't believe that extended to the culture and generosity of Apple employees.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

It's true that Steve cut Apple's philanthropy back during the early days of his return, in the period he referred to as Apple's "near-death experience".

But IIRC the philanthropy division was resurrected a couple years ago, while Steve was very much alive and in charge.

Got any proof for that?
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Apparently no story is immune to negative feedback, not even an article about Apple giving money to charities.

Honestly...a company with over 80B cash on hand handing out peanuts isn't even newsworthy IMO.

Better than 0...but more a publicity stunt than anything...like MOST charitable efforts.
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

Honestly...a company with over 80B cash on hand handing out peanuts isn't even newsworthy IMO.

Better than 0...but more a publicity stunt than anything...like MOST charitable efforts.


True except they only gave out like 0.00001625% of their cash.

But too bad they required their employees to do it first. The mark of a selfish & stingy company.

No matter what type of media...movies, music, books, photos and web pages

look better and sound better on the Kindle Fire HD and HDX than any iPad

Reply

No matter what type of media...movies, music, books, photos and web pages

look better and sound better on the Kindle Fire HD and HDX than any iPad

Reply
post #25 of 31
It isn't misleading. It says Apple's Charitable Matching Program raised 2.6 million. Apple created the program, which offered to match any employee contributions to charity. A matching program consists of both Apple and its employees' contributions. Do you honestly think by Apple offering the program it 1) didn't implicitly encourage its employees to donate, and 2) offer an incentive for them to do so? That is the whole point of a matching program. I think the title is not misleading at all.



Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

The title of the article is a bit misleading since the Apple matching program only raised $1.3 million. The other $1.3 million was donated without any involvement of Apple.
post #26 of 31
Apple didn't publicize its matching program so I doubt it was a publicity stunt. An internal company wide email outlining the program was leaked, and news sources reported it.

I suspect Apple, like most things, keeps a large amount of its charitable activity quiet. However, Apple donated millions to the planned new Stanford Hospital, it donated thousands of iPads to Teach America; it donated iPads to Oregon to assist disabled voters; it donated a hundred thousand dollars to defeat Proposition 8 in California; after the Japan disaster it made iTunes an easy way to donate money to the Red Cross and ate the transaction costs; it donated a million dollars after 9-11 and equipment to rescue workers; and it donated $250, 000 to fund a Children's museum.

All that is peanuts, but we really don't know the extent of Apple's charitable activities, and I am sure the parties involved are happy to have Apple's help.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

Honestly...a company with over 80B cash on hand handing out peanuts isn't even newsworthy IMO.

Better than 0...but more a publicity stunt than anything...like MOST charitable efforts.
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Russell View Post

True except they only gave out like 0.00001625% of their cash.

But too bad they required their employees to do it first. The mark of a selfish & stingy company.

Go look up the difference between a for-profit and not-for-profit company.

If you personally don't want to invest in or purchase products from a company that is "selfish and stingy" according to your criteria, then knock yourself out.
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Apple didn't publicize its matching program so I doubt it was a publicity stunt. An internal company wide email outlining the program was leaked, and news sources reported it.

I suspect Apple, like most things, keeps a large amount of its charitable activity quiet. However, Apple donated millions to the planned new Stanford Hospital, it donated thousands of iPads to Teach America; it donated iPads to Oregon to assist disabled voters; it donated a hundred thousand dollars to defeat Proposition 8 in California; after the Japan disaster it made iTunes an easy way to donate money to the Red Cross and ate the transaction costs; it donated a million dollars after 9-11 and equipment to rescue workers; and it donated $250, 000 to fund a Children's museum.

All that is peanuts, but we really don't know the extent of Apple's charitable activities, and I am sure the parties involved are happy to have Apple's help.

I'm not discounting their charitable efforts (and unlike the guy who first replied to me I don't consider Apple anymore evil or greedy than most American companies...hell they are probably significantly less "Evil")

I just know that if we all really wanted to make a true change in the world we all could...especially these multi-billion dollar companies we all fight in support of...the top 10 could single-handedly end world hunger. Without giving a single handout other than food and water.

But then you get into the politics of the regions, etc, and why a lot of charitable organizations fail because the corrupt regimes overcharge them for simple shit.

The more you look at the entire world the more you realize how fucked up we all really are. Look at almost any person from all angles and it because almost too easy to see that we are all essentially worthless.
post #29 of 31
deleted
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Of course not. Remember, I'm just a paid troll (although in this case, obviously the check is coming from Apple).

damn I gotta get on that bandwagon...Google pays handsomely as does Microsoft but I need more for my many many babymommas.
post #31 of 31
Applied Materials - As a responsible corporate citizen, Applied works to improve the way people live -- from the health and well-being of our employees and their communities to our sustainable business practices and corporate governance - every aspect of our business supports the goal of building a brighter future for all.
Community Investments
Applied Materials and the Applied Materials Foundation focus charitable giving in the areas of education, civic development, the environment, and arts & culture.

Oracle - We continue to support K-12 and higher education institutions with technology education programs that reach 1.5 million students each year. Working to reduce our environmental footprint, we manage our facilities and business operations with an eye toward sustainability. We also donate millions of dollars to nonprofit organizations that share our goal of enriching community life globally.

Safeway - Safeway and Easter Seals work together to offer help, hope and answers to children and adults living with autism and other disabilities or special needs. Since 1985, Safeway has raised more than $110 million for Easter Seals programs such as vocational training, independent living assistance and early intervention therapy for children with developmental delays.

Safeway also works hand in hand with the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA), which is dedicated to curing muscular dystrophy, ALS (Lou Gehrigs disease) and related neuromuscular diseases. This year Safeway raised $10.4 million, bringing the total raised over the years to more than $68.4 million for muscular dystrophy charities.

Target Corp. - Since 1946, Target has given 5% of it's income to communities. A significant portion of this giving goes toward funding reading and educationthe heart of a bright future for us all.
And now, were on track to reach a total of $1 billion in giving to educationwith a focus on readingby the end of 2015. Projects we fund are done in partnership with smart, passionate organizations to ensure that kids in your community get the opportunity to shine.

Apple - "The $1.3 million matched so far is being used by Apple to internally promote the program and solicit more donations."


All Apple can come up with is $1.3m, which won't go to any charities. They are keeping it to cover their own costs, pay themselves if you will. That is not a donation by any definition.

No matter what type of media...movies, music, books, photos and web pages

look better and sound better on the Kindle Fire HD and HDX than any iPad

Reply

No matter what type of media...movies, music, books, photos and web pages

look better and sound better on the Kindle Fire HD and HDX than any iPad

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple's charitable matching program raises $2.6M for nonprofits