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Apple reportedly reduced iPad 2 orders because it bought 16M last quarter

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 
An overabundance of iPad 2 components purchased by Apple last quarter has allowed the company to actually draw down its orders ahead of the holidays due to an excess of parts, which will allow it to build between 4 million and 5 million units.

Last quarter, Apple sold a record 11.2 million iPad units, representing a year over year sales increase of 166 percent. But the company actually placed orders for components that could build between 15 and 16 million iPad units, according to DigiTimes.

Apple now has a stockpile of between 4 million and 5 million iPad 2 units in its supply chain, which has put the company in a position to adjust its orders for the current holiday quarter. Specifically, panel shipments for Samsung, LG and Chimei Innolux are said to be affected in the quarter.

"Due to inventory adjustments at Apple, LG Display saw its shipments of 9.7-inch panels to Apple decline from three million units in September to 2.5 million units in October," the report said. "Samsung managed to keep its shipments of 9.7-inch panels flat at two million units in October, while CMI slashed its shipments from 700,000 units to 350,000 units during the same month, said the sources."

While Apple is allegedly drawing down inventory for its current-generation iPad 2, the company is already gearing up for its third-generation iPad, expected to debut in early 2012. The report said that both Samsung and Sharp are already shipping panels for the next-generation iPad, while TPK Holding and Wintek are expected to ship panels for the third-generation tablet in November and December.

Earlier this month, the same publication indicated that Apple is stockpiling about 2 million third-generation iPad units by the end of 2011. The device is expected to be thinner and have a higher-resolution screen than the current iPad 2.



As for the rumored drawdown in purchases of iPad 2 components, Taiwan's Commercial Times claimed earlier this month that Apple had cut orders not only for the iPad 2, but also for the iPhone 4S, leading into the fourth quarter of calendar 2011. The report claimed that sales were not as high as Apple anticipated, and the company's stock subsequently dropped off.

But analysts on Wall Street dismissed concerns about the iPhone 4S, as the newly launched handset has been consistently selling out at Apple retail stores, while new international launches have drawn huge crowds around the world.
post #2 of 47
It's all about manipulating AAPL, period.
post #3 of 47
Nice spin being placed upon a decline in demand for the iPad. It almost makes the decline sound like a good thing. The problem is, even if you believe the spin, it casts Apple in a bad light, i.e., they are not able to manage their parts inventory properly.
post #4 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Earlier this month, the same publication indicated that Apple is stockpiling about 2 million third-generation iPad units by the end of 2011. The device is expected to be thinner and have a higher-resolution screen than the current iPad 2.

Why do people keep paying attention to someone who has so consistently been wrong in the past?

Oh, yeah. Click-whoring. Never mind.
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Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #5 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by camper View Post

Nice spin being placed upon a decline in demand for the iPad. It almost makes the decline sound like a good thing. The problem is, even if you believe the spin, it casts Apple in a bad light, i.e., they are not able to manage their parts inventory properly.

There is no "decline in demand", Apple will sell more iPads this quarter than last quarter, that's called an increase in demand. But nice attempt at misconstruing the facts.

All that's really happening here is that Apple, AS THEY ALWAYS HAVE, are ramping down production of the current model to clear inventory for a new model. It is happening sooner than usual because manufacturing has FINALLY been able to keep up and surpass demand.

During the 3rd calendar quarter, Apple has a history of ramping up production in an attempt to stock pile inventory for the back to school season and the following holiday season in the 4th quarter. Previously, manufacturing has barely been able to keep up with demand, so orders from Apple to component suppliers usually have stayed steady through the 4th quarter.

However this year, it seems that Apple has finally been able to buy enough manufacturing lines, that they can begin to decrease production before the release of the next model.
Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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post #6 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by camper View Post

Nice spin being placed upon a decline in demand for the iPad. It almost makes the decline sound like a good thing. The problem is, even if you believe the spin, it casts Apple in a bad light, i.e., they are not able to manage their parts inventory properly.

You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. Apple stockpiled components ahead of, and in anticipation of the holidays and therefore doesn't need to stay at the same order levels for iPad 2, especially as they prepare for the new iPad 3. So before you make such stupid statements you should really get yourself an education about this company and how they operate.
post #7 of 47
Wait, isn't stockpiling units like this the sort of thing that you guys normally criticise Samsung, HTC et-al about?
post #8 of 47
And the shorts are having a wonderful holiday season as Apple stock continues to be manipulated.
post #9 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

It's all about manipulating AAPL, period.

5 points drop today I bet
post #10 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

Wait, isn't stockpiling units like this the sort of thing that you guys normally criticise Samsung, HTC et-al about?

EVEN IF the report is true (which I doubt), there's a difference.

Apple would have done what most companies with good retail presence do. Build plenty of units for the Christmas season to make sure that they have plenty of stock. Since sales will drop after the Christmas season and there's a lead time to get them into the stores, it would not be surprising for production plans for Nov and Dec to be lower than Aug, Sept, and Oct.

(Of course, when Apple's Jan-March sales are lower than Oct-Dec, we'll get another round of "iPad sales decline" fear mongering).

What Samsung, HTC, et al appear to have done was manufacture far more units than they could sell to stuff the channel - and will then end up giving credits for unsold units. How many unsold iPads do you think there will be?
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post #11 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

Wait, isn't stockpiling units like this the sort of thing that you guys normally criticise Samsung, HTC et-al about?

The difference is that Apple has sold 11 million of its stocked iPads and is projected to sell the remaining units during the holidays. Plus this stockpile is intended as they can reduce the amount of manufacturing for the current iPad and focus on producing the 3rd generation iPad and ramp up 4S related productions and reservation of components through the holidays.

The criticism comes from stockpiling millions of units and have no demand/not selling them.
post #12 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

Wait, isn't stockpiling units like this the sort of thing that you guys normally criticise Samsung, HTC et-al about?

Can't recall anyone badmouthing Samsung for stockpiling components. The usual beef is with channel stuffing, where unsold inventory sits on retailers shelves while helping inflate "shipped" numbers that are then conflated with "sold."
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post #13 of 47
For some reason, I think Tim Cook knows what he's doing.
post #14 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

Wait, isn't stockpiling units like this the sort of thing that you guys normally criticise Samsung, HTC et-al about?

Get back to me if Apple ever has a fire sale.

(actually, a lot of the original Galaxy Tabs weren't even sold... they were given away free if you bought a washer, stove, couch, toaster, deep fryer, gerbil etc.)
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post #15 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

Wait, isn't stockpiling units like this the sort of thing that you guys normally criticise Samsung, HTC et-al about?

No channel stuffing to boost short terms numbers is what they do - Apple does not do this.

Note how a lot of companies talk about how many units "shipped" vs, "sold." Apple talk sold, companies trying to mask the reality tend to talk shipped.
post #16 of 47
Will you fandroid trolls ever learn?

Apple product on the shelves = product sold
Android product on the shelves = channel stuffing, shipping, ...

Apple product available online: inventory about to be sold
Android product available online: inventory to be written off

Never mind the 600,000+ activations per day
post #17 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by 801 View Post

For some reason, I think Tim Cook knows what he's doing.

Here's my guess:

The component manufacturers are sitting on Apple parts which they have already paid to make, but have not yet been able to sell to Apple. Apple cuts orders. Apple demands discounts and threatens to further cut orders. Desperate component manufacturers comply.

Tim is masterful.
post #18 of 47
A little off topic I know, but is anyone else having problems with their Safari crashing? Mine started a few weeks ago, and crashes EVERY session I uses my iPad. At least two or three times a session. Getting really tired of this......
post #19 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

Wait, isn't stockpiling units like this the sort of thing that you guys normally criticise Samsung, HTC et-al about?

Stockpiling units in face of uncertain demand is stupid.

Stockpiling units in anticipation of heavy demand is good inventory management.
post #20 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blitz1 View Post

Will you fandroid trolls ever learn?

Apple product on the shelves = product sold
Android product on the shelves = channel stuffing, shipping, ...

Apple product available online: inventory about to be sold
Android product available online: inventory to be written off

Never mind the 600,000+ activations per day

When will you learn that now that Steve is dead, Apple is on its way back to the 1990's, an also run.
post #21 of 47
  • Estimate Requirements
  • Add Cushion (Acceptable ± margin of error)
  • Execute
  • Measure Perormance
  • Determine Necessary Adjustments
  • Make Adjustments
  • Repeat


It's called Supply Chain Management!


It is done on a micro level (part) a macro level (product) and every level in between!

It is done yearly, quarterly, monthly... daily if necessary!

It is what Apple does better than anyone else.


And where possible they select and reward suppliers who are agile enough to adjust to changing requirements.


It does Apple no good if its suppliers are losing money sitting on unsold parts or manufacturing capacity.

Apple furnishes its suppliers with reasonable estimates on its requirements and is contractually allowed to adjust these as needed. A good supplier prepares for this and does it's own Estimate-Adjust cycle.


To put it in Household terms:

We want at least 1 turkey, 1 ham and 1 Prime Rib for the holidays.

If we can find a good price we could buy more than 1 each.

We, normally, have no space for these in the freezer.

For the past month or so we have been drawing down our food (parts) inventory to free up freezer space to meet anticipated needs.

We have a little extra space in the Fridge Freezer -- if some [un]anticipated food item catches our eye.

We plan for opportunity -- and to deliver the best results at the lowest cost.

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post #22 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blitz1 View Post

Will you fandroid trolls ever learn?

Apple product on the shelves = product sold
Android product on the shelves = channel stuffing, shipping, ...

Apple product available online: inventory about to be sold
Android product available online: inventory to be written off

Never mind the 600,000+ activations per day

Wrong. Apple products don't sit on the shelves long. Apple sells > 99.9% of the products it ships. Android products, otoh, sit for weeks. You never hear about any sell outs unless it is one or two "flagship" phones.

As for the activations, it's 550000 but most of those are cheapy phones in which the user doesn't even use the "android-ness" of the phone.
post #23 of 47
Did AppleInsider just post an article referring to the next iPad without naming it "iPad 3"????
Wow. +1 Keep up the good work

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post #24 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

Wrong. Apple products don't sit on the shelves long. Apple sells > 99.9% of the products it ships. Android products, otoh, sit for weeks. You never hear about any sell outs unless it is one or two "flagship" phones.

As for the activations, it's 550000 but most of those are cheapy phones in which the user doesn't even use the "android-ness" of the phone.

The best-selling Android phones in the past year have been among the most expensive, on par price-wise(within $50 or less) with Apple's iPhone4.

As for whether iPhones/iPads sit on shelves, that's hard for anyone to say with certainty. Apple reports them as "sold" once Wal-mart, Verizon, Best Buy or whoever has paid for them and taken delivery. With Apple iPads, iPods, and iPhones in stock, on shelves, or in stockrooms and warehouses at thousands of Apple retail partners, claiming 99.9 are in consumer's hands would be a tough argument to prove.
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post #25 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

The best-selling Android phones in the past year have been among the most expensive, on par price-wise(within $50 or less) with Apple's iPhone4.

As for whether iPhones/iPads sit on shelves, that's hard for anyone to say with certainty. Apple reports them as "sold" once Wal-mart, Verizon, Best Buy or whoever has paid for them and taken delivery. With Apple iPads, iPods, and iPhones in stock, on shelves, or in stockrooms and warehouses at thousands of Apple retail partners, claiming 99.9 are in consumer's hands would be a tough argument to prove.


No, Apple reports sold to end-users. The other electronics company reports shipped to the retail. And it's pretty easy to tell, go to those stores and see if they have any iProducts left and ask how long it's been sitting. The iphone 4 and 3GS were the top selling phones in the US last quarter. I did mention some flag ship phones for Android may have sold out...
post #26 of 47
Consumer Reports: Apples iPad, iPhone top many holiday shopping lists this year

Apple seems poised for a strong holiday season, at least according to two new surveys. Both those doing the shopping and those writing up their own personal wish lists seem to be in sync about one thing: Apples iPad and iPhone are in high demand.

http://gigaom.com/apple/apples-ipad-...sts-this-year/

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post #27 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Did AppleInsider just post an article referring to the next iPad without naming it "iPad 3"????
Wow. +1 Keep up the good work

Yeah... It's an iPad 5, with:
-- A7 CPU (which is based on an ARM A10 with 8 cores and 4 Core GPU)
-- iOS 6.0
-- Siri 2.0
-- Cell Radio 4G
-- Due 3Q 12

Internal code named: BoWahDiddle

3-6-9-12...
who do we like better than ourselves

BoWahDiddle...
BoWahDiddle...

Yay, BoWahDiddle!
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post #28 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

The best-selling Android phones in the past year have been among the most expensive, on par price-wise(within $50 or less) with Apple's iPhone4.

That doesn't mean anything in terms of the actual installed product mix, however. There are dozens, if not hundreds of Android handsets on the market. Being a "best seller" under those conditions just means selling more than any one other handset, which doesn't mean that all those other handsets aren't selling in vastly more numbers, in the aggregate.

Quote:
As for whether iPhones/iPads sit on shelves, that's hard for anyone to say with certainty. Apple reports them as "sold" once Wal-mart, Verizon, Best Buy or whoever has paid for them and taken delivery. With Apple iPads, iPods, and iPhones in stock, on shelves, or in stockrooms and warehouses at thousands of Apple retail partners, claiming 99.9 are in consumer's hands would be a tough argument to prove.

Yeah, those long waits to get your hands on an iPhone or iPad, the frequent sell-outs and Apple's near continuous struggle to meet demand are because vendors are just willy-nilly ordering truckloads of product that isn't needed so they can have excess inventory.
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post #29 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

No, Apple reports sold to end-users. The other electronics company reports shipped to the retail.

Apple's official 10K filing with the SEC says:
“(Apple) recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred, the sales price is fixed or determinable, and collection is probable. Product is considered delivered to the customer once it has been shipped and title and risk of loss have been transferred. For most of (Apple)’s product sales, these criteria are met at the time the product is shipped.. . ."

As far as Apple is concerned when reporting quarterly results, the "sale" occurred when Best Buy, Wal-mart, etc took delivery of the product.
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post #30 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

Wrong. Apple products don't sit on the shelves long. Apple sells > 99.9% of the products it ships. Android products, otoh, sit for weeks. You never hear about any sell outs unless it is one or two "flagship" phones.

As for the activations, it's 550000 but most of those are cheapy phones in which the user doesn't even use the "android-ness" of the phone.

Can't you read?????

I just said that only Apple sells whilst Android are now filling shelves going from Anchorage to Seoul via Brussels and Johannesburg. No-one buys these stuff. The activation figures are a lie!
post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

The best-selling Android phones in the past year have been among the most expensive, on par price-wise(within $50 or less) with Apple's iPhone4.

As for whether iPhones/iPads sit on shelves, that's hard for anyone to say with certainty. Apple reports them as "sold" once Wal-mart, Verizon, Best Buy or whoever has paid for them and taken delivery. With Apple iPads, iPods, and iPhones in stock, on shelves, or in stockrooms and warehouses at thousands of Apple retail partners, claiming 99.9 are in consumer's hands would be a tough argument to prove.

Once again, you should really stop posting about business issues since you clearly don't understand the way it works.

Apple presumably counts it as a sale when shipped. It has nothing to do with when the customer takes delivery - and certainly not when the retailer has paid for them.

Normal terms in retail are 30 days or more after shipment. Last time I did business with Walmart, they insisted on payment 90 days after delivery. Either way, the iPad is almost certainly sold long before the retailer pays Apple for it. Yet another advantage to Apple being so cash-rich. They don't need to rely on payments for today's cash needs.
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post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

The best-selling Android phones in the past year have been among the most expensive, on par price-wise(within $50 or less) with Apple's iPhone4.

Is that really true?

I was in a Radio Sack yesterday, and I was surprised at how many free smartphones were available. Some of them were pretty nice looking.

The coolest phones, of course, cost anywhere between $150 and $300. Are they really the best sellers?


And BTW, I was handling a bunch of different phones with gigantic screens, trying to figure out if they were too big for my hands, or too big for my pockets. I have large hands, and I was able to traverse the whole screen with my thumb without a problem, even on the biggest. And several of the really big ones were extremely thin, except for a small area housing the camera or part of the battery or whatever. It seemed with some of them that the thicker portion added to the feel in the hand - it made it easy to hold the phone, while adding something much smaller than a pack of gum to the bulk.

But is it really true that the more expensive phones outsell the cheap/free phones in general? Recently we saw that the i4S was outselling the FreeGS, which is evidence in favor. But I've not really examined the lists of best selling phones in enough detail to know if the expensive ones are outselling the cheapies in all cases.

And it is significant that more people go with a free iPhone than buy any Android phone at any price. That is strong evidence that Free is a very powerful tool, especially when coupled with an otherwise less desirable product.

So do the expensive phones dominate the top 10? Are there notable exceptions like the FreeGS, or are there enough cheapies in the list to conclude that FreePhones are doing as well as SOTA phones?
post #33 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Apple's official 10K filing with the SEC says:
“(Apple) recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred, the sales price is fixed or determinable, and collection is probable. Product is considered delivered to the customer once it has been shipped and title and risk of loss have been transferred. For most of (Apple)’s product sales, these criteria are met at the time the product is shipped.. . ."

As far as Apple is concerned when reporting quarterly results, the "sale" occurred when Best Buy, Wal-mart, etc took delivery of the product.

Yes!

Apple also says (in answer to earnings call questions) that they try and maintain a 4-6 week supply of product in the channel -- so they have a continuous supply of product to sell.

This will vary: new product ramp-up; older product EOL; seasonal supply and demand; unforeseen shortages/disasters; promotions...

Apple knows what each reseller has in stock (reported weekly or daily).

They take extra care to avoid excess inventory anywhere in the supply chain.

Everyone loses if product sits in inventory and has to be returned -- incurring extra costs, upsetting the supply chain balance.

Ideally, every reseller would be stocking the shelf with a just-delivered product as the customer reaches to buy it...

This is an unattainable goal -- the maintenance of product in the channel provides a buffer.

Apple is unique in they do not allow resellers to set the price (other than a percent or so discount).

This all means that Apple must police and maintain a channel balance!


Apple does not channel stuff -- Apple managers or Mfgr reps who try to do so are replaced.


I have no experience with Rim, Sony, Moogle, Sammy et all -- but it is quite obvious they are shipping a lot more to resellers than are being sold to customers (by whatever agreements).

That is channel stuffing!


And the results of channel stuffing are heavy discounts!
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post #34 of 47
iPad, other iOS devices top kids' holiday wish lists, says study from Nielsen


http://news.cnet.com/8301-27076_3-57...ol;editorPicks

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post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

Is that really true?

I was in a Radio Sack yesterday, and I was surprised at how many free smartphones were available. Some of them were pretty nice looking.

The coolest phones, of course, cost anywhere between $150 and $300. Are they really the best sellers?


And BTW, I was handling a bunch of different phones with gigantic screens, trying to figure out if they were too big for my hands, or too big for my pockets. I have large hands, and I was able to traverse the whole screen with my thumb without a problem, even on the biggest. And several of the really big ones were extremely thin, except for a small area housing the camera or part of the battery or whatever. It seemed with some of them that the thicker portion added to the feel in the hand - it made it easy to hold the phone, while adding something much smaller than a pack of gum to the bulk.

But is it really true that the more expensive phones outsell the cheap/free phones in general? Recently we saw that the i4S was outselling the FreeGS, which is evidence in favor. But I've not really examined the lists of best selling phones in enough detail to know if the expensive ones are outselling the cheapies in all cases.

And it is significant that more people go with a free iPhone than buy any Android phone at any price. That is strong evidence that Free is a very powerful tool, especially when coupled with an otherwise less desirable product.

So do the expensive phones dominate the top 10? Are there notable exceptions like the FreeGS, or are there enough cheapies in the list to conclude that FreePhones are doing as well as SOTA phones?

See my post above. To be an Android best seller, you only need outsell any given other phone, of which there are many. So that for instance, best seller A can sell 1,000 units but still be outsold by cheap phones B, C, D, E, and F, each of which sell only a fraction of that number.

Since there are so many cheap or free Android phones on the market, it wouldn't be surprising if cheap and free made up the bulk of allover sales.
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post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Once again, you should really stop posting about business issues since you clearly don't understand the way it works.

Apple presumably counts it as a sale when shipped. It has nothing to do with when the customer takes delivery - and certainly not when the retailer has paid for them.

Normal terms in retail are 30 days or more after shipment. Last time I did business with Walmart, they insisted on payment 90 days after delivery. Either way, the iPad is almost certainly sold long before the retailer pays Apple for it. Yet another advantage to Apple being so cash-rich. They don't need to rely on payments for today's cash needs.

You should really read my posts in their entirety before presuming I'm mistaken. Per Apple a sale has been counted once "delivery has occurred, the sales price is fixed or determinable, and collection is probable. Product is considered delivered to the customer once it has been shipped and title and risk of loss have been transferred.


Title would not transfer before payment was arranged would it? I'm quite aware of how retail works. I've been on both sides of it for much of my adult working life. What you may consider "typical" doesn't necessarily apply to Apple's terms. Apple seems quite clear on what is required to consider a sale to have occurred.
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post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blitz1 View Post

Can't you read?????

I just said that only Apple sells whilst Android are now filling shelves going from Anchorage to Seoul via Brussels and Johannesburg. No-one buys these stuff. The activation figures are a lie!

i thought you were being sarcastic. My apologies.
post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

Here's my guess:

The component manufacturers are sitting on Apple parts which they have already paid to make, but have not yet been able to sell to Apple. Apple cuts orders. Apple demands discounts and threatens to further cut orders. Desperate component manufacturers comply.

Tim is masterful.

Huh? How can one be paid for something and then have to sell it again?
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post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maecvs View Post

A little off topic I know, but is anyone else having problems with their Safari crashing? Mine started a few weeks ago, and crashes EVERY session I uses my iPad. At least two or three times a session. Getting really tired of this......

Mine crashes on gigantic web sites that don't know how to resize their images to something sane--these are sites that take a long time to load even on a computer over a 15Mbps cable link. I simply avoid those sites on the iPad, but even when I visit them, the iPad 1 can handle it; it just dumps everything else in memory to do it, so not sure what is causing you problems. So the first thing I would try is to close all open web pages except whatever you are visiting.

The second thing I would recommend is reboot your iPad. It normally isn't necessary (it's not running Android, after all), but it helps to dump all other running apps sitting in RAM. I know, it shouldn't be necessary and all, but it does help.

If that still doesn't work, try backing up and restoring your iPad through iTunes. This is Apple's usual go-to procedure for weird problems like this, and sometimes it works. If you contact Apple support, that's the first thing they'll recommend.

If none of the above works, make a genius bar appointment of you live near an Apple Store and ask them to look into it. They can access the crash reports generated when an app fails, and might be able to suggest a solution.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #40 of 47
My poor Freudian eyes almost gave me a heart attack!

Maybe I actually do need a smartphone with a bigger screen?

Macintosh 512Ke.......

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Macintosh 512Ke.......

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