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Android malware has jumped up 472% since July - Page 3

post #81 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by redbarchetta View Post

iPhones and Androids are a device; they are not a way of life.

Grow up.


Lifestyle creation is an old, and seemingly very effective marketing and branding tool.

The dancing silhouette iPod commercials, for example, were all about that. The Pepsi Generation was all about that. I'm a Pepper. The Most Interesting Man in the World drinking some brand of beer.

All similar (but with many other aspects thrown it too, for maximum message), and AFAIK, all very effective.

Apple as been doing it very, very well since at least the intro of the Mac. Their shit is often "us against them", with Apple Users poised as superior in specific respects. Those respects change over the decades, to reflect and to reshape popular culture. Nobody wants to be John Hodgman's character. They are on Jason Long's team. Nobody wants to be a drone watching a repressive talking head - they want to be a rebel like the chick with the hammer.

Steve also rallied the troops, and maybe himself, with frequent allegations of wrongdoing by some enemy, requiring him and his to fight the good fight against the forces of evil and darkness. It started on Day One of the Mac, or for all I know, prior to that. There have been many targets of enmity over the years, which has depended upon Apple's business purposes. Recently, of course, Google and its customers are the Bad Guys, necessitating that ApplePeople band together to fight evil.

So don't be surprised that many folks have swallowed the marketing hook, line and sinker. Don't be surprised that they have altered their self-identity in precisely the manner that the corporation desired.

That is a phenomenon that many huge advertisers have exploited for years, and Apple is masterful at pulling it off.
post #82 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

android malware can 'just show up' on your phone. . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

no one said 'surprise' why are you adding that now? learn to read.

I added the word "surprise" because you indicated it "just shows up", as tho it wasn't requested, thus a surprise. That is what you meant to imply wasn't it? If not then your post was poorly worded IMHO. Really no matter tho and no need to let it upset you. Just trying to clarify things.
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post #83 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I added the word "surprise" because you indicated it "just shows up", as tho it wasn't requested, thus a surprise. That is what you meant to imply wasn't it? If not then your post was poorly worded IMHO. Really no matter tho and no need to let it upset you. Just trying to clarify things.

they can just show up. if i send you a sms or email it just 'shows up'. you didn't go looking for it.
post #84 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

rules are of value as intelligence drops. the stupid need rules to guide them. the wise do not.

I'm trying, intelligence, stupid, wise. I think you are mixing things up here. Wise people implement rules. Foolish people follow them without challenging them. However foolish people say we don't need rules. Good rules are perfectly fine. Rules should however never be regarded higher than the purpose it is serving. Even Steve Jobs who, by his own admission, is not "fond of rules" was wise enough to implement them.

Wise people are not wise all the time. Therefore you will need perfect people in order not to need rules. Rules are not only necessary to provide a wrong and right but also to judge those that offend them.

But maybe you should think it through a bit more before you write such a statement.
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post #85 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I couldn't find any malware in your link that uses email or SMS for surprise infections. They all look to be delivered via fake applications that a user purposefully downloads and installs.

no, you said 'surprise infections' i said 'they just show up'. i didn't say they 'just show up and infect you.'
post #86 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacShack View Post

I'm trying, intelligence, stupid, wise. I think you are mixing things up here. Wise people implement rules. Foolish people follow them without challenging them. However foolish people say we don't need rules. Good rules are perfectly fine. Rules should however never be regarded higher than the purpose it is serving. Even Steve Jobs who, by his own admission, is not "fond of rules" was wise enough to implement them.

Wise people are not wise all the time. Therefore you will need perfect people in order not to need rules. Rules are not only necessary to provide a wrong and right but also to judge those that offend them.

But maybe you should think it through a bit more before you write such a statement.

no. it is fine as it is written. you are free to debate it however.
post #87 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

no, you said 'surprise infections' i said 'they just show up'. i didn't say they 'just show up and infect you.'

No problem since we seem to agree that Android malware generally requires the cooperation of the user and isn't a drive-by infection. It's not unlike the recent wave of malware targeting Mac users which also required the user to approve the installation.
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post #88 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

No problem since we seem to agree that Android malware requires the cooperation of the user and aren't a drive-by infection. It's not unlike the recent wave of malware targeting Mac users which also required the user to approve the installation.

yes. users will be users no matter the platform...lol
post #89 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

No problem since we seem to agree that Android malware requires the cooperation of the user and aren't a drive-by infection. It's not unlike the recent wave of malware targeting Mac users which also required the user to approve the installation.

It's good thing for Android that most users use their devices as feature phones never installing a single app over the device's 3 month lifetime.
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post #90 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

It's good thing for Android that most users use their devices as feature phones never installing a single app over the device's 3 month lifetime.

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post #91 of 137
Why is it sooooo hard for some people to call a spade a spade and just admit that Apple was right, and iOS is the most secure mobile OS on the planet? This is not a technical argument, it's a results argument. Whatever the method, there appears to be zero malware for iOS (unless you jailbreak), so therefore it is a success. Is it really that painful to give credit where credit is due?
post #92 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by mytdave View Post

Why is it sooooo hard for some people to call a spade a spade and just admit that Apple was right, and iOS is the most secure mobile OS on the planet? This is not a technical argument, it's a results argument. Whatever the method, there appears to be zero malware for iOS (unless you jailbreak), so therefore it is a success. Is it really that painful to give credit where credit is due?

It's not that iOS is inherently more secure than Android. It's that the "walled garden" that it exists within keeps most malware at bay. A jail-broken iDevice running iOS can be infected as easily as one running Android.

Keeping the approved interactions with iOS devices limited to Apple-moderation certainly allows iPhone and iPad users a higher level of comfort if they're concerned about malware. I suspect it never crosses the mind of most who stay to the official app markets for the platforms.
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post #93 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

It's good thing for Android that most users use their devices as feature phones never installing a single app over the device's 3 month lifetime.



Good one. But you forgot the smilies.


post #94 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

[...] An August report from McAfee found that Android had become the most-targeted platform for malware while iOS was untouched.

That's enough to convince corporate IT to go with iPad. Android's malware problem, fragmentation, and shaky legal standing all add up to a big zero in enterprise.

Apple Insider story on iPad's 96 percent corporate market share: http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...work_with.html

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post #95 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by mytdave View Post

Why is it sooooo hard for some people to call a spade a spade and just admit that Apple was right, and iOS is the most secure mobile OS on the planet? This is not a technical argument, it's a results argument. Whatever the method, there appears to be zero malware for iOS (unless you jailbreak), so therefore it is a success. Is it really that painful to give credit where credit is due?

Everything you say is true.

But it is only half the story. In exchange for getting only vetted software, you give up the ability to install other capable software that the device manufacturer does not approve of.

That works perfectly OK for lots and lots of people. The game console manufacturers use that model.

But it is not OK for a lot of people who want to have a tiny general purpose computer in their pocket.

So iOS is most certainly very, very secure. But in exchange, you couldn't, for example, use the volume rocker to take pictures in Photo + (or whatever). Or have your apps in folders at first, or a bunch of other things. You still can't for example, repurpose a portion of your storage on the device as mass storage for carrying around random data.

To call a spade a spade, as you seem to prefer to do, would be to keep both sides of the equation in mind, and to choose whichever you prefer.
post #96 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

To call a spade a spade, as you seem to prefer to do, would be to keep both sides of the equation in mind, and to choose whichever you prefer.

Well said.
post #97 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

You do realize you've created a strawman right?

...

Could Google gain a lot by adopting some stricter controls? most likely.

Could Apple gain a lot by easing up a bit? most likely.

Are they both doing fine as they are? Yes.

Is this entire malware thing blown out of proportion? Definitely.

Can you clarify how Apple (or iPhone customers for that matter) could gain if Apple "eased up a bit"? Specifically iPhone customers since I don't much care if Apple gains or not. Please be specific about the ways in which Apple could ease up and how these measures would directly benefit iPhone users.
post #98 of 137
I think, first, it is important to understand that all the phones are in a "walled-garden" to some extent when you are running someone else's OS (iOS, android, symbian, MS) as are all computer programs at this point and probably for the foreseeable future since they are all code based.
A little negative proof hopefully will clear this up:
Can you on any platform run a program that does not conform to the code inherent in the OS? No.
You must craft the code to follow the programming that enables the phone itself to run.
For instance can I build a mobile app in fortran and then run it it directly in iOS or Android? No.
Those gardens don't understand the language and therefore don't provide the framework to enable the app to run let alone install. The whole API aspect supports this point as well.
And both the Android and iOS gardens are huge. There are probably incredibly few (likely less than one in a billion, 7 in the whole world) who have walked every square foot of either garden and the perimeters. If these people exist, more likely they did not find that there is absolutely no way to do things they wanted. The challenge, which is more likely what they sought in all this searching, is figuring out how to do so within defined parameters. This is what Gates, Jobs, the google guys, were driven by within the bigger garden, since they each still operate in the larger computer garden as began with Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace n the 1830's. They have cultivated new plants in different parts of the garden and put up little fences to keep some other plants out, but still in the bigger garden. Sometimes they argue who planted a new shrub, cross-bed different flowers, or stole seeds which were sometimes carried on the wind of change or the pockets of gardeners, but they were all trying to make something that others would come in and enjoy, find useful, while limiting the amount of trampling a public can easily muster.
Second, anarchy is
• a state of disorder due to absence or nonrecognition of authority
Android is not anarchy, nor is IOS the opposite. Why because the phones do as you, the user in your specific garden, tell them to do, not other way around. (see above)
They don't randomly execute tasks in a non-consistent fashion e.g. hitting the answer call icon does not sometimes answer the phone call and other times open a browser, the last game played, install an app, etc. It always is tied to answering the call, as the software code (rules) dictates this must be the action. On the other end, the OS does not make you answer the call, force you to take a call you want to ignore, install updates you don't want.
The differences between OS's are much more subtle. There are differences in implementation however. iOS seems to approach the situation from a lessons learned incorporated up front while android has a more individual learning model. Both have merit at times. The ancient greeks debated this spectrum and most would agree that there are some experiences that don't need to be tried to know the outcome e.g. converting all text, code, writing in my phone permanently to hexadecimal will be problematic to efficient function, while others are less serious e.g. installing obscure russian porn apps developed by Vlad the Rich Pillager, are certainly for the more curious and risk-tolerant. Depending on where your risk meter is and what you need and expect the phone to do and the amount of time you are willing to wager on retracing steps is more a determination of personal positional at your current moment. This is why some people upgrade their OS (on a phone or a computer) immediately and others remain with an older version despite the new features.
With more being done on phones, many will see its efficiency as paramount, like companies dealing in financial transactions need failure rates to be outside of six sigma standards (less than a 0.000001 chance of failure), and other companies may see the need to be able to try some thing new in order to develop a new niche or market. Others, many probably, are still experiencing the new technology much as children do a new toy i.e. attracted by the attention given to it by other children, the sights and sounds and things it does, and without any explicit purpose other than to play with it. Each position is inherently right for their own reasons, but sometimes marketing, that attention of other children, can lead to someone not having the phone they want. And that is when the wailing begins that every adult wishes they could mute.
post #99 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by russgriz View Post

Can you clarify how Apple (or iPhone customers for that matter) could gain if Apple "eased up a bit"? Specifically iPhone customers since I don't much care if Apple gains or not. Please be specific about the ways in which Apple could ease up and how these measures would directly benefit iPhone users.

IMO, Apple has already eased up considerably.

It used to be that every couple of weeks there would be a gaffe like axing an app containing caricatures by a Pulitzer winner, or whatever.

I haven't heard about anything like that lately.
post #100 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

Lifestyle creation is an old, and seemingly very effective marketing and branding tool.

The dancing silhouette iPod commercials, for example, were all about that. The Pepsi Generation was all about that. I'm a Pepper. The Most Interesting Man in the World drinking some brand of beer.

All similar (but with many other aspects thrown it too, for maximum message), and AFAIK, all very effective.

I don't necessarily disagree with most of what you wrote, but here's the problem. You're taking products that hold so much of our lives, our photos, movies, emails, personal info, etc., devices that are often the starting point for our social and work lives, devices we use to communicate with friends and family--and you're trying to compare that to Pepsi or beer?

Lifestyle marketing may be a tried and true hook and Apple clearly knows how to take advantage of that approach, but the flaw in your logic is assuming that's all there is to it. Consider how personal the product is that you're talking about. Hell, even the iPod becomes a statement about your life and your personality by virtue of the fact that it's filled with stuff you like. Computers and mobile devices like music players and phones and tablets are tied in to your lifestyle and trying to criticize them on that basis is missing the forest for the trees. Apple may use the same marketing tactics a car or beer company uses, but that doesn't put those products on the same level and it doesn't mean someone is shallow or falling for marketing hype for viewing it that way.
post #101 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

I think, first, it is important to understand that all the phones are in a "walled-garden"


Redefining the term does not satisfy anybody who dislikes the Apple way of doing things.

Call it a Rose. Call it a Spade. Call it a Walled Garden.

Or don't. It really doesn't change anything.

And just in case you thought otherwise, RDF techniques never work in writing. They rely on the victim's inability to detect the flaw and to issue a good comeback. People can sit and think about stuff when it is in writing, so they are not flummoxed so easily.
post #102 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

But it is only half the story. In exchange for getting only vetted software, you give up the ability to install other capable software that the device manufacturer does not approve of.

Some prefer to live with reasonable restrictions that protect their general welfare rather than to live with complete lawlessness. Neither choice offers total freedom.

Personally, I prefer living in a society where the authorities protect the citizens rather than a place where I have to be on vigil to defend myself from constant threat of attack.

As you say, select which ever you prefer.

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post #103 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by inkswamp View Post



Lifestyle marketing may be a tried and true hook and Apple clearly knows how to take advantage of that approach, but the flaw in your logic is assuming that's all there is to it.

...

Computers and mobile devices like music players and phones and tablets are tied in to your lifestyle and trying to criticize them on that basis is missing the forest for the trees.

I never criticized Apple products on the basis that they are tied into your lifestyle. I never assumed that all there is to it is Apple's choice of marketing approach.

Instead, I said that Apple chose their approach well. And that Apple does a good job using its chosen approach.

The fact that certain products are, indeed, tied to your lifestyle is a good reason why such an approach makes oodles of sense for a company like Apple or Pepsico. The products made by such companies are in consumer areas where you can convince people to become a Pepper.

Likely it wouldn't work with many other types of products.
post #104 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

The Malware doesn't just show up on your phone. You have to find an app, install an app, ignore the permissions, confirm you want to install the app and then install the app, and in most cases (if not all) open the app.

It's not like your phone is a frail person and the malware is a gang of angry youths intent on ruining your day.

Not for the ones that root the phone and never ask for permissions. These exist in the Android Market. Sounds like you might be an easy target.
post #105 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Some prefer to live with reasonable restrictions that protect their general welfare rather than to live with complete lawlessness. Neither choice offers total freedom.

Personally, I prefer living in a society where the authorities protect the citizens rather than a place where I have to be on vigil to defend myself from constant threat of attack.

As you say, select which ever you prefer.

If those two choices accurately described the state of things, the choice would be easy.



Meanwhile, back in the real world, it sounds to me like you would prefer to buy software from a trusted source, like Best Buy or the Amazon Appstore for Android or Apple's iOS store. I think that makes sense for most people.

Other people do that and also find cool stuff elsewhere to install. You are unable to do that using iOS, but you don't mind.

That's fine.
post #106 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

... RDF techniques never work in writing...People can sit and think about stuff when it is in writing, so they are not flummoxed so easily.

That is exactly why I wrote what I wrote


When telepathy becomes common we will only have death to limit the RDF since writing will be overwritten after it is read by the invading thoughts of other people.

Oh wait that is what Appleinsider does to my attempts to memorize everything while in medical school.
post #107 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by benanderson89 View Post

The worlds most popular mobile platform... I doubt its via obscurity.

The worlds most popular mobile platform would be Nokia's series 40
post #108 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

The worlds most popular mobile platform would be Nokia's series 40

yeah, but it has an obscurity field for it ... now that Nokia is doomed!!!!
post #109 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

If those two choices accurately described the state of things, the choice would be easy.

Meanwhile, back in the real world, it sounds to me like you would prefer to buy software from a trusted source, like Best Buy or the Amazon Appstore for Android or Apple's iOS store. I think that makes sense for most people.

Best Buy and Amazon may be trusted by proxy if the software publisher is trusted, but they don't test any of the applications, they just resell them. Apple, on the other hand, actually does some enforcement. If the software publisher is trustworthy they will be on the AppStore anyway.

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post #110 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by benanderson89 View Post

The worlds most popular mobile platform... I doubt its via obscurity.

Here's an interesting tidbit, offered for developers when making business plans.

"Apple receives far more publicity than any other mobile-phone manufacturer, but on the world stage it is still a pretty small player (though fast-growing). Before media hype lulls you into focusing your marketing/development budget on the Apple platform exclusively, consider this: 96.5 percent of mobile users don’t have one – mostly they use Nokia or Samsung; and even among smartphone users 84 percent don’t have an Apple."
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post #111 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

yeah, but it has an obscurity field for it ... now that Nokia is doomed!!!!

That guy always tries to be pedantic and always fails. I can't imagine how low one's level of critical thinking must be to see the iOS referred to as the most popular mobile OS to read that to mean the most widely distributed.

Series 40 = Most widely used mobile OS.
iOS (or maybe even Android) = Most popular mobile OS(es).
pop•u•lar |ˈpɑpjələr|
adjective
1 liked, admired, or enjoyed by many people or by a particular person or group: she was one of the most popular girls in the school | these cheeses are very popular in Europe.
2 [ attrib. ] (of cultural activities or products) intended for or suited to the taste, understanding, or means of the general public rather than specialists or intellectuals: the popular press.
• (of a belief or attitude) held by the majority of the general public: many adult cats, contrary to popular opinion, dislike milk.
3 [ attrib. ] (of political activity) of or carried on by the people as a whole rather than restricted to politicians or political parties: a popular revolt against colonial rule.
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post #112 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

and even among smartphone users 84 percent don’t have an Apple.

I wonder what percent of those non-iOS device users actually download any apps. I would guess a very large percentage use only the built in apps and never even visit an appstore. Apple users tend to buy more apps and use more data than all the other platforms because it is enjoyable and easy to use for many purposes. The Android users I know only use the built in features. Sure the geeky Android users download apps, but they are a very small minority and also tend to use mostly free apps, so developers are more profitable on iOS even if they do support Android as well.

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post #113 of 137
Had a fandroid here at work call me "a F'in idiot" for not having an antivirus on my iPhone.


I simply asked him how I could be an idiot for not having something that doesn't exist. He still doesn't talk to me, it has been the best two weeks.
post #114 of 137
"As OS X grows in popularity, it'll get more viruses. You'll see."

Well. Here's a stepping stone. Apple has a huge portion of the smartphone market and 90% of the tablet market. Where's the malware for that? That's OS X. So what's the deal here?

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #115 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I wonder what percent of those non-iOS device users actually download any apps. I would guess a very large percentage use only the built in apps and never even visit an appstore. Apple users tend to buy more apps and use more data than all the other platforms because it is enjoyable and easy to use for many purposes. The Android users I know only use the built in features. Sure the geeky Android users download apps, but they are a very small minority and also tend to use mostly free apps, so developers are more profitable on iOS even if they do support Android as well.

last year the average iPhone user had downloaded 40 apps, while those with Android averaged 25.
http://www.intomobile.com/2010/09/10...blackberry-14/

Approx. 7 months later (April this year), the Apple users had averaged 48, but Android users picked up the pace significantly percentage-wise, jumping to an average of 35 apps per user.
http://technolog.msnbc.msn.com/_news...pp-downloaders

You should keep in mind too that yet another study found that 1 in 4 apps downloaded by Apple users were never used again after the download. As for using more data, Apple users are the biggest game-players, spending nearly 15 hours a month on their iDevices chewing up game-play, almost twice as much as Android users (who spend twice as much time on game-play as feature-phone owners). That may be the biggest chunk of that data use.

yet another thing to note when making comparison's of free vs. paid apps. Many of the most popular paid apps on iOS are free to Android users. It's easy to understand why Apple users tend to have a higher percentage of paid apps. Of course Apple's app prices are steadily coming down while the average price for a paid app on Android is going up, good news for developers I would think.
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post #116 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

Not for the ones that root the phone and never ask for permissions. These exist in the Android Market. Sounds like you might be an easy target.

Except those don't exist.

I guess I should also watch out for the boogieman?
post #117 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

That guy always tries to be pedantic and always fails. I can't imagine how low one's level of critical thinking must be to see the iOS referred to as the most popular mobile OS to read that to mean the most widely distributed.

Series 40 = Most widely used mobile OS.
iOS (or maybe even Android) = Most popular mobile OS(es).
popular |ˈpɑpjələr|
adjective
1 liked, admired, or enjoyed by many people or by a particular person or group: she was one of the most popular girls in the school | these cheeses are very popular in Europe.
2 [ attrib. ] (of cultural activities or products) intended for or suited to the taste, understanding, or means of the general public rather than specialists or intellectuals: the popular press.
(of a belief or attitude) held by the majority of the general public: many adult cats, contrary to popular opinion, dislike milk.
3 [ attrib. ] (of political activity) of or carried on by the people as a whole rather than restricted to politicians or political parties: a popular revolt against colonial rule.

Again, you constantly abuse me, even though you have constantly promised to ignore me. Why won't you ignore me? Is it because you like to report me when I prove you wrong, which you constantly are?

Now, I don't need to remind you where the little red exclamation mark, as you are constantly clicking it every time someone challenges you.

Look at option two, the very definition that makes Series 40 the worlds most popular mobile platform.

Now, off you go, click on the the report button, I know you want to...
post #118 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Approx. 7 months later (April this year), the Apple users had averaged 48, but Android users picked up the pace significantly percentage-wise, jumping to an average of 35 apps per user.

Thanks for providing your reference links. I am kind of skeptical of the numbers though. I did not go digging for the actual survey stats but I think they are talking about the US only and the initial article did not mention the survey size or whether the types of users were equivalent. Was it equal numbers of iPhones and Android users? Was it Androids of similar price points to iPhones, etc?

Clearly high end Android users are as likely to buy apps as iPhone users but what about the models of Android devices that are only marginally advanced over old feature phones. I just can't see those super cheap users downloading any where near 35 apps. The numbers seem inflated when considering all Android phones. Also the worldwide numbers might present a much larger discrepancy between the two platforms as well.

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post #119 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

So iOS is most certainly very, very secure. But in exchange, you couldn't, for example, use the volume rocker to take pictures in Photo + (or whatever). Or have your apps in folders at first, or a bunch of other things. You still can't for example, repurpose a portion of your storage on the device as mass storage for carrying around random data.

To call a spade a spade, as you seem to prefer to do, would be to keep both sides of the equation in mind, and to choose whichever you prefer.

Both sides? Where's your mention that a large number of Android phones sold in 2011 will be unable to update to the newest Android OS?

As you reference, even the 1st 2 items listed by you have now appeared in iOS updates available to all iPhones released in the past 2 years.

So, I will 'call a spade a spade':

iOS has an App Store that allows Apple to review (or censor) whichever apps they wish. In return, they deliver a more stable, more secure, and better liked (per cust sat scores) OS for which they deliver consistent updates that are available to any phone still under its initial contract.

Android offers a more customizable OS and less regulated AppStore (or whatever their name is). In return, you can get features not available in iOS or Apple's App Store. You also get an operating system that usually leaves phones obsolete and unable to update after a year or less and is less well liked than iOS.

Question: After 1 year, is iOS or Android more 'open'? iOS may censor apps, but Android cannot deliver an up-to-date OS.


In conclusion, I think that ConradJoe makes some very good points in favor of the Android platform. But, I also find your posts to be insulting and more than a little condescending at times. You state that whatever one may choose is 'fine', but 2 pages ago you were stating that 'experienced, intelligent, and professional' people choose Android, but that iOS is fine for 'amateurs'. For all the reasonableness of your arguments, insinuating that I am inexperienced, unintelligent, and amateurish for purchasing and liking my iPhone is downright insulting and contrary to the attitude that you seem to project otherwise (namely that everyone can choose for themselves and that's fine). Please don't undercut your well-reasoned arguments with statements that question the intelligence of iOS users.
post #120 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by redbarchetta View Post

Most smartphone owners don't own iPhones, which suggests it's not that important to most people.

Newest Android ad campaign:

'Security: It's not that important.'
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