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Review roundup: Amazon Kindle Fire a bargain, but no threat to Apple's iPad - Page 2

post #41 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by slapppy View Post

Sadly, too many experts and bloggers online are reviewing the Kindle and giving the impression that its not like an iPad, "It's better than the iPad". Pretty much labeling it as the real Killer iPad.

who said this? where are the citations?
post #42 of 127
People have short memories. You forget that iOS devices have had issues. Apple has come a long way with iOS 5 (and even then, after the upgrade, my iPhone often drops me to the home screen while using Safari or the App Store).

There's no way the brand-new Kindle Fire is going to be as polished as the iPad 2 out of the gate. Heck, it may never be as polished. Nonetheless, Amazon is going to continue to refine, fix bugs, etc., you know... the same thing Apple has been doing for years.

If the Amazon Fire can surf the internet, then the millions of people who buy one are likely going to be satisfied. Would they like an iPad even more? Perhaps. But since they purchased a Kindle Fire instead, and considering most won't own an iPad 2, they won't know the difference.

I mean... if I ever owned a Jaguar, I'd probably never want to drive anything less. But since I've never owned or driven a Jaguar, I don't know or care what I'm missing.
post #43 of 127
The Kindle Fire: The Christmas present that gets used once and forgotten in the desk drawer until the next time you open it and say "I forgot I had that".
post #44 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullhead View Post

Lots of people will be duped into thinking they are getting an iPad for $200

the Kindle Fire exists in a different market than the iPad. there's no need for you to be so threatened by Amazon's offering.
post #45 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

I wasn't talking about you.

+1 for sarcastic explanation of the "end sarcasm" tag. I liked the irony.

You said, "until then, we're stuck paying..." in a response to a comment I made. I assumed, apparently incorrectly, that you meant me too.
post #46 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by slapppy View Post

Sadly, too many experts and bloggers online are reviewing the Kindle and giving the impression that its not like an iPad, "It's better than the iPad". Pretty much labeling it as the real Killer iPad.

Source? I have yet to see that from anyone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

15 inch laptops containing similar guts start at around $250. I'm not sure that the low-priced netbook market is strong anymore. There are now alternatives that work better at the same prices, and alternatives that work better for higher prices. Apple's netbooks start at around $1000, don't they?

What 15" laptops are selling w/ARM processors? Netbooks have had shrinking sales for awhile now. How is the MBA a netbook? Netbooks used shitty Atom processors and XP, Linux or Win 7 Starter. The MBA has Sandy Bridge i5 and i7 processors and SSD drives, plus a full modern OS w/o limitations. How is that at all similar?
post #47 of 127
Two reviews of the fire make it sound more like a puff of smoke to me. They described it as clunky, uninspiring, extremely slow, and unpolished. For $200 the price seems high. Nothing ran smooth, no interface to let you know when it was trying to do something like a spinning gear or bar. You just had to wonder if it was stuck or really getting onto what you wanted to do next.
post #48 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

I was not addressing the utility of the machine. I was addressing usage patterns.

"it does 90% of what most people use the iPad for".

Correcting people's reading comprehension problems is getting boring.

Not sure how accurate your "90%) is but "usage" is kind of a slippery term when it comes to tablets. One of the things that people use a tablet for is the user experience. In fact, I would guess that 25% of the overall use of the tablet is the experience, not the utility. And so, on that front, this "tablet" would appear to be a bit of a let down. This is, again, just a wireless, hand-held AMazon Prime shopping kiosk. Further, it is probably more useful for children with their smaller hands and will likely be a big gift item for them this holiday season. It's kind of like the "Mattel and Mars Bar Quick Energy Chocobot Hour" disguised as a mini-iPad.
post #49 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by skolvikings View Post

People have short memories. You forget that iOS devices have had issues. Apple has come a long way with iOS 5 (and even then, after the upgrade, my iPhone often drops me to the home screen while using Safari or the App Store).

There's no way the brand-new Kindle Fire is going to be as polished as the iPad 2 out of the gate. Heck, it may never be as polished. Nonetheless, Amazon is going to continue to refine, fix bugs, etc., you know... the same thing Apple has been doing for years.

If the Amazon Fire can surf the internet, then the millions of people who buy one are likely going to be satisfied. Would they like an iPad even more? Perhaps. But since they purchased a Kindle Fire instead, and considering most won't own an iPad 2, they won't know the difference.

I mean... if I ever owned a Jaguar, I'd probably never want to drive anything less. But since I've never owned or driven a Jaguar, I don't know or care what I'm missing.

But that only works if a lot of people that you know don't have a Jaguar as well! I think that is why in the age of laptops, Apple has done so much better. Before, when everyone primarily had desktops you rarely saw directly what other people had and could dismiss their choice as irrelevant. However, with laptops and the Apple Stores people see the "competitor" much more often. I think the same thing will be true with tablets, and to a great extent is why a lot of the Android tablets have failed. People could directly see (through stores and friends) that the newer entrants were clearly not as good as the one that reinvented tablets.
post #50 of 127
I find it humorous (but expected) that an Apple site would carefully choose to quote from the negative reviews, despite the fact that most reviews agree that despite its shortcomings and the fact that it can only do 80% of what the iPad can do for 40% of the price, it is a great value.

I really want to get my hands on one - I may actually buy one if it is halfway decent.

Typing this from an iPad2 provided by my work (which I love, by the way).
post #51 of 127
It has an audience. There's a huge chunk of people out there that would just surf the web and read books on an iPad. This device is for them. The billion dollar question is how big that segment is. For Amazon this is an essential move. Apple is pushing iBooks on iOS. Google is pushing Google Books on Android. The only way to keep their customers loyal to their content sales stream is to offer them a cheap platform locked down to their content store. It's no iPad killer. But I'll bet that it will do better than most here suggest it would.
post #52 of 127
To me the low spec part is the low 1024x600 screen resolution.

1024x768 would have been more adequate.
post #53 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

...The only way to keep their customers loyal to their content sales stream is to offer them a cheap platform locked down to their content store.

Except that we can read Kindle books on virtually anything. I wonder if the same holds true for their magazines or are they exclusive to the Fire?
post #54 of 127
Fire for $200?
I just bought an iPad1 (16 GB) on eBay essentially new for $340 including S/H.
In the original box, and the iPad and the box in mint condition, not a scratch on them!
post #55 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

I was not addressing the utility of the machine. I was addressing usage patterns.

"it does 90% of what most people use the iPad for".

Correcting people's reading comprehension problems is getting boring.

Why isn't it obvious to anyone that you are a very subtle troll. Just look at the post count

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post #56 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Yes, nothing like access to past seasons of TV Shows to really get me excited to drop my Dish account and miss all the shows I currently DVR, Not.

The vast majority of the content is also non-HD.

I cancelled my cable/sat service coz the vast majority of content is repeats of old tv shows.

I'm not willing to pay £60/mth for 500 channels of total crap plus the odd good channel, sports and movies. I can watch the same sports channels in the pub for nothing.

Non-HD content is not a problem for me. With unlimited streaming for £10 a month I don't care if it is DVD quality.
post #57 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Touch1 View Post

Fire for $200?
I just bought an iPad1 (16 GB) on eBay essentially new for $340 including S/H.
In the original box, and the iPad and the box in mint condition, not a scratch on them!

Yes but you specifically bought an iPad to have an iPad. This isn't an iClone. This is a Kindle, these things practically sell themselves by name alone. People aren't looking at this saying "oh this is cheaper than the iPad." People can do a little more than the orignal Kindles can do. It's no threat to Apple as they have even stated. I can't recount how many people on the train and bus use eReaders over iPads. It's no biggie. Hell I love my iPad but this is for a whole other area of consumers.
post #58 of 127
Let's see...

From The Verge review:

Quote:
Still, there's no question that the Fire is a really terrific tablet for its price. The amount of content you have access to and the ease of getting to that content is notable to say the least. The device is decently designed, and the software while lacking some polish is still excellent compared to pretty much anything in this range (and that includes the Nook Color). It's a well thought out tablet that can only get better as the company refines the software. It's not perfect, but it's a great start, and at $200, that may be all Amazon needs this holiday shopping season.

From Mashable.com's review:

Quote:
Most of these gripes are minor, and to fully appreciate the Amazon Kindle Fire, you have to step back and look at all youre getting for $199 (the base 16GB iPad is $499, the Nook Tablet $249). This is a highly polished device and collection of services. It bakes in books, music, movies, apps/games, magazines, multi-tasking, universal search, easy access to anything you have in Amazons cloud, and a sense that this device and Amazon know you. It is the closest tablet Ive seen yet to an Apple iPad: a consistent, well-thought out marriage of hardware and services that offer an almost frictionless environment for app purchase and content consumption. This is why the iPad has been so successful and why I think the Kindle Fire, despite its imperfections, is a winner, too.

From the PCMag.com review:

Quote:
The Amazon Kindle Fire puts the Apple iPad on notice. The Fire is the first small tablet that average users can pick up and immediately use, with a simple, clear interface. Then there's the price: Android along with amazing specs for just $199. It's open enough to attract geeks, too. While the user interface occasionally gets sluggish, we're willing to have a bit of patience to get a first-rate tablet for half of what most competitors charge, thus the Kindle Fire is our first Editors' Choice for small tablets.

From the MSNBC.com review:

Quote:
This won't be one of those long technical reviews. You're reading this to make sure that the Amazon Kindle Fire you already know you want is up to snuff, and well, it is. I've had it since Thursday reading, watching video, listening to music, checking email, even playing some games and I can say it's tight. Turn it on and you know what to do, like with an Apple product. So much like an Apple product that Apple should be scared.
post #59 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by skolvikings View Post

People have short memories. You forget that iOS devices have had issues. Apple has come a long way with iOS 5 (and even then, after the upgrade, my iPhone often drops me to the home screen while using Safari or the App Store).

There's no way the brand-new Kindle Fire is going to be as polished as the iPad 2 out of the gate. Heck, it may never be as polished. Nonetheless, Amazon is going to continue to refine, fix bugs, etc., you know... the same thing Apple has been doing for years.

If the Amazon Fire can surf the internet, then the millions of people who buy one are likely going to be satisfied. Would they like an iPad even more? Perhaps. But since they purchased a Kindle Fire instead, and considering most won't own an iPad 2, they won't know the difference.

I mean... if I ever owned a Jaguar, I'd probably never want to drive anything less. But since I've never owned or driven a Jaguar, I don't know or care what I'm missing.

This is a tablet not a phone. Plus it's 2011. iOS had its own issues but it was the best game in town when it came out. Fire is not.
post #60 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

This is what I said:

"It doesn't work as well as a device costing (up to) more than 4 times its cost."

The "why would anybody say such a thing" question is left as an exercise to the reader.

You're the only one doing contortions.
post #61 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sector7G View Post

Can't you see this is not a tablet. It's not a iPad competitor. Amazon is charging its customers 200 dollars to buy there content. What a slap in the face this will be to there customers when there iPad killers tiny screen lags while changing pages

First it isn't Amazon's content. It is their marketplace. Second you are paying $500 to use Apple's marketplace when you buy a low end iPad 2, so what exactly is your point?

I am an Amazon user. They have great deals on a lot of tangible items and with Prime membership it is a deal no one else in the marketplace can match. There will be plenty of satisfied Amazon users more than willing to spend $200 on this device with all that Amazon offers.

Get your head out of the Apple tunnel and open your eyes a bit.
post #62 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by theoneaboveall View Post

Yes but you specifically bought an iPad to have an iPad. This isn't an iClone. This is a Kindle, these things practically sell themselves by name alone. People aren't looking at this saying "oh this is cheaper than the iPad." People can do a little more than the orignal Kindles can do. It's no threat to Apple as they have even stated. I can't recount how many people on the train and bus use eReaders over iPads. It's no biggie. Hell I love my iPad but this is for a whole other area of consumers.

I disagree. This is a tablet competitor just like iPhone was for blackberry even though Apple said it wasn't targeting the BB market. It's the same scenario but the Amazon Kindle isn't as good as the iPad. Where as the iPhone was the best game in town when it arrived.
post #63 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by troyp View Post

It would seem that an App that allows you to stream or download your content to your iOS or Android device would have made more sense for Amazon. Why build a tablet and sell it at a loss when they could have just built an app?

You are probably right but Apple's terms probably scared them. Amazon doesn't want to be reliant on Apple for business so it released it's own hardware.
post #64 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by applebjesus View Post

First it isn't Amazon's content. It is their marketplace. Second you are paying $500 to use Apple's marketplace when you buy a low end iPad 2, so what exactly is your point?

I am an Amazon user. They have great deals on a lot of tangible items and with Prime membership it is a deal no one else in the marketplace can match. There will be plenty of satisfied Amazon users more than willing to spend $200 on this device with all that Amazon offers.

Get your head out of the Apple tunnel and open your eyes a bit.

Actually you don't have to use Apple's marketplace. You can go on safari and download what you want directly to your iDevice.
post #65 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSquirrel View Post

Source? I have yet to see that from anyone.



What 15" laptops are selling w/ARM processors? Netbooks have had shrinking sales for awhile now. How is the MBA a netbook? Netbooks used shitty Atom processors and XP, Linux or Win 7 Starter. The MBA has Sandy Bridge i5 and i7 processors and SSD drives, plus a full modern OS w/o limitations. How is that at all similar?

It's similar to people who don't know what they are buying or in this instance comparing.
post #66 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

From The Verge review:

Still, there's no question that the Fire is a really terrific tablet for its price. The amount of content you have access to — and the ease of getting to that content — is notable to say the least. The device is decently designed, and the software — while lacking some polish — is still excellent compared to pretty much anything in this range (and that includes the Nook Color). It's a well thought out tablet that can only get better as the company refines the software. It's not perfect, but it's a great start, and at $200, that may be all Amazon needs this holiday shopping season.

You left this part out of the Verge review: "If you're thinking about getting the Fire, you have to decide not just whether you want a tablet, but what kind of tablet you want. This isn't an iPad-killer. It has the potential to do lots of things, but there are many things I have yet to see it do, and I wonder if it will get there given the lean software support."

Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

From Mashable.com's review:

Most of these gripes are minor, and to fully appreciate the Amazon Kindle Fire, you have to step back and look at all you’re getting for $199 (the base 16GB iPad is $499, the Nook Tablet $249). This is a highly polished device and collection of services. It bakes in books, music, movies, apps/games, magazines, multi-tasking, universal search, easy access to anything you have in Amazon’s cloud, and a sense that this device and Amazon know you. It is the closest tablet I’ve seen yet to an Apple iPad: a consistent, well-thought out marriage of hardware and services that offer an almost frictionless environment for app purchase and content consumption. This is why the iPad has been so successful and why I think the Kindle Fire, despite its imperfections, is a winner, too.

You left out this part from the Mashable review: "This is a product I wanted to love...Instead, now I’m discovering it’s a somewhat flawed gadget — a product that literally does not always know which way is up."

And Mashable calling it "highly polished" is a direct contradiction to what Engadget said (not that either is the end-all be-all authority).

So yeah, we can take snippets from various reviews and make it look like they love it or look like it's no big deal.
post #67 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

The only flaw with that theory is that buyer's of the Amazon Fire who are too cheap to buy an iPad will have never used an iPad extensively and thusly won't realize that the Fire's experience is comparatively poor. Just as people bought up Windows PCs in the 90's in droves, despite being a poor imitation of the Mac, people may buy out of sheer ignorance or favoring cheap over quality.

I disagree with this. I don't think you can make strong parallels between the burgeoning tablet market and the history of PC trends.

PC uptake and lockin were driven by business adoption, not consumer cheapness. Once business standardized on cheap PCs the Mac never had a chance, market share wise, since many people's first exposure to these machines was at work and consumer buying followed from that familiarity.

The iPad has it the other way around-- business is following consumer demand. That means a completely different dynamic is in play, with the iPad benefiting from both broad consumer exposure and enterprise lock-in. While cheaper products are and will be available, consumer choice is more likely to follow the general consumer electronics trend of perceived quality commanding higher prices with a great slew of cheaper products satisfying bargain hunters-- something like the current situation in LCD TVs. Many people go to Best Buy aware that Samsung or Panasonic are the "good" choices, if you can spend a little more, and Vizio, Westinghouse or some house brand are the cheap "settle for" brands if you can't.

That's very different from a defacto standard like the PC market, wherein network effects made the PC the apparent only choice for many consumers. In fact (as we see now), the "post PC" world with its loosening of those very effects allows for accelerating sales of the Mac itself, as consumers prove willing to spend more on the MacBook Air to get what they want. People will spend more to get what they want, provided they trust the value is really there and the extra amount isn't completely daunting, as long as there aren't compelling factors (such as near monopoly network effects) limiting their perception of choice. You could argue that the iPad is actually the device enjoying that perception of near monopoly, at least for now.

Quote:
This is very true and I truly hope Apple isn't too full of themselves to not use this approach. If they trim the storage of the iPad 2 to 8GB I believe they could sell it for $299 when the iPad 3 hits for $499.

I wouldn't be surprised to see the same strategy Apple is using with the iPhone, wherein last year's iPad becomes the cheaper model.
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post #68 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post

You left out this part from the Mashable review: "This is a product I wanted to love...Instead, now Im discovering its a somewhat flawed gadget a product that literally does not always know which way is up."


and you left out the most important paragraph

"Most of these gripes are minor, and to fully appreciate the Amazon Kindle Fire, you have to step back and look at all youre getting for $199 (the base 16GB iPad is $499, the Nook Tablet $249). This is a highly polished device and collection of services. It bakes in books, music, movies, apps/games, magazines, multi-tasking, universal search, easy access to anything you have in Amazons cloud, and a sense that this device and Amazon know you. It is the closest tablet Ive seen yet to an Apple iPad: a consistent, well-thought out marriage of hardware and services that offer an almost frictionless environment for app purchase and content consumption. This is why the iPad has been so successful and why I think the Kindle Fire, despite its imperfections, is a winner, too."

summary: the Kindle Fire is a great product.
post #69 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post

and you left out the most important paragraph

"Most of these gripes are minor, and to fully appreciate the Amazon Kindle Fire, you have to step back and look at all youre getting for $199 (the base 16GB iPad is $499, the Nook Tablet $249). This is a highly polished device and collection of services. It bakes in books, music, movies, apps/games, magazines, multi-tasking, universal search, easy access to anything you have in Amazons cloud, and a sense that this device and Amazon know you. It is the closest tablet Ive seen yet to an Apple iPad: a consistent, well-thought out marriage of hardware and services that offer an almost frictionless environment for app purchase and content consumption. This is why the iPad has been so successful and why I think the Kindle Fire, despite its imperfections, is a winner, too."

[s]summary: the Kindle Fire is a great product.[/s]

Summary: It's a good product for $199. Price matters because the price is the selling point. Apple is selling the whole experience.
post #70 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post

and you left out the most important paragraph

"Most of these gripes are minor, and to fully appreciate the Amazon Kindle Fire, you have to step back and look at all you’re getting for $199 (the base 16GB iPad is $499, the Nook Tablet $249). This is a highly polished device and collection of services. It bakes in books, music, movies, apps/games, magazines, multi-tasking, universal search, easy access to anything you have in Amazon’s cloud, and a sense that this device and Amazon know you. It is the closest tablet I’ve seen yet to an Apple iPad: a consistent, well-thought out marriage of hardware and services that offer an almost frictionless environment for app purchase and content consumption. This is why the iPad has been so successful and why I think the Kindle Fire, despite its imperfections, is a winner, too."

summary: the Kindle Fire is a great product.

I've talked about this before, but this kind of review suffers from the group think that has been insisting that the iPad was only for "consumption" all along, first as a way to dismiss it as a legitimate heir to traditional computing, and lately as a way to grade the competition on a curve.

"Consumption", the thinking seems to go, is all a tablet can ever be good for, so if any rival to the iPad can get that more or less right it's more or less as good.

This, of course, ignores Apple's actual ambitions for the iPad, which is to provide a true post PC device. Apple is clearly not satisfied for the iPad to be merely a consumption device, and I think as time goes on you're going to see some cognitive dissonance as the consumption ghetto becomes a kind of self-fulfilling trap for the competition. Reviews like this will be left celebrating "frictionless consumption" with a "what more could you possibly want" attitude while Apple ably demonstrates exactly what more is possible.
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post #71 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdonisSMU View Post

Summary: It's a great product for $199.

absolutely. as such, insecure folks don't need to repeatedly justify their Apple purchases and simply accept that many, many people will enjoy the Kindle Fire.
post #72 of 127
Interesting reviews. Sounds like it will be popular for kids but adults may be disappointed with the performance, even with low expectations. And I'm still not convinced that this is a better choice than an iPad touch, is there any other advantage besides screen size?

And what's the return policy for the Fire, is there a restocking fee if you send it back?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

The Kindle Fire (once the bugs are shaken out), is potentially a great product for a certain group of people...

I'd say IF the bugs are shaken out. People should have lower expectations based on the price. But if this can't do simple stuff like page turns and zooming magazines smoothly, something is wrong. Especially if it's dual core processor at the same speed as iPad 2, and same ram. Missing features are known but performance really has no reason to be laggy. Same goes for web browsing, especially after Amazon raised expectations by hyping their supposed acceleration.

Quote:
Originally Posted by troyp View Post

It would seem that an App that allows you to stream or download your content to your iOS or Android device would have made more sense for Amazon. Why build a tablet and sell it at a loss when they could have just built an app?

Because this way lets them put their store front and center, and hide other ways of getting content onto the device.


Quote:
Originally Posted by theoneaboveall View Post

People can do a little more than the original Kindles can do.

Sure, but I'd argue for someone who mainly wants to read books, this device does it worse than the cheaper kindles.
post #73 of 127
The Kindle WILL compete with the iPad.
I dare say NONE of you guys are product marketing managers.
If you guys think Apple is ignoring any of this stuff you are mistaken.

Take a peek at the survey ZDNet posted last week below.

$499 will buy you TWO Kindle fires that do 80% of what an iPad will do.
That's what an average consumer will think about. Not UI, not pretty slick... but the $300 price difference that 20% makes up.

And who cares about 3G? A ton of iPad users still use good old Free WiFi.



---

To buy a Kindle Fire or an iPad? That is the question on the minds of many consumers this holiday season, according to new research from consumer electronics shopping site Retrevo.com.

According to the survey, more current and non-current tablet owners replied that they are planning to buy a Kindle Fire over an iPad in the next couple of months. Heres the breakdown:

20 percent of tablet owners said yes, an iPad
10 percent of people said yes, an iPad
27 percent of tablet owners said yes, the Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet
12 percent of non-tablet owners said, yes, the Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet
post #74 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

I've talked about this before, but this kind of review suffers from the group think that has been insisting that the iPad was only for "consumption" all along ...

the review is about the Amazon Kindle Fire and it's not a strike against Apple iPad.
post #75 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by skolvikings View Post

People have short memories. You forget that iOS devices have had issues. Apple has come a long way with iOS 5 (and even then, after the upgrade, my iPhone often drops me to the home screen while using Safari or the App Store).

My iPhone absolutely never does this. Antidote to your anecdote.

Quote:
There's no way the brand-new Kindle Fire is going to be as polished as the iPad 2 out of the gate. Heck, it may never be as polished. Nonetheless, Amazon is going to continue to refine, fix bugs, etc., you know... the same thing Apple has been doing for years.

Except Apple has fundamentally different aspirations for the iPad than Amazon does for the Fire. All Amazon needs is a reasonably functional window onto their store. That's what it's for. In fact, to the extent that it does anything really well it's a loss for Amazon, since a consumer using a Fire to do anything but consume Amazon goods and services is a Fire that isn't earning back its subsidized price.

Quote:
If the Amazon Fire can surf the internet, then the millions of people who buy one are likely going to be satisfied. Would they like an iPad even more? Perhaps. But since they purchased a Kindle Fire instead, and considering most won't own an iPad 2, they won't know the difference.

Sure, maybe for now. But pretty soon "tablet" is going to stop being a novelty and start being a standard computing device. At that point more people are going to be interested in what else it can do beyond surf and email and looks at videos. That's what I imagine what most people are using their laptops for most of the time, but I don't think you could sell a machine that is explicitly limited to that, even if was cheap, because we all know what computers are capable of and would prefer to at least have the possibility of that functionality at our disposal, even if we don't use it all the time.

Quote:
I mean... if I ever owned a Jaguar, I'd probably never want to drive anything less. But since I've never owned or driven a Jaguar, I don't know or care what I'm missing.

Except a few hundred dollars isn't remotely the differential between a luxury and economy car, and that few hundred dollars gets you actual functionality, not just luxury trappings and bells and whistles. That sub-Jaguar would be a lot tougher sell if it was only thousands less than the Jag, couldn't go over 40 MPH, and had no trunk. Maybe if cars were brand new and people were still digging the whole idea, but not after the market had matured a bit.
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post #76 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post

and you left out the most important paragraph

"Most of these gripes are minor, and to fully appreciate the Amazon Kindle Fire, you have to step back and look at all youre getting for $199 (the base 16GB iPad is $499, the Nook Tablet $249). This is a highly polished device and collection of services. It bakes in books, music, movies, apps/games, magazines, multi-tasking, universal search, easy access to anything you have in Amazons cloud, and a sense that this device and Amazon know you. It is the closest tablet Ive seen yet to an Apple iPad: a consistent, well-thought out marriage of hardware and services that offer an almost frictionless environment for app purchase and content consumption. This is why the iPad has been so successful and why I think the Kindle Fire, despite its imperfections, is a winner, too."

summary: the Kindle Fire is a great product.

If you go back to post #66, you'll see that I had edited it to include that original text from Caliminius' post. I didn't include it originally because Caliminius had already posted the excerpt in his/her post. I was simply trying to keep it short.
post #77 of 127
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Originally Posted by Aizmov View Post

Why isn't it obvious to anyone that you are a very subtle troll. Just look at the post count

It's obvious, it's been pointed out, and most of the oldies here just move on.

He's just shameless and relentless. We think he gets paid on a per-reply basis by the likes of Google nd Samsung.
post #78 of 127
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Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post

the review is about the Amazon Kindle Fire and it's not a strike against Apple iPad.

I'm not saying it's a strike against the iPad, I'm saying it's buying into lazy assumptions about what tablets are for and concluding some things that may not be true.

if, in fact, "all anyone wants" is easy consumption of media and services, then a device like the Fire will no doubt be very successful. However, if there is a growing perception that tablets should rightfully be PC replacements, than something like the Fire becomes a bit of a cul-de-sac, similar to certain limited computing appliances from the early days of desktop machines.

That's a fundamental distinction that doesn't have much to do with championing the iPad or dismissing other approaches, and time will tell what's true.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #79 of 127
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Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

He's just shameless and relentless. We think he gets paid on a per-reply basis by the likes of Google nd Samsung.

And he claims to be paid on a per-reply basis by AppleInsider because they're the "only ones who would benefit from such an arrangement". Never mind that mindshare is more important than a single website's views.
post #80 of 127
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Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post

If you go back to post #66, you'll see that I had edited it to include that original text from Caliminius' post.

yes, however, it doesn't change the fact that several prominent reviews online, thus far, are giving praise to the Kindle Fire; it's a great product.
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  • Review roundup: Amazon Kindle Fire a bargain, but no threat to Apple's iPad
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