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Warner Bros. giving iTunes redemption codes to unhappy UltraViolet users

post #1 of 44
Thread Starter 
UltraViolet, an initiative by Hollywood studios to distribute digital movies independently of Apple's iTunes, has suffered such a backlash from users that Warner Bros. has started placating users with redemption codes for iTunes instead.

End users trying to access digital versions of BluRay or DVD movies via UltraViolet have been overwhelmingly dissatisfied with the system, which doesn't work natively on Apple's iOS devices. Amazon reviews of recent disc releases have been scathing, with more than half of the hundreds of responses complaining about UltraViolet.

Warner Bros. Flixster app for iOS, used to present UltraViolet movies, has been hit with so many complaints that the company has set up a support website to direct users on how to use the system, frequently resorting to giving away iTunes redemption codes to appease angry users unable to play the content they purchased.

Outside of Flixster, Ultraviolet requires registering a new user account and installing Adobe Flash Player. UltraViolet does not work at all on Apple TV. iTunes App Store reviews of Flixster users complain of long waits, irritating bugs, "too many hoops" to jump through to watch the content, and problems of the UltraViolet content simply not working at all.

UV vs Apple, Disney

UltraViolet is backed by more than 70 members of the Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem consortium, led by Sony Pictures' Mitch Singer. The group includes Adobe, Comcast, HP, Intel, LG, Microsoft, Motorola Mobility, Netflix, Nokia, Panasonic, Philips, Samsung, and Toshiba, along with studios Fox, Paramount, Sony, NBC Universal, Warner and the RIAA.

The consortium hoped to create a DRM alternative to Apple's iTunes video that would enable users to buy playback rights to a movie that could be presented on any participating device, similar to Microsoft's PlaysForSure for music.



Apple and Disney are among the few not supporting the program, but that also means UltraViolet content won't work on all iOS devices or iPods, a limitation that helped kill Microsoft's PlaysForSure and more recently Adobe Flash.

Disney and Apple have floated an alternative open format called Keychest that would enable users to obtain a single key that could be used to unlock digital rights on any system, rather than mandating the file type and technology of the DRM system as UltraViolet hopes to do.

In 2007, Apple began promoting "digital copy," a way for studios to enable DVD or BluRay buyers to access a mobile, digital download of the same movie for playback on their iPods and iOS devices without requiring them to rip the media or defeat its encryption.

The digital copy system also enabled opening the same content to Windows Media users, and some studios' content exclusively provided support for Microsoft's DRM, a problem Keychest sought to alleviate.

Apple has since worked to get studios to support digital streaming movies in iCloud, which is currently limited to providing cloud-based downloads of music and TV programs as the movie studios wait to see whether UltraViolet can offer any competition to the iTunes ecosystem. Studios are hoping that UltraViolet will support physical disc sales even as consumers increasing choose to buy digital downloads or streaming content from Apple, Amazon and Netflix.
post #2 of 44
Quote:
Warner Bros. giving iTunes redemption codes to unhappy UltraViolet users

So Ultraviolet users.

Eventually Apple will have an Open Letter to Studios, petitioning for DRM-free video content. And when one does it, the rest will be forced to follow. Because it's Apple. And it's iTunes.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #3 of 44
ahahhahhahahahahhahah.... when will these companies learn that it's all about the user experience. Crappy experience = crappy product.
post #4 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

UltraViolet, an initiative by Hollywood studios to distribute digital movies independently of Apple's iTunes, has suffered such a backlash from users that Warner Bros. has started placating users with redemption codes for iTunes instead.


Warner distancing itself from the cartel. Angry customers. Hollywood at its finest.
post #5 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by SebaSaint View Post

ahahhahhahahahahhahah.... when will these companies learn that it's all about the user experience. Crappy experience = crappy product.

This, apple success is by combining art with science, it's only been the topic of apples success for years, why haven't the competitors figured that out yet? iOS and first iphone came it it didn't even support MMS or notifications or hell just about nothig was supported,and it was STILL a major success. WHy? Certainly not it's feature set. Because of it's genius design.

When you bring a kid to the store to get a computer for school, she goes "aww that imac is cute" not "this computer has a newer generation mother board with faster front side bus and 20% higher cpu performance for 400 dollars cheaper" That might be what daddy tries to tell the little girl, but he still comes home with the pretty imac

Stereo typed example i know but you get the idea heh.
post #6 of 44
And in related news, McDonald's is sending their angry customers to Burger King...

Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

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Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

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post #7 of 44
Hmpf. The last time the entertainment industry tried to build their own digital media tower of failure, it ended in iTunes Music Store and iPod saving their asses from rampant content piracy.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #8 of 44
Any ideas on how to acquire a code? I am having this exact same frustration with UV and WB DVDs.
post #9 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by edlsoccer View Post

Any ideas on how to acquire a code? I am having this exact same frustration with UV and WB DVDs.

file a complaint at support.ultraviolet.flixster.com.

it is the SD version of the feature but according to my sister she also got the Extras file. since the nephews are using iPads they won't notice the SD quality so she didn't mind that too much.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #10 of 44
I guess this is what happens when a media platform doesnt share Apples priority: user experience.

Too badit could have worked well, and then it would have been another viewing option I wouldnt have minded having.
post #11 of 44
Why exactly are the film companies trying to increase physical disc sales? Is that somehow more profitable than just selling the digital bits you are using to burn the movie to the disc?

1. Make movie
2. Convert to digital format
3. Cost discs
4. Cost of burning digital to disc
5. Cost of packaging
6. Cost of Shipping
7. SELLING MOVIE

or

1. Make movie
2. Convert to digital format
3. SELLING MOVIE

Maybe in an unexpected turn of events, the environmentalist can get all pissed at the Film Co's for trying to increase plastic product waste.
post #12 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

1. Make movie
2. Convert to digital format
3. SELLING MOVIE

1. Make movie.

they're all digital these days already. A pro!

2. Edit, write music, do ADR

3. Sell on NAND Thunderbolt drives with draconian DRM.

3.1. Or just sell on iTunes. As 1080p files. For once.

Even better!

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #13 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by SebaSaint View Post

ahahhahhahahahahhahah.... when will these companies learn that it's all about the user experience. Crappy experience = crappy product.

Apple could learn from this too, since none of it's iTunes Store HD movies will play on any device that's not HDCP compliant, AND they don't bother to tell you that before they rent you a "all sales are final" movie.

Yup, crappy experience = crappy product.
post #14 of 44
This is so fantastic. I didn't complain on Amazon, but I did complain in an email the day I got the Harry Potter part 2 disc that just released. And I got a prompt email from them offering me an iTunes redemption code. It never occurred to me that others would be as upset as I was.

For those don't know what's going on. I bought Harry Potter part 2 and was going to download a digital copy. I found out I had to register with Flixster, download Adobe Air so I could run their digital app. I don't want Adobe Air so I can run yet another app and net another media locker. I was so upset I wrote to them and explained that there are simply too many entities that want us to use their media app. There is already a king media app. It's called iTunes. And I have no interest in using ten different media apps to manage movies I buy. I told them change it, or I'll simply not buy the Blu-ray in the first place. To that they offered a redemption code.

It really does bother me that I am asked to install Adobe Air so I can run yet another app on top of Adobe Air. Screw that. Learn to frick'n program in my native op. And I don't want to look in ten different apps for the movie I want to watch. I want to use iTunes and maybe stream it to my Apple TV. I don't want to have to have all these separate things. I like my eco system.

MacBook Pro | iPad (3rd gen)
Samsung Galaxy Note

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MacBook Pro | iPad (3rd gen)
Samsung Galaxy Note

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post #15 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by dualie View Post

[no] HD movies will play on any device that's not HDCP compliant

That's… kind of how it goes. It should be evident in the phrase "HDCP".

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #16 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Hmpf. The last time the entertainment industry tried to build their own digital media tower of failure, it ended in iTunes Music Store and iPod saving their asses from rampant content piracy.

And Sony was a major player in the music industry's failure in the digital music game. Finally the industry listened to Steve Jobs and iTunes was born.

It's not about the customers or even money. It's about power and they don't want to give it Apple. Even though they have no clue what they're doing and they would make way more money partnering with Apple.
post #17 of 44
Yes the music industry had to accept to future (iTunes) with some reluctance. Movie studios shoud learn the lesson.

Harry Potter is the first super-major title to be encumbered by Ultraviolet. Forgive me for not counting Green Lantern or others (sorry, but not as big).

I wholeheartedly believe, as I wrote WB, the power play will backlash against their studio and product. The internal marketing idea is clear: force those elitist wealthier Apple customers to buy their blu-ray disc copy and then ave to buy another copy fom the iTunes store - paying twice for the same product. Problem with this studio logic is, that's not how this game would play out... Instead, pissed off buyer are likely to turn to illegal torrent downloads. The customer after all already feels ownership as they hold their receipt in hand. Instead of making the right choice, the studios stabbed their customers in hopes the customer would bleed money.

WB and other studios, trust and treat your customers with respect - likely Apple and other quality companies. Don't force the customer to pursue alternative methods to obtain what they happily pay for. Don't insult us. Don't use us.

Do the right thing and embrace all distribution channels - and in the end bring in the rightful profit your product earns. Customers are happy to be honest and legal - don't force them to choose otherwise.
post #18 of 44
My wife was going to buy the super combo pack for Harry Potter, until she noticed the 'Ultraviolet' logo. She then recalled how cranky I was that Green Lantern was saddled with it and I had to use other means to get it to play on my iPad with no internet connection.

She decided to forgo buying the super combo pack and just bought the digital version from iTunes.

So basically WB did not get the sale of the Super Combo Pack, they got 70% of the digital download price. Wonder, in the long run, which they would have preferred?
post #19 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

Why exactly are the film companies trying to increase physical disc sales?

Like the Music industry before them, the movie studio's want to preserve that status quo (sell Discs) at all costs (like most large old businesses) - even if they pay someone to tell them what the future is (which is staring them in the face) they won't accept and embrace it. Content is to be tightly controlled.

And so, just like the music industry, you get this awful attempt at digital delivery in the guise of sustaining Disc sales because they are afraid of cannibalizing disc sales of their own product. Just like the Music industry they will fail and be forced to embrace something closer to what Apple and Disney are proposing.
post #20 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

Why exactly are the film companies trying to increase physical disc sales? Is that somehow more profitable than just selling the digital bits you are using to burn the movie to the disc?

Because the only way to get an HD movie with HD audio is via optical disk, and since sales of Blu-ray are continuing to increase, consumers must want them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

Maybe in an unexpected turn of events, the environmentalist can get all pissed at the Film Co's for trying to increase plastic product waste.

What about the environmental cost in producing the hardware to store the movies, and the electricity required to power these digital download servers.
post #21 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aybara View Post

My wife was going to buy the super combo pack for Harry Potter, until she noticed the 'Ultraviolet' logo. She then recalled how cranky I was that Green Lantern was saddled with it and I had to use other means to get it to play on my iPad with no internet connection.

She decided to forgo buying the super combo pack and just bought the digital version from iTunes.

They seriously need to sort this out. UltraViolet should be a way better solution than buying an iTunes movie.

Of course no DRM at all would be best, but if we are forced to use DRM then UltraViolet is the best solution I've seen... if only they would implement it right!!
post #22 of 44
I've always bought physical disc when buying movies. I have 600 of them. A year ago I started buying from iTunes. I have 20 iTunes movies. I start buying iTunes because I didn't have to rip the movie to get a digital copy and it was easier to find some older classics on iTunes. I've stopped purchasing video content from iTunes because AppleID became a headache over multiple devices and formats.

I have ripped all 600 movies into non-DRM copies. Older iTunes' digital copies often only have stereo audio and poor quality. I can get better audio when I rip the disc. I will never buy any movie under UV because any DRM is not worth having, even iTunes fair-use, although it is the best I've seen so far. My beef with iTunes is their DRM content is tied to an AppleID and Apple won't let me merge the different IDs into one.

So I believe ripping a physical disc is way better because you get the video and audio quality of the disc. The only problem was the time it takes getting a large movie library ripped, but once it's done, adding new purchases are no big deal.

My point is any DRM, and especially UltraViolet, will never really work for the ardent digital movie owner. I'm sure much more music was sold at the iTMS after the store went DRM free than before. The companies need to trust their customers. Sure there will always be those who steal, but copy protection didn't work on DVDs when the studios tried to shove it down our throats and it's not going to work in digital world either.

Just my 2 cents!
post #23 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

What about the environmental cost in producing the hardware to store the movies, and the electricity required to power these digital download servers.

You're kidding, right? This is most certainly a fraction of the cost of the electricity required to manufacture, store, ship, and sell (physical shop front or warehouse for mail order purchase) a physical disk.
post #24 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by sfoalex View Post

This is so fantastic. I didn't complain on Amazon, but I did complain in an email the day I got the Harry Potter part 2 disc that just released. And I got a prompt email from them offering me an iTunes redemption code. It never occurred to me that others would be as upset as I was. ...

sfoalex - where did you email? I sent an email to WB on the day I bought the combo pack as well, and haven't heard anything. Thanks!
post #25 of 44
WHAT A MESS!!!!

Having just bought a LED TV & and Apple TV, I was finally motivated to get my iTunes videos organized... It is wonderful to use and I'm slowly but surely converting everything. The crappy part is converting to Apple TVs 720 limitation and not being/wanting to delete 1080p files, knowing they'll be needed in the future.

But studios just don't friggin get it. If I can't get my movie easily online for a fair price in HD - the eyes wander to a place called The Pirate Bay.

F*ck physical discs! I understand the quality/size is an issue with downloads but having all this content on a small hard drive was the future 10 years ago! There is no excuse for this mess other than people who JUST.DONT.GET.IT.

If studios didn't have their heads up their collective asses, I bet we'd be so much further along in TECH as well as content as the volume would dictate the drive forward in hardware.

Ugh. Ugh. Ugh.
post #26 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljocampo View Post

So I believe ripping a physical disc is way better because you get the video and audio quality of the disc. The only problem was the time it takes getting a large movie library ripped, but once it's done, adding new purchases are no big deal.

My point is any DRM, and especially UltraViolet, will never really work for the ardent digital movie owner.

I agree ripping a physical disc is the best solution if you're able to do that. It's what I do.

That said, the idea of UltraViolet is the best solution if we are forced to have DRM.

In theory once you buy an UltraViolet movie you own a licence to that movie in perpetuity. From companies that support UltraViolet (which is basically everyone except Apple) you are then able to stream or download an offline copy of that movie.

The problem is that the implementation sucks at the moment. There is only one service that you can view your movie from and it seems like that application doesn't support downloading an offline copy.

The best outcome for Apple's customers (apart from no DRM at all) would actually be if Apple supported UltraViolet. Unfortunately at the moment Apple and the studios seem more focused on their own power struggle than the consumers.
post #27 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

I agree ripping a physical disc is the best solution if you're able to do that. It's what I do.

That said, the idea of UltraViolet is the best solution if we are forced to have DRM.

In theory once you buy an UltraViolet movie you own a licence to that movie in perpetuity. From companies that support UltraViolet (which is basically everyone except Apple) you are then able to stream or download an offline copy of that movie.

The problem is that the implementation sucks at the moment. There is only one service that you can view your movie from and it seems like that application doesn't support downloading an offline copy.

The best outcome for Apple's customers (apart from no DRM at all) would actually be if Apple supported UltraViolet. Unfortunately at the moment Apple and the studios seem more focused on their own power struggle than the consumers.

Maybe it's a power struggle. I don't want to play though. I have not found one DVD that I purchased that a ripping tool couldn't rip. I have several software tools to rip DVDs and if you know how to use them properly they can rip anything the Studios can get away with, even the 99 title copy protection trick is easily defeated if you know how. DRM, such as UltraViolet, is only meant to make an end-run around fair-use laws, not to defeat piracy. The piracy myth doesn't hold water anymore. As long as there is DRM, there will be a tool to defeat it. I buy all my software and entertainment content legally and why should I be denied easy access to it. To me that falls under mass punishment.

".... licence to that movie in perpetuity ..."

Is that like MS' Play-for-Sure? I have a basement full of gadgets and software content with propriety formats that have been abandoned.

"That said, the idea of UltraViolet is the best solution if we are forced to have DRM."

I think this has a fundamental flaw in achieving individual consumer rights. If you appease those who wish to control you, you will always be under control. It's much better to not to accept these terms in the first place.
post #28 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

Warner distancing itself from the cartel. Angry customers. Hollywood at its finest.

Was that supposed to be "utraviolent" or "ultraviolated"? What? Ultraviolated customers turning ultraviolent!
post #29 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Because the only way to get an HD movie with HD audio is via optical disk, and since sales of Blu-ray are continuing to increase, consumers must want them.

The sales of Blu Rays are going up for a three reasons

1. They have raised the price of a regular DVD significantly and lowered the price of a Blu Ray in an effort to get you to buy the blu ray

2. They have stopped giving us all the extras we used to get on dvd and are making them available only on blu ray format

3. They won't sell their HD versions on iTunes in a dumb effort to keep us from buying there
post #30 of 44
Well, I have 4 ultraviolet movies, both Harry Potters, Green Lantern, and Horrible Bosses.
The last one I needed a way to use some type of parental controls, hide the movie, or delete it from my flixster account. I have sent like 6 e-mails and they don't know how to remove it or there is nothing in the flixster collections pc software or flixster app to change anything once you added it to your account. I finally got them to allow me to redownload the digital copies and I opened up another account with a different e-mail so I could completely start over with this stuff. I am a tech guy and this has been frustrating but most folks will not put up with what I did.

My ipad kept getting low memory error messages when I tried playing Harry Potter DHpt2, so I e-mailed their tech support and I did get an itunes digital copy code.
I think the service is not ready for prime time.

I have used the WB DCM mobile app Warner provided when some of their movies had only a windows media digital copy code and no itunes. When I upgraded my iphone 3gs to a 4S and I resynced the app it now crashes which is probably due to a drm issue. I e-mailed tech support and get no response now. My guess is Warner has moved on from that and is only going to support ultraviolet.
post #31 of 44
I've been venting on forums and other media for years about how the media companies have made a mess of things with these multiple formats and DRM's. They've ruined BD for me because of all the loading time and new codecs my player has to download and what-nots. there needs to be one format for everyone to be able to play on any device. Not what we have now.

Furthermore, all this Handbrake talk is sort of pointless for Mac users now that most movies are on BD, and Apple does not support BD.

I'm one of those people that prefer physical media over Digital. and that's mainly for security, special features and commentaries. Hard drives fail. Server farms can fail...and then what do you have? Nothing. Granted with iTunes they store all your purchases for re-download, that is an advantage, but currently they only offer 720p and no special features and commentaries, one of the main reasons why I buy physical media.

Speaking of lack of Special features and commentaries...has anyone else noticed that when you get a physical disc from Netflix, they only give you the "rental copy" with nothing but the movie???

then there's the frustration that you can't get a digital download of movies you already own. So now you're going to have to re-purchase all your non-digital movies for an extra fee. I'm of a generation such that I've owned VHS, DVD, BD and now digital movies. I've had to re-purchase pretty much my entire library (at the time) every time they change formats, and i'm getting pretty tired of it. Why can't we learn from the music industry and just allow iTunes to rip movies legally if the disk is in DVD format (just like music CDs). Since Apple doesn't support BD I don't see the issue with just SD movies. They look great on my BD player when unconverted and I only use digital media for travel anyway....

well, just my 2 cents of bitching and moaning, just like 50% of the posts on here. I think we're all just frustrated with power struggle. Apple had a solution a simple access code. Why the big industry thought that wasn't adequate enough is beyond me.
post #32 of 44
Adobe
Comcast
HP
Intel
LG
Microsoft
Motorola Mobility
Netflix
Nokia
Panasonic
Philips
Samsung
Toshiba
Fox
Paramount
Sony
NBC Universal
Warner
RIAA

Vs

Apple
Disney

Not exactly a fair fight but at least they can share the disappointment when Apple sees this opposing format running for the hills. The customers pay the wages, you have to keep them happy.
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evilution View Post

Adobe
Comcast
HP
Intel
LG
Microsoft
Motorola Mobility
Netflix
Nokia
Panasonic
Philips
Samsung
Toshiba
Fox
Paramount
Sony
NBC Universal
Warner
RIAA

Vs

Apple
Disney

Not exactly a fair fight but at least they can share the disappointment when Apple sees this opposing format running for the hills. The customers pay the wages, you have to keep them happy.

Here's a good website that illustrates just how much media is controlled by just 7 companies...click on the "+" to see what each controls. It's quite shocking how much of what we see, hear and read is controlled by just a few Mega Corps.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontl...s/cool/giants/
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

file a complaint at support.ultraviolet.flixster.com.

it is the SD version of the feature but according to my sister she also got the Extras file. since the nephews are using iPads they won't notice the SD quality so she didn't mind that too much.

I complained on the site listed above and was emailed an iTunes code right away. I am so happy! I am deleting all the ultraviolet and flitter junk from my devices.
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticalOS View Post

This, apple success is by combining art with science, it's only been the topic of apples success for years, why haven't the competitors figured that out yet? iOS and first iphone came it it didn't even support MMS or notifications or hell just about nothig was supported,and it was STILL a major success. WHy? Certainly not it's feature set. Because of it's genius design.

When you bring a kid to the store to get a computer for school, she goes "aww that imac is cute" not "this computer has a newer generation mother board with faster front side bus and 20% higher cpu performance for 400 dollars cheaper" That might be what daddy tries to tell the little girl, but he still comes home with the pretty imac

Stereo typed example i know but you get the idea heh.

But in general a flawed perception that raw power equals win. An iPad 2 is clocked 100MHz slower than the Motorola Xoom tablet and half the memory, and yet it carries 3x the 3D game performance and boasts a much better battery life.

Most of these companies think it's about throwing features at it, where as Apple knows it's about making good on your promises. They optimize everything to the max, Motorola on the other hand failed with Xoom because they just threw hardware specs at the standard Android OS & then spent the rest on commercials that grossly exaggerate the tablet's capabilities.

Apple also gets it's about simplicity and stability. People these days have no tolerance for devices or services that are clunky & complicated. We want technology to simplify our lives, not make it more complicated.
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by SebaSaint View Post

ahahhahhahahahahhahah.... when will these companies learn that it's all about the user experience. Crappy experience = crappy product.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

That's… kind of how it goes. It should be evident in the phrase "HDCP".


Are you thick? First, you misquoted me, and second there are LOTS of HD devices that are not HDCP compliant and NO Apple's HD movies will NOT play on them. Apple DOES NOT issue a warning that their movies REQUIRE compliance. So unless you already know your device complies AND you know that Apple's movie require compliance, you risk renting a movie for which you can't get a refund, according to Apple's terms of service.
post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by dualie View Post

there are LOTS of HD devices that are not HDCP compliant and NO Apple's HD movies will NOT play on them.

Yes. Which is the point I'm making. It makes sense that devices without High Definition Copy Protection will not be able to play High Definition movies that are Copy Protected.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by j1h15233 View Post

The sales of Blu Rays are going up for a three reasons

1. They have raised the price of a regular DVD significantly and lowered the price of a Blu Ray in an effort to get you to buy the blu ray

2. They have stopped giving us all the extras we used to get on dvd and are making them available only on blu ray format

3. They won't sell their HD versions on iTunes in a dumb effort to keep us from buying there

4. Buying from iTunes is for schmucks
Household: MacBook, iPad 16gb wifi, iPad 64gb wifi, iPad Mini 32gb, coming iPhone 5S, iPhone 4S 32gb, iPhone 32gb, iPod Touch 4th gen x1, iPod nano 16gb gen 5 x2, iPod nano gen 3 8gb, iPod classic...
Reply
Household: MacBook, iPad 16gb wifi, iPad 64gb wifi, iPad Mini 32gb, coming iPhone 5S, iPhone 4S 32gb, iPhone 32gb, iPod Touch 4th gen x1, iPod nano 16gb gen 5 x2, iPod nano gen 3 8gb, iPod classic...
Reply
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycomiko View Post

4. Buying from iTunes is for schmucks

And your detailed, unbiased analysis of this is?

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

You're kidding, right? This is most certainly a fraction of the cost of the electricity required to manufacture, store, ship, and sell (physical shop front or warehouse for mail order purchase) a physical disk.

Are you really sure about this? You do realise these servers (and all connected network services) need power constantly to keep them going? You do realise this servers have an environment cost in their production (as does all the connected network devices)
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AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › Warner Bros. giving iTunes redemption codes to unhappy UltraViolet users