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Study finds Apple ecosystem helps iPhone lead industry in user retention

post #1 of 60
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A new study finds that iPhone owners are the most loyal smartphone users, and cites customers' personal investments in Apple's ecosystem as driving an over 80% retention rate for the device.

A report released on Thursday by research firm GfK shows that 84% of current iPhone owners plan to purchase another Apple handset when they replace their cellphone, with many smartphone users saying the ecosystem of a mobile OS is a determining factor when upgrading, according to Reuters.

The study conducted over 4,500 interviews of smartphone owners in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, China, the U.S. and Japan, finding that the iPhone had the highest retention of customers, followed by devices running Google's Android OS and RIM's BlackBerry, with 60% and 48% respectively.

GfK analyst Ryan Garner notes that an average 63% of respondents plan to replace their current device with one running the same OS, lowering the possibility of quick market swing. Subsequently, manufacturers are jockeying for position as customer loyalty becomes ever more crucial in a mobile market that is quickly being saturated.

The analyst goes on to say that the more services and features a customer uses in a particular mobile OS environment, the more entrenched the user becomes. Nearly one in five consumers who own both an iPad and iPhone believe that switching to another OS would be more difficult than changing bank accounts or gas or electricity providers.

"Those who are satisfied with their current set-up will be difficult to tempt to a new platform and the more services they use, the greater a consumers loyalty to a brand, Garner said.

With over 70% of consumers saying features and seamless access to content are major factors in staying with their current mobile OS, the push for a value-added ecosystem is becoming a greater priority for the industry.

Apple's iCloud and iTunes are examples of creating an experience that customers not only enjoy, but cite as a reason to stay with the iOS platform due to financial and personal investments.



The study found that respondents cited three main arguments regarding user experience as barriers to switching devices; 33% being too invested in apps and current phone setup to change, 29% claiming that learning how to operate a new device is a detriment and 28% sees moving digital content from one smartphone to another as too much of a hassle.

"The smartphone providers that create harmonious user experiences will be able to increase consumer loyalty, as consumers find it more trouble than its worth to switch their digital life on their smartphone as well as increasingly on tablets too," Garner said. "In a competitive market, brands that invest in user experience will yield great results."



However, device simplicity and integration with a digital world of content are not the only factors in choosing to stay with a device. Cross-platform access to already purchased media or apps is also seen as a driving force for some users.

Almost three quarters (72%) of smartphone owners feel that it is important to access to their digital libraries across multiple platforms, with the figure jumping to 80% for users who also own tablets and PCs. In this case, Apple's walled-in iTunes system becomes a negative aspect to the overall Apple environment as all apps and much of the media purchased through the service can only be used on iOS devices.

China, seen by many as the most important developing mobile market for Apple, places the greatest importance on cross-platform access with 92% of respondents emphasizing the need for media to be compatible across all devices.

Despite Apple's "walled garden," an AppleInsider report suggests there is high demand for the iPhone in China, with the newest iPhone 4S reportedly set to go on sale within two weeks after recently being approved for sale.

Garner notes the sum of the findings, from user experience to cross-platform media access, points to success for the manufacturer or OS developer that can most quickly attract users with an innovative and easy to use mobile platform.

"Those in dominant market positions, who create amazing user experiences, are potentially in the strongest position, and will be the most difficult to challenge in terms of capturing market share, Garner said.
post #2 of 60
Yea, it's both good and bad.
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
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Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
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post #3 of 60
My best advice to friends is, "never become entrenched". Once you start choosing products and services based solely on the brand name, you are done. Always judge each individually on its own merit. The more expensive option will always appear simple, but by no means does that make it the best.
post #4 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

My best advice to friends is, "never become entrenched". Once you start choosing products and services based solely on the brand name, you are done. Always judge each individually on its own merit. The more expensive option will always appear simple, but by no means does that make it the best.

Agreed. Many people buy Android based on the Google name, and haven’t done the thorough research to realize how much they are giving up compared to iOS. A ‘sort-of iPhone-alike” is still an awesome gadget compared to what existed pre-iPhone; yet I see Android users fighting their phones to get simple tasks done, and running out of battery in the process, and I can only hope that they get some comfort from the Google brand name (and “open” buzzword that mainly helps the carriers/handset makers). Cheap is not always the best... and although Android exists to sell you to advertisers, Android handsets still aren’t even cheap! The handsets start at free (short-sighted gimmick) just like the iPhone does, and then they get abandoned to make you buy the next one. And then you buy the next one because the old one isn’t good enough... unlike Apple users who come back to Apple because their last experience WAS so good!

Neither platform needs to lock you in: just choose free or ad-supported or at least cheap apps. If you spend a lot on paid apps—even on Android—then yes, that’s an unavoidable lock-in of sorts: different OS’s do not run the same native apps, so you’d have to re-buy apps when you switch to iOS (or vice versa). Music is no lock-in: Apple doesn’t use DRM, and iTunes/iOS support non-iTunes music just fine. Ditto for non-Apple eBooks. Movies? Yes, from any source, they’re sadly still DRM-burdened most of the time.

The “lock-in” isn’t extra security measures or something; it’s that Apple’s whole system works so well together you don’t want to settle for some other mess!
post #5 of 60
They had to do a study to figure out the obvious?
post #6 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unkown Blogger View Post

They had to do a study to figure out the obvious?

Well, actually, they had a study first to see if they were going to study it.
na na na na na...
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na na na na na...
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post #7 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unkown Blogger View Post

They had to do a study to figure out the obvious?

I was about to say no sh*t Sherlock, but you put it better.
Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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post #8 of 60
The study should go one further. How many iPhone users buy more apple products because of the iPhone. I'm living proof-
An iPhone influenced me to switch everything work and home to apple. The only apple product I had before that was my 3rd gen nano for my then newborn daughters room. $199 cost me $6,000ish (too scared to add it up).

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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
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post #9 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

Agreed. Many people buy Android based on the Google name...

Really? You think they have that kind of brand recognition? Hmm. maybe

I have an iPad2, but didn't choose it because of who made it or for the ecosystem. It was simply the best there was. My other gadgets (phone, internet TV box, laptop) aren't made by Apple, but for me they are the best or were at the time I bought them. It's not inconvenient to have products made by different companies even though most would have us believe otherwise. It would be very hard for one company to be the best in every product category. Apple is very good at what they do and that's why I bought their tablet.
post #10 of 60
Owning an iPod since 2003 and staying with OSX and Macs has prevented any migration problems with any of my music. iTunes transfers and Apple migrations from Mac to Mac have made it a smooth 8 years. New iPhone (I'm on my third) just means syncing one last time on one and then syncing the new one. Done. Nothings has to be re-ripped, re-encoded, etc. It just works.
post #11 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

My best advice to friends is, "never become entrenched". Once you start choosing products and services based solely on the brand name, you are done. Always judge each individually on its own merit. The more expensive option will always appear simple, but by no means does that make it the best.

That's probably because you are a techie/nerd who loves complexity and the challenges of getting a fragmented and/or bug ridden OSs like Android and/or Windows to work.

However, the vast majority of users are not techies/nerds and we just want our devices to "just work" simply and intuitively, with as easy a learning curve as possible. Every user satisfaction survey shows that Apple Macs and iOS devices always score by far the highest. This is why Apple users are so loyal and why Macs and iOS devices are gaining market share and why Apple enjoys the "Halo Effect".

User are also concerned about security. Apple OS and iOS are far more secure than Windows and Android. This is especially important for enterprises, which is one of the reasons the iPhone has gained 45% (and rapidly growing) market share and the iPad has gained 96% and why over 90% of Fortune 500 are trialing or deploying iOS devices.

Furthermore research shows that Apple Mac users are far more productive than Windows users. This is why Forresters, who in the past have always advised IT departments to avoid Macs, have recently done a 180% about turn, and now advise corporations to support Macs.

Of course the fact that Apple has the biggest, smoothes working content ecosystem adds greatly to user satisfaction and Apple's renowned "stickiness".

However, it is not just with entertainment content where Apple excels. In the enterprise world iOS has far more business Apps than any other mobile OS, with far more developers producing far more Apps.
post #12 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Secular Investor View Post

That's probably because you are a techie/nerd who loves complexity and the challenges of getting a fragmented and/or bug ridden OSs like Android and/or Windows to work.

However, the vast majority of users are not techies/nerds and we just want our devices to "just work" simply and intuitively, with as easy a learning curve as possible.

When people say this it makes it sound like Apple users are not technically proficient. I can get plenty nerdy on OSX thankyouverymuch. I'll take a nice BASH shell over a CMD prompt any day -- a DOS shell is not nerdy, it's weaksauce.

/20 year IT tech.
post #13 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

My best advice to friends is, "never become entrenched". Once you start choosing products and services based solely on the brand name, you are done. Always judge each individually on its own merit. The more expensive option will always appear simple, but by no means does that make it the best.

That's why you tell Windows users to try a Mac for a week. They'd be so surprised to not be removing viruses and spy-ware all week and actually get work done. And soon enough they'd be forgetting about the OS and not be bothered to be reminded they are currently connected to their own wifi network and to update now and now.
post #14 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Secular Investor View Post

That's probably because you are a techie/nerd who loves complexity...

I was a loyal Apple fan and customer from 1994-2007 or so. I never found any particular simplicity with any of their products in comparison to others. OSX and ipod touch presented just as many challenges. The design is cleaner, however and industrial design is sleeker. They make great products, but I have never felt compelled to buy all products from them. Making a purchasing decision based on the company offering it and before it is released is a foreign concept. Never had any issue moving music... pretty simple these days, provided it isn't DRM'd to a particular vendor.
post #15 of 60
Quote:
Apple's walled-in iTunes system becomes a negative aspect to the overall Apple environment as all apps and much of the media purchased through the service can only be used on iOS devices.

And this was a problem when Apple turned the iPod and iTunes Music Store into the biggest music business?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #16 of 60
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Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

That's why you tell Windows users to try a Mac for a week. They'd be so surprised to not be removing viruses and spy-ware all week and actually get work done. And soon enough they'd be forgetting about the OS and not be bothered to be reminded they are currently connected to their own wifi network and to update now and now.

I've got imac that's a few years old. Whether I use it or a pc in the other room, I don't really think about the OS. I like the mighty mouse scrolling better though.

I recommended an imac and later an ipad to my mother in law. She loves them.

I used to warn PC users about viruses too. Just like with Macs, you have to think before you click.
post #17 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

I was a loyal Apple fan and customer from 1994-2007 or so. I never found any particular simplicity with any of their products in comparison to others. OSX and ipod touch presented just as many challenges. The design is cleaner, however and industrial design is sleeker. They make great products, but I have never felt compelled to buy all products from them. Making a purchasing decision based on the company offering it and before it is released is a foreign concept. Never had any issue moving music... pretty simple these days, provided it isn't DRM'd to a particular vendor.

You're missing the point of the article, which is about eco systems, not individual products or services by themselves. Some Apple products may not be better at what another competitor does with their product in it's class, but working together with other Apple made devices and services makes it that much more and for many loyal Apple customers, wins over the competition. Just consider the Mac, iOS, and Apple TV and how well all the hardware communicates with one another through services like iCloud and iTunes, and technologies like AirPlay and thats what gives a brand name like Apple such strong weight. It's just a blast to sit down in the living room and simply load up a video on your iPhone and with a couple of taps, have it stream to your home theater setup. No one else offers simplicity and elegance to that degree.
post #18 of 60
Lots of extreme Apple fans here . Although I love my new iPhone and iCloud, I still use Firefox because of its cross-platform syncing capabilities. I can use the same bookmarks at home and at work that way. I would love to see Safari and Firefox to be able to sync each other's bookmarks.
post #19 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsa View Post

Lots of extreme Apple fans here . Although I love my new iPhone and iCloud, I still use Firefox because of its cross-platform syncing capabilities. I can use the same bookmarks at home and at work that way. I would love to see Safari and Firefox to be able to sync each other's bookmarks.

There are several options. One is simply using Safari at work with iCloud connected. Another is using tool to sync your bookmarks between Mac Safari and Firefox bookmarks.

Can't you also do this with Chrome? I wonder why people choose the slower FF over Chrome when both have adequate extensions.

There are plenty of services that will save to a cloud service so you can have a disparate browser at work. Here's one: http://download.xmarks.com/download/all

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post #20 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsa View Post

Lots of extreme Apple fans here . Although I love my new iPhone and iCloud, I still use Firefox because of its cross-platform syncing capabilities. I can use the same bookmarks at home and at work that way. I would love to see Safari and Firefox to be able to sync each other's bookmarks.

i don't know and i want to ask can't you just sync iCloud bookmarks between Mac's & PC's?

my way or the highway...

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my way or the highway...

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post #21 of 60
Quote:
Cross-platform access to already purchased media or apps is also seen as a driving force for some users.

There is one interesting corollary of the studies main finding (that investment in an ecosystem is a barrier to switching). This is that if one has a low investment, then switching is easier.

What is interesting about this, is that Android users are notorious for not buying apps but rather getting free ad-supported apps. Now, since iTunes will easily slurp up most any purchased music and provides apps to popular streaming services, there is really very little pain in switching FROM Android to iOS.

Google loves the idea that Android apps developers live off of advertising for the revenue it brings them, but perhaps they have shot themselves in the foot here.
post #22 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icaras View Post

You're missing the point of the article, which is about eco systems, not individual products or services by themselves.

My original statement was, 'never become entrenched' which led to further discussion. Buying into an ecosystem carries inherent risk, the kind that large organizations take steps to avoid. Consumers are rarely in a position to secure their investment and are at the mercy of the vendor. The more you buy in, the worse your position is, the better the 'elegant solutions' look.

I admit apple offers elegant solutions, but what drives me away is the all-or-nothing approach with inflated cost. It's the little things, like not being able to have a legitimate google voice experience on the iphone and inability to buy media/apps on the open market. It drives their bottom line, which is great for them, but not for me. So yes, it's elegant, but not that elegant. Not being entrenched, I can see that, but can still buy in at any time.

It's common to hear that Apple serves the masses rather than the techie minority, yet only 1 in 4 smartphone buyers are choosing iphones, according to the last quarterly report. Their strong ecosystem is doing well, while the 'weaker ecosystem' is luring three times as many smartphone buyers. Tablets are a different story of course, but by this time next year... I'll venture a guess that iPads will account for 1 in 4 sales at that time as well.

I agree, the apple ecosystem helps them attract and retain buyers, but doesn't explain why Android has lured so many more in the last year. In the end, I think Apple will be happy with 20% of the pc, tablet and phone markets earning record profit from hardware, apps and subscriptions. Doing so with minimal churn will be even better.
post #23 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutykamu View Post

i don't know and i want to ask can't you just sync iCloud bookmarks between Mac's & PC's?

I guess you can but at work I am not allowed to install anything. Firefox is supplied by default because 50% of the people like it better than IE.
post #24 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

My original statement was, 'never become entrenched' which led to further discussion. Buying into an ecosystem carries inherent risk, the kind that large organizations take steps to avoid. Consumers are rarely in a position to secure their investment and are at the mercy of the vendor. The more you buy in, the worse your position is, the better the 'elegant solutions' look.

I admit apple offers elegant solutions, but what drives me away is the all-or-nothing approach with inflated cost. It's the little things, like not being able to have a legitimate google voice experience on the iphone and inability to buy media/apps on the open market. It drives their bottom line, which is great for them, but not for me. So yes, it's elegant, but not that elegant. Not being entrenched, I can see that, but can still buy in at any time.

I got to your "inability to buy media/apps on the open market" and realised you don't have a clue what you talk of. An an example, 80% of my music comes from non-iTMS sources, and 100% of my video. I do note that you included"apps" in the statement but suggests your contribution to this discussion is dishonest. Not being entrenched suggests to me that you have not entered this market and are here to "pump your bilges". I trust your sense of personal complacency was suitably propitiated.

Cheers
post #25 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

.

It's common to hear that Apple serves the masses rather than the techie minority, yet only 1 in 4 smartphone buyers are choosing iphones, according to the last quarterly report................Tablets are a different story of course, but by this time next year... I'll venture a guess that iPads will account for 1 in 4 sales at that time as well.

I agree, the apple ecosystem helps them attract and retain buyers, but doesn't explain why Android has lured so many more in the last year. In the end, I think Apple will be happy with 20% of the pc, tablet and phone markets earning record profit from hardware, apps and subscriptions. Doing so with minimal churn will be even better.

There are a number of reasons why the iPhone's market share has not grown as quickly as Android's

1) Android has been available from just about every carrier in the world, whereas iPhones have been available from only a fraction of the world's carriers. One of the reasons for this is that Apple has imposed its own terms which many carriers have tried to resist, including that carriers may not add their "bloatware" on top of the iPhone's UI. The result is beneficial for the user because it gives a much cleaner, easier to use and far more consistent user experience, whereas Android is much more fragmented. Sooner or later carriers have to cave in to Apple's terms because Apple users are much more affluent, browse the internet far and are much more profitable for carriers even though they have to subsidise iPhones.

This Android advantage of greater number of carriers is being rapidly eroded as more and more carriers sell iPhones. Apple will continue to grow its market share of carriers, which Android cannot do. For example last year only one US carrier offered iPhones, now three of the top carriers do, after Verison capitulated and begged to be allowed to sell iPhones on Apple's terms and Sprint agreed to find $20 billion to subsidise iPhones.

The iPad has not suffered the disadvantage of the fewer number of sales points than Android. This is one of the reasons that on a level playing field the iPad has over 70% overall market share and the iPad has a 6:1 sales advantage over all the combined Android tablets.

2) Another advantage Android has had is that there are a great number of Android OEMs, offering a huge range of smartphones at different price points, whereas the iPhone has been a premium product earning the widest margins in the industry. Apple earns over half the total profits of the entire mobile industry even though according to Gartner the iPhone only has less than 4% market shares of mobile phone unit sales. Another problem Apple has had has been that they were unable to keep up with demand.

However, Android's cheaper phone advantage has been eradicated at a stroke by Apple's carriers offering the 3GS for free or 99 cents deposit and the iPhone 4 at less than $100. The big advantage that Apple has is that the latest versions of iOS are backward compatible, something which Android cannot do.

This means that iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4 buyers can now have a premium product with the same iOS 5 software as the top of the line iPhone 4S except they cannot have Siri. So users can now buy a Premium Apple brand and Premium user experience with best content eco-system at the same price or far cheaper than even the lower bargain range of Androids.

This is a brilliant marketing move by Apple and the carriers are reporting a surge in sales of the 3GS and 4 as well as record sales of the 4S. One US carrier has reported that 55% of all smartphones that they are selling are now iPhones.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-1...tml?cmpid=yhoo
post #26 of 60
All I'll say is "damn straight".
Was going to get a Nokia Lumia 800 buuuut... yeah. Apple email, Apple calendar, iOS apps, iTunes full of crap on both my macs. I'm pretty well locked in :b


Though if windows phone 7 supports CalDAV I'll be in like a shot.

... at night.

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post #27 of 60
I've been experimenting using Siri to find and play music from iTunes Match on iCloud.

After a few false starts, it works quite well (though, in the US, Siri seems to understand Castillian Spanish better than Mexican Spanish).

Long story, short!


I predict that Apple will make Siri available on every device that can support it ASAP!


Why?

Let me illustrate:

"Siri play something by 'Sheena Melwani"

Siri: "Looking for 'Sheena Melwani'..."

Siri: "You don't have anything by 'Sheena Melwani' in your music.


----> This is where the dialog ends ... In the present beta.


Here's the obvious continuation of the above conversation:

Siri: "I found 2 Albums and 21 songs by 'Sheena Melwani' in the iTunes Music Store. Would you like to preview them?"

...

Why? I'll tell you why... Because Siri can buy things for you!


Edit: Kinda makes you want Siri on your TV too...
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
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post #28 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I've been experimenting using Siri to find and play music from iTunes Match on iCloud.

After a few false starts, it works quite well (though, in the US, Siri seems to understand Castillian Spanish better than Mexican Spanish).

Long story, short!


I predict that Apple will make Siri available on every device that can support it ASAP!


Why?

Let me illustrate:

"Siri play something by 'Sheena Melwani"

Siri: "Looking for 'Sheena Melwani'..."

Siri: "You don't have anything by 'Sheena Melwani' in your music.


----> This is where the dialog ends ... In the present beta.


Here's the obvious continuation of the above conversation:

Siri: "I found 2 Albums and 21 songs by 'Sheena Melwani' in the iTunes Music Store. Would you like to preview them?"

...

Why? I'll tell you why... Because Siri can buy things for you!


Edit: Kinda makes you want Siri on your TV too...

haha… good one. you have good imagination… now imagine just by saying "Siri order me a 12inch tuna pizza from Papa John's and ask them to deliver it to my home/office"…

my way or the highway...

Macbook Pro i7 13" with intel SSD 320 series and 8GB RAM, iPhone 5, iPad 3 (Retina)

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my way or the highway...

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post #29 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutykamu View Post

haha good one. you have good imagination now imagine just by saying "Siri order me a 12inch tuna pizza from Papa John's and ask them to deliver it to my home/office"

If Apple can get the right APIs for apps in iOS then that might not be too far off.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #30 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icaras View Post

You're missing the point of the article, which is about eco systems, not individual products or services by themselves. Some Apple products may not be better at what another competitor does with their product in it's class, but working together with other Apple made devices and services makes it that much more and for many loyal Apple customers, wins over the competition. Just consider the Mac, iOS, and Apple TV and how well all the hardware communicates with one another through services like iCloud and iTunes, and technologies like AirPlay and thats what gives a brand name like Apple such strong weight. It's just a blast to sit down in the living room and simply load up a video on your iPhone and with a couple of taps, have it stream to your home theater setup. No one else offers simplicity and elegance to that degree.

That's true- Apple TV sucks compared to any other set top box. But if you have a Mac and/or lots of iTunes music/movies/shows, photostream, and an airplay iOS device, theres no debate.

Ahh... The ecosystem... I'm so locked in, apple better keep it up.

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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
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Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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post #31 of 60
Ecosystem and Loyalty certainly make for a very complex symmetry.
post #32 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by minicapt View Post

I got to your "inability to buy media/apps on the open market" and realised you don't have a clue what you talk of. An an example, 80% of my music comes from non-iTMS sources, and 100% of my video.

Maybe I'm too far out of the loop, but didn't think there were alternatives to the app store for buying media from the device. I realize you can shoehorn music and movies, that's true.
post #33 of 60
Quote:
Almost three quarters (72%) of smartphone owners feel that it is important to access to their digital libraries across multiple platforms, with the figure jumping to 80% for users who also own tablets and PCs. In this case, Apple's walled-in iTunes system becomes a negative aspect to the overall Apple environment as all apps and much of the media purchased through the service can only be used on iOS devices.

China, seen by many as the most important developing mobile market for Apple, places the greatest importance on cross-platform access with 92% of respondents emphasizing the need for media to be compatible across all devices.

Despite Apple's "walled garden," an AppleInsider report suggests there is high demand for the iPhone in China, with the newest iPhone 4S reportedly set to go on sale within two weeks after recently being approved for sale.

Garner notes the sum of the findings, from user experience to cross-platform media access, points to success for the manufacturer or OS developer that can most quickly attract users with an innovative and easy to use mobile platform.

Personally my media and content work across everything I have, from my iMac to my iPad and iPhone right over to my AppleTV. I can come home find a movie on my iPad, walk upstairs and hit one button to have it jump to my 70" TV, or hit that same button and walk down stairs and lay in bed and do the same to the TV there. I take photos that appear on my TV or my computer or iPad, I work on documents and they are updated across all my devices. I turn a page in a book and that same page is waiting on any device I would read it on. Now that is seamless. Could always wish for more but viruses and Trojans are not going to be a part of that list.
post #34 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Secular Investor View Post

There are a number of reasons why the iPhone's market share has not grown as quickly as Android's

1) Android has been available from just about every carrier in the world, whereas iPhones have been available from only a fraction of the world's carriers.

2) Another advantage Android has had is that there are a great number of Android OEMs,

However, Android's cheaper phone advantage has been eradicated at a stroke by Apple's carriers offering the 3GS for free or 99 cents deposit and the iPhone 4 at less than $100. The big advantage that Apple has is that the latest versions of iOS are backward compatible, something which Android cannot do.

This means that iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4 buyers can now have a premium product with the same iOS 5 software as the top of the line iPhone 4S except they cannot have Siri. So users can now buy a Premium Apple brand and Premium user experience with best content eco-system at the same price or far cheaper than even the lower bargain range of Androids.

This is a brilliant marketing move by Apple and the carriers are reporting a surge in sales of the 3GS and 4 as well as record sales of the 4S. One US carrier has reported that 55% of all smartphones that they are selling are now iPhones.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-1...tml?cmpid=yhoo

Same old song and dance. iPhone is going to catch up now, sure. I remember when Android had minimal market share and iOS was king. I didn't see anyone predicting android would grow so fast, to the point of outselling iphone 3 to 1. All I saw were predictions, one after another, that android growth would stall and iPhone would surge ahead with its new release. That didn't happen last year and surely will not happen this year. Could happen next year though!

Google's strategy is different, to capture the market with less profit on the front end, while offering the greatest choice to the widest possible market. There are high end devices that cost as much as iphones and also very low end devices, sliders, qwerty keys, etc. It turns out, not everyone likes the same design. Apple has the resources to create other offerings, just like their macbook line, but they don't and it costs them market share. So they must not care.

Like I said, apple will be happy with their 20% market share where profit margins are the highest. The entrenched user base is glad to pay a premium when they are already of the mindset that they pay more to have the best. In fact, apple could easily raise prices 50% across the board and enjoy even higher profits. Few would leave.
post #35 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radjin View Post

Could always wish for more but viruses and Trojans are not going to be a part of that list.

The best way to avoid OS-specific malware is to keep a small market share and so far it's working, but is showing signs of vulnerability. As for non-OS specific attacks, everyone is fair game and this is the area showing the most growth.
post #36 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

Maybe I'm too far out of the loop, but didn't think there were alternatives to the app store for buying media from the device. I realize you can shoehorn music and movies, that's true.

You can buy books, music and movies from any source, including hard copies on CD or DVD. They can then be transferred over to an ios device using itunes. Apps, however, have to be purchased through Apple's app store. The only way to install 3rd party apps from other sources is to jailbreak the device, which isn't something I recommend doing.

The books, music and movies you buy from itunes can also be moved to other devices. They're all stored in the itunes media folder and can be moved by dragging it over.

There are a lot of things on ios that people don't know or assume it can or can't do based on blog and tech articles they read online. And usually from people who've never actually used an ios device. If someone really wants to know, the best way to find out is to try one out for themselves. If they're not interested, then they're just posting on apple sites for other reasons or motives.
post #37 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

My best advice to friends is, "never become entrenched". Once you start choosing products and services based solely on the brand name, you are done. Always judge each individually on its own merit. The more expensive option will always appear simple, but by no means does that make it the best.

My best question to iPhone owners, advised by friends or relatives that iOS is closed or some other rubbish, is:-

"Do you want to plug your new phone into iTunes and have everything the same or start all over again, learning a new phone, all your Apps, messages, call lists, nearly everything comes across."

It takes 2 seconds for most to select iPhone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

Really? You think they have that kind of brand recognition? Hmm. maybe

I have an iPad2, but didn't choose it because of who made it or for the ecosystem. It was simply the best there was. My other gadgets (phone, internet TV box, laptop) aren't made by Apple, but for me they are the best or were at the time I bought them. It's not inconvenient to have products made by different companies even though most would have us believe otherwise. It would be very hard for one company to be the best in every product category. Apple is very good at what they do and that's why I bought their tablet.

...and almost every App you have on that iPad can be installed on an iPhone for free, as it's already in your iTunes library linked to your iTunes account.
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #38 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by neosum View Post

You can buy books, music and movies from any source, including hard copies on CD or DVD. They can then be transferred over to an ios device using itunes. Apps, however, have to be purchased through Apple's app store. The only way to install 3rd party apps from other sources is to jailbreak the device, which isn't something I recommend doing.

The books, music and movies you buy from itunes can also be moved to other devices. They're all stored in the itunes media folder and can be moved by dragging it over.

This is 'shoehorning' and it's not elegant. Yes, it's easy, but truly inelegant. It can be done just as simply within or between any two platforms. The ecosystem advantage goes out the window.

Quote:
Originally Posted by neosum View Post

There are a lot of things on ios that people don't know or assume it can or can't do based on blog and tech articles they read online. And usually from people who've never actually used an ios device. If someone really wants to know, the best way to find out is to try one out for themselves. If they're not interested, then they're just posting on apple sites for other reasons or motives.

I've had plenty of powermacs, mac pros, imacs, ipods, ipod touches and an iPad. I've been the apple evangelist. The whole thing started to smell a few years ago though and my perspective changed. It was a lot of little things that piled up, but the infamous straw was the itunes/ios walls going up, the so called ecosystem. Yes, I know it works for some people, but I wasn't willing to support it any more.
post #39 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

"Do you want to plug your new phone into iTunes and have everything the same or start all over again, learning a new phone, all your Apps, messages, call lists, nearly everything comes across."

...and almost every App you have on that iPad can be installed on an iPhone for free, as it's already in your iTunes library linked to your iTunes account.

If you ever feel like you can't switch to something new because it will be inconvenient, you are suffering from 'lock-in'. All mobile platforms have varying degrees of it, but Apple is notoriously bad and they are not ashamed.

The expression "starting all over" can be used to dissuade people, but getting your contacts, mail and social media apps setup on a different mobile platform is a 15 minute process. Can you export an iphone call log? probably not so that will take a week or so to get back. The same simplicity of upgrading phones applies to other platforms as well, not a big deal. And, no plugging it in, which I think we all now enjoy.
post #40 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

If you ever feel like you can't switch to something new because it will be inconvenient, you are suffering from 'lock-in'. All mobile platforms have varying degrees of it, but Apple is notoriously bad and they are not ashamed.

The expression "starting all over" can be used to dissuade people, but getting your contacts, mail and social media apps setup on a different mobile platform is a 15 minute process. Can you export an iphone call log? probably not so that will take a week or so to get back. The same simplicity of upgrading phones applies to other platforms as well, not a big deal. And, no plugging it in, which I think we all now enjoy.

Which lock in is this? You mean apps for a particular OS? How is Apple any different than anyone else?

You mean music? Steve Jobs is the CEO that called for the end of DRM while the RIAA and music CDs tried to make illegal and impossible to copy your music between formats.

I guess if you think Apple not licensing their OS to other vendors is some egregious lock-in then you'd have a point, but that's a pretty silly argument to make.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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