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North Carolina locals question benefits of Apple's $1 billion server farm

post #1 of 289
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A new report claims that local residents view Apple's massive data center in Maiden, N.C. has been a "disappointing development" because it has brought just 50 full-time jobs to the area, which is struggling with double-digit unemployment rates.

The Washington Post spoke to several residents from the small town of 3,400 about Apple's $1 billion project.

Apple really doesnt mean a thing to this town, said Tony Parker, a furniture maker in the town.

Kelly McRee, Parker's son-in-law, viewed the benefits of the company coming to town as largely symbolic. Apple was the apple of everybodys eye, but thats about it. It was something for everyone to ooh and aah over.

But, Maiden Town Manager William "Todd" Herms believes Apple does have a positive impact on residents' lives. I think the average citizen sees it affecting life, he said. They are a great corporate neighbor.

At the least, two residents have benefitted significantly from Apple's venture. Donnie and Kathy Fulbright received $1.7 million from the company for their one-acre property. Apple had to make several offers for their land and eventually asked them to set their own price.

As for others, the data center hasn't been a help to them. When asked how tough things were in Maiden, Samantha Saunders, the owner of a local hardware store, said, The extreme of tough.

An unemployed Maiden resident voiced doubt to the Post that jobs at the data center are actually accessible to locals. People from around here dont get those jobs, he said. Really, furniture is the only thing I know. Those data jobs are not for us.

The North Carolina legislature amended its corporate income tax law in order to offer Apple tax breaks of up to $46 million over the next 10 years to build its data center in the state. According to the report, local authorities have discounted property taxes by 50 percent and personal taxes by 85 percent. In exchange, Apple has created 50 full-time jobs and is also expected to create 250 "indirect contracting jobs."

The state's unemployment rate of 10.5 percent currently stands as one of the highest in the U.S. The area around Maiden has an even higher jobless rate of 13 percent.

Apple announced Maiden as the location for the data center project, codenamed "Project Dolphin," in 2009. According to the company, the server farm, which opened up earlier this year, supports its iTunes, MobileMe and iCloud services.

The Cupertino, Calif., company does not appear to be finished with developments on the data center. Recently-revealed permits show that Apple is looking to build a solar farm to power the facilities. AppleInsider reported earlier this month that renewable energy company Leaf Solar Power has been contracted to help with the project. Apple is also rumored to be interested in doubling the size of the 500,000 square-foot center.
post #2 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A new report claims that local residents view Apple's massive data center in Maiden, N.C. has been a "disappointing development" because it has brought just 50 full-time jobs to the area, which is struggling with double-digit unemployment rates.

The Washington Post spoke to several residents from the small town of 3,400 about Apple's $1 billion project.

Apple really doesnt mean a thing to this town, said Tony Parker, a furniture maker in the town.

Kelly McRee, Parker's son-in-law, viewed the benefits of the company coming to town as largely symbolic. Apple was the apple of everybodys eye, but thats about it. It was something for everyone to ooh and aah over.

But, Maiden Town Manager William "Todd" Herms believes Apple does have a positive impact on residents' lives. I think the average citizen sees it affecting life, he said. They are a great corporate neighbor.

At the least, two residents have benefitted significantly from Apple's venture. Donnie and Kathy Fulbright received $1.7 million from the company for their one-acre property. Apple had to make several offers for their land and eventually asked them to set their own price.

As for others, the data center hasn't been a help to them. When asked how tough things were in Maiden, Samantha Saunders, the owner of a local hardware store, said, The extreme of tough.

An unemployed Maiden resident voiced doubt to the Post that jobs at the data center are actually accessible to locals. People from around here dont get those jobs, he said. Really, furniture is the only thing I know. Those data jobs are not for us.

The North Carolina legislature amended its corporate income tax law in order to offer Apple tax breaks of up to $46 million over the next 10 years to build its data center in the state. According to the report, local authorities have discounted property taxes by 50 percent and personal taxes by 85 percent. In exchange, Apple has created 50 full-time jobs and is also expected to create 250 "indirect contracting jobs."

The state's unemployment rate of 10.5 percent currently stands as one of the highest in the U.S. The area around Maiden has an even higher jobless rate of 13 percent.

Apple announced Maiden as the location for the data center project, codenamed "Project Dolphin," in 2009. According to the company, the server farm, which opened up earlier this year, supports its iTunes, MobileMe and iCloud services.

The Cupertino, Calif., company does not appear to be finished with developments on the data center. Recently-revealed permits show that Apple is looking to build a solar farm to power the facilities. AppleInsider reported earlier this month that renewable energy company Leaf Solar Power has been contracted to help with the project. Apple is also rumored to be interested in doubling the size of the 500,000 square-foot center.

You are telling me 50 jobs that is all Apple offered. A dam disgrace indeed. This state is high in unemployment to begin with.Tim Cook and Apple better get their act together.
post #3 of 289
Why is it a disgrace? If the set up only requires 50 employees, then it only requires 50 employees! Why take on 150 people to have most of them sat around doing nothing? Or did I miss the news article that saw Apple become a registered charity?
post #4 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

You are telling me 50 jobs that is all Apple offered. A dam disgrace indeed. This state is high in unemployment to begin with.Tim Cook and Apple better get their act together.

Isn't 50 better then none? And what logic is there to hiring more then one needs?
post #5 of 289
Did those people ever stop to consider the tax breaks that city receives? Sure it might be 50 jobs but its probably high paying jobs for that area. I'd rather see 50 high paying jobs than 200 McDonalds paying jobs.
post #6 of 289
Well, some tax revenue is certainly better than none and I am sure Apple brings in nice chunk to the state. They will probably bring more after 10 years.

Most of the technical work to maintain modern data centers are done remotely so very few people are needed on the ground to phyiscally monitor the environment. Although Apple would still need landscaping companies, parking lot cleaners etc...

It's unfortunate that Apple and others can not build factories to assemble their products in NC or anywhere else in the states because it is just not economical. Steve Jobs personally told the president that the fact that the US can not build factories is an issue, the US government needs to take this very seriously. A factory in NC would surely put a lot of local people to work but instead all the jobs are going to China and Brazil.

Time will tell.
post #7 of 289
I see some woolly thinking. It may be true and very reasonable that locals are unhappy that only fifty jobs came with the data centre so far, but to conclude from that that Apple should have made more jobs simply doesn't follow. The choice the community has is to have Apple there and accept fifty new jobs, or have Apple go elsewhere and not have fifty new jobs. To say they would rather have had a new factory with 500 jobs is certainly understandable, but that's not Apple's fault! All sorts of folk wisdom has been directed at this common misdirection of blame, from the saying about not looking a gift horse in the mouth to Æsop's fables.

Chris
post #8 of 289
These damn unions.

</sarcasm>
post #9 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

You are telling me 50 jobs that is all Apple offered. A dam disgrace indeed. This state is high in unemployment to begin with.Tim Cook and Apple better get their act together.

Yes coz it makes sense to hire thousands of people to run a facility that only requires about 50.

So you want Apple to hire everyone in town...To do what? Just for the sake of hiring people that they actually don't need?

What Apple is brining in though is tax revenue for the town and state.
post #10 of 289
It is that attitude which is why the West is in the mess it is. Liberal thinking that says a) Employ people, even if you do not need or cannot afford them. b) Loan people money for items or property they havn't a hope in hell of repaying.

Further down the road, the wheels then start to fall off. As is happening now as overpaid council staff (here in UK anyway) are sapping up money that could otherwise pay for actual services.

Apple can do what they like, they are a private company. All that matters is they are environmentally responsible & treat their workers well, not to mention, help in the community. Perhaps by funding a local bus service for the elderly or similar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

You are telling me 50 jobs that is all Apple offered. A dam disgrace indeed. This state is high in unemployment to begin with.Tim Cook and Apple better get their act together.
post #11 of 289
The real issue here has nothing to do with apple. The real issue is that state and local governments fall all over themselves to give tax breaks to companies without really thinking about whether the benefits outweigh the costs. Another example is how cities fall all over themselves to build stadiums for sports franchises. I think it's largely a case of little people trying to feel big.

I don't know enough about the details here to know whether the NC folks made a mistake or not, but those sound like some pretty big tax cuts for a very small number of jobs. Again -- not apples fault -- they were honest about the number of jobs. The problem is a culture where everyone reflexively rolls over for big business.
post #12 of 289
It's getting so that anything that Apple does proves to be a disappointment. That's what happens when a company has been an achiever and then it becomes expected to excel at everything. I'm fairly certain that before the center had been built, Apple gave statistics on how many jobs the center would provide when completed and it certainly wasn't that high a number of jobs. I don't think this should really surprise anyone that made the decisions of bringing the data center to Maiden. When the solar farm gets running, that should provide a few more jobs, but there's really not going to be any major jobs there unless Apple decides to open a manufacturing plant of some sort. I guess since Apple is the wealthiest tech company on Wall Street, locals figure Apple can do so much more for residents. It's not going to happen. Apple is probably one of the most relatively frugal companies on record. When Apple reaches $100 billion in reserve cash, they'll be no different.
post #13 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

You are telling me 50 jobs that is all Apple offered. A dam disgrace indeed. This state is high in unemployment to begin with.Tim Cook and Apple better get their act together.

Apple is nothing like the NYC Metropolitan Transit Authority. No way is Apple going to provide a three to one redundancy for every employee. Apple should provide some free services to the town like bandwidth or iPads or MacBooks for the schools, but that's about as far as should be expected. Everyone should definitely know by now that it's not in Apple's DNA to give away things for free.
post #14 of 289
This is what Facebook did in here in Forest City, NC. Facebook has been there for over a year and I don't know anyone that works there or know anybody else that knows someone working there. I work next door at the North Carolina Data Center so you would think I would see someone besides the guards. The people that they did hire mainly came from Ohio. Google up in Lenoir even hired out of state. I can't complain about them wanting to save money on employee costs but come on. At least hire from within the state that is giving you the tax break. The skilled workers are here. Why not take advantage of them?
post #15 of 289
3400 people in the town.
A potiential for 25-250 jobs.
Unemployment rate at 13%

Worst case scenario 25 jobs brings unemployment down .7%
50 jobs brings it down 1.5%
250 jobs brings it down 7.4%
Plus tax money to the town.

I can see why some of these people think that data jobs from Apple isn't for them and why their unemployment rate is so high. Basic math and logic must be hard to come by in this small town...
post #16 of 289
Ah yes... Apple is in business so that it can "hire people." It serves no other purpose whatsoever. "Hiring out-of-work Americans" is Apple's sole reason for existence.

Has the world gone mad? Or is this just a slow news day?

And honestly, who cares? That especially holds true for those of us who don't live there. In the greater scheme of things, it really doesn't matter.
post #17 of 289
I live in Charlotte, not far from there. I spoke with someone who lives in Maiden a few weeks ago, the existence of the data center was at best a peripheral fact to her.

I agree, 50 is better than zero. Did they think iCloud would be powered by elves??
post #18 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by brandon28139 View Post

This is what Facebook did in here in Forest City, NC. Facebook has been there for over a year and I don't know anyone that works there or know anybody else that knows someone working there. I work next door at the North Carolina Data Center so you would think I would see someone besides the guards. The people that they did hire mainly came from Ohio. Google up in Lenoir even hired out of state. I can't complain about them wanting to save money on employee costs but come on. At least hire from within the state that is giving you the tax break. The skilled workers are here. Why not take advantage of them?

So your telling me you know everyone in Forest City, NC to confirm NO ONE locally works there? What about the neighboring towns do you know everyone there? You can't logically confirm Facebook, or any major company doesn't hire locally. Secondly since when we're jobs guaranteed locally? I though jobs go to the most qualified person? Why would these companies hire people that don't meet qualifications?
post #19 of 289
People who have been furniture makers their whole lives do not bring the skills necessary. It doesn't matter how many jobs Apple brings to this area the people who have lived there their whole lives do not have the skills. At least some one got jobs building it and the people who owned the land made out.

Apple did the right thing.
post #20 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

You are telling me 50 jobs that is all Apple offered. A dam disgrace indeed. This state is high in unemployment to begin with.Tim Cook and Apple better get their act together.

What exactly did you expect? If you have a town full of idiots, you really won't have many jobs for them in a data center. This is the greatest issue right now in America, people expecting jobs, handouts or whatever and taking no responsibility to obtain said jobs through education and self development.

It really is too bad that corporal punishment is frowned upon in the US these days because I honest believe the only way to reach people at this level is through brutal readjustment. One can not expect to be handed employment, it is earned just like anything else in this country.
post #21 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisrayb View Post

So your telling me you know everyone in Forest City, NC to confirm NO ONE locally works there? What about the neighboring towns do you know everyone there? You can't logically confirm Facebook, or any major company doesn't hire locally. Secondly since when we're jobs guaranteed locally? I though jobs go to the most qualified person? Why would these companies hire people that don't meet qualifications?

Further to your point...

I'm a recently hired remote worker for a megacorp. I suppose they could have hired my position out of one of the two main offices where this devision works out of, but I live in Milwaukee, which has a far higher unemployment than where those offices are. I also left an open position at my last job, which will also be filled from the Milwaukee pool. I'll be renting an office space in a nearby building, buying furniture and electronics from local retail, etc.

So just because the position didn't get filled locally doesn't mean the job didn't go to someone else who needed it.
post #22 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

What exactly did you expect? If you have a town full of idiots, you really won't have many jobs for them in a data center. This is the greatest issue right now in America, people expecting jobs, handouts or whatever and taking no responsibility to obtain said jobs through education and self development.

It really is too bad that corporal punishment is frowned upon in the US these days because I honest believe the only way to reach people at this level is through brutal readjustment. One can not expect to be handed employment, it is earned just like anything else in this country.

Maybe some brutal readjustment might work on you to make you a nicer person.
post #23 of 289
I understand why they would be disappointed in only 50 jobs -- they probably thought it would be a major employer, based on the size of the facility.

That just means that their expectations were out of line with reality. (Although -- those are some big tax breaks for only 50 jobs!)

The line that caught my attention -- the jobs 'are not for us' -- that's exactly right. And it's not Apple's problem. Furniture making is a fantastic skill -- but it doesn't lend itself at all to high tech jobs.

A high tech firm that needs lots of local workers would never be able to re-locate to Maiden, because the people don't have the skills to do the jobs. Better than complaining is to get their children educated enough so that in the future the children will be able to work those 50 jobs -- or some other high tech job.

If you want an example of how hard the Chinese are working at educating their kids -- http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/16/op...16kristof.html
post #24 of 289
50 is a lot better than zero. BTW, Apple is not a charity.

I wonder how much the area benefitted from all the construction jobs that it took to build the facility. Those workers had to buy food, gas, etc., etc. -- had to be a plus for the area.
post #25 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

It is that attitude which is why the West is in the mess it is. Liberal thinking that says a) Employ people, even if you do not need or cannot afford them. b) Loan people money for items or property they havn't a hope in hell of repaying.

I suppose I'm what you would consider a Liberal. I don't think either of those things, and neither does any Liberal I know.

Maybe those people didn't know much about what it takes to run a datacenter and thought that it would bring (or were told it would bring) more jobs to the area they'd be qualified for. And now they found out their not qualified and are disappointed by it.

Most people want to work and contribute. Stop buying into the right-wing fallacy that 50% of the planet wants to sit around and do nothing.
post #26 of 289
Balanced, rational posts sprinkled with delusional, reactionary replies to the big bad corporate giant that is Apple. I'm glad to see posters are wrapping up their holiday away from the computer.

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post #27 of 289
"According to the report, local authorities have discounted property taxes by 50 percent and personal taxes by 85 percent."

If THAT'S not a major benefit to everyone there, I don't know what is. Please Apple, come build a plant in my town. I wouldn't care if I work there or not if it means I'll get my property taxes chopped in half.
post #28 of 289
So it's Apple's fault that the local workforce doesn't posess the set of skills Apple requires? I don't think so.

The locals should challenge their local officials to work with businesses to come up with a plan to rapidly retrain the workforce for the available jobs. Without a concerted effort in that direction, the problem will persist.
post #29 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by haydn! View Post

Why is it a disgrace? If the set up only requires 50 employees, then it only requires 50 employees! Why take on 150 people to have most of them sat around doing nothing? Or did I miss the news article that saw Apple become a registered charity?


I agree that it makes no sense for Apple to hire additional people they don't need. However, as it often happens, local politicians granted Apple ridiculous tax breaks in exchange for... what, exactly?

This is the same old story that has played itself out at both the local and national level. Politicians and their corporate sponsors push the idea that businesses must be given tax breaks in order to create more jobs, except there's absolutely no strings attached that they actually do so, so it's nothing but corporate welfare. When new jobs are actually created they're usually small in number, low paying and in no way tied to whatever tax breaks the corporation received.

Considering Apple is one of (if not the) largest and most profitable companies on the planet, you have to wonder why they need any tax breaks or loopholes when there's no payback in exchange. Now I'm a huge Apple fan and I don't think they're doing anything wrong - as a business they're trying to minimize costs and maximize profits - but this is a fine example of why this tired old story needs to be put to rest and corporate welfare needs to end immediately.
post #30 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wings View Post

"According to the report, local authorities have discounted property taxes by 50 percent and personal taxes by 85 percent."

If THAT'S not a major benefit to everyone there, I don't know what is. Please Apple, come build a plant in my town. I wouldn't care if I work there or not if it means I'll get my property taxes chopped in half.

Of course. Having ratables is the important thing to any municipality. I wish they'd build one in MY town.
post #31 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wings View Post

"According to the report, local authorities have discounted property taxes by 50 percent and personal taxes by 85 percent."

If THAT'S not a major benefit to everyone there, I don't know what is. Please Apple, come build a plant in my town. I wouldn't care if I work there or not if it means I'll get my property taxes chopped in half.

Yes, and never mind the fact that those taxes are needed to pay for education, among other things, directly impacting the reason why there aren't more local people qualified to apply for Apple's higher paying jobs.
post #32 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

I agree that it makes no sense for Apple to hire additional people they don't need. However, as it often happens, local politicians granted Apple ridiculous tax breaks in exchange for... what, exactly?

This is the same old story that has played itself out at both the local and national level. Politicians and their corporate sponsors push the idea that businesses must be given tax breaks in order to create more jobs, except there's absolutely no strings attached that they actually do so, so it's nothing but corporate welfare. When new jobs are actually created they're usually small in number, low paying and in no way tied to whatever tax breaks the corporation received.

Considering Apple is one of (if not the) largest and most profitable companies on the planet, you have to wonder why they need any tax breaks or loopholes when there's no payback in exchange. Now I'm a huge Apple fan and I don't think they're doing anything wrong - as a business they're trying to minimize costs and maximize profits - but this is a fine example of why this tired old story needs to be put to rest and corporate welfare needs to end immediately.

Of course they don't need the tax break in the sense that they need a financial handout, but did they need to build in this town, in this county, in this state? I don't think any one of those three locations were a requirement so Apple held the cards. Does a retailer need to give a discount on Black Friday? Of course not, but they want to benefit from one of the busiest shopping days of the year so they lower prices to entice buyers. Tax breaks are no different to get the business that Apple would otherwise take elsewhere. This type of economics is not only common, but natural.

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post #33 of 289
Idiotic spending all the way around.

$1.7 million for an acre? Wow- that's Hawaii pricing (although that's a happy meal for apple).

North Carolina are the dumbest. $4.6 mil a year for 10 years for 50 jobs? Maybe (at most) 300? Wow...

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post #34 of 289
How many jobs were there when Donnie and Kathy Fulbright lived on that land?
How many jobs were there after Apple moved in?
post #35 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Of course they don't need the tax break in the sense that have no money, but did they need to build in this town, in this county, in this state? I don't think any one of those three locations were a requirement so Apple held the cards. Does a retailer need to give a discount on Black Friday? Of course not, but they want to benefit from one of the busiest shopping days of the year so they lower prices to entice buyers. Tax breaks are no different to get the business that Apple would otherwise take elsewhere. This type of economics is not only common, but natural.


When a retailer discounts its products, the intended result is an increase in sales, thereby making the promotion a productive investment.

But exactly how did the state or local community benefit from having Apple build their data center there? If Apple only created a few new jobs and if there were no other strings attached - for example helping to train/educate locals for high tech jobs - then what exactly did the community get in return for the $46 million tax breaks and loss of revenue from the 50% reduction in property taxes and 85% reduction in personal taxes that will only place increased strains on already struggling services such as education ?
post #36 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by walshbj View Post

I agree, 50 is better than zero. Did they think iCloud would be powered by elves??

Only if you don't have a supply of Oompa-Loompas.

post #37 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mugzy View Post

How many jobs were there when Donnie and Kathy Fulbright lived on that land?
How many jobs were there after Apple moved in?


Unless those 50 new jobs went to locals and paid about $1M each, I don't see how they offset the $46 million in tax breaks, not to mention the huge cuts in personal and property taxes, that will impact the residents of the town and state.
post #38 of 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisrayb View Post

3400 people in the town.
A potiential for 25-250 jobs.
Unemployment rate at 13%

Worst case scenario 25 jobs brings unemployment down .7%
50 jobs brings it down 1.5%
250 jobs brings it down 7.4%
Plus tax money to the town.

I can see why some of these people think that data jobs from Apple isn't for them and why their unemployment rate is so high. Basic math and logic must be hard to come by in this small town...

True- but unemployment is 15-65 yr olds. (sometimes 16-65 depending on state). So those numbers will increase. But I still agree with you that they're overreacting.

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post #39 of 289
"
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

tax breaks of up to $46 million over the next 10 years

I'm sure the nature of the jobs at the tech center disappointed locals. But how many man-years of construction employment did it provide the city? The county? The state? After the tax cut, is apple paying NO local or state taxes, or just a reduced amount? How much? How much will it pay annually starting ten years from now?

It's not an article--at least as reported here--that would pass many newspaper editors' desks without a demand for more.

(OT: It's like that Romney tv ad last week that criticized Obama for what he said--when Obama was really quoting a republican candidate to make a critical point. Worst part is, romney's camp, caught on the deceit, stood behind it. No matter who you're for, that's just bs).
post #40 of 289
Losers :-))
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A new report claims that local residents view Apple's massive data center in Maiden, N.C. has been a "disappointing development" because it has brought just 50 full-time jobs to the area, which is struggling with double-digit unemployment rates.

The Washington Post spoke to several residents from the small town of 3,400 about Apple's $1 billion project.

Apple really doesnt mean a thing to this town, said Tony Parker, a furniture maker in the town.

Kelly McRee, Parker's son-in-law, viewed the benefits of the company coming to town as largely symbolic. Apple was the apple of everybodys eye, but thats about it. It was something for everyone to ooh and aah over.

But, Maiden Town Manager William "Todd" Herms believes Apple does have a positive impact on residents' lives. I think the average citizen sees it affecting life, he said. They are a great corporate neighbor.

At the least, two residents have benefitted significantly from Apple's venture. Donnie and Kathy Fulbright received $1.7 million from the company for their one-acre property. Apple had to make several offers for their land and eventually asked them to set their own price.

As for others, the data center hasn't been a help to them. When asked how tough things were in Maiden, Samantha Saunders, the owner of a local hardware store, said, The extreme of tough.

An unemployed Maiden resident voiced doubt to the Post that jobs at the data center are actually accessible to locals. People from around here dont get those jobs, he said. Really, furniture is the only thing I know. Those data jobs are not for us.

The North Carolina legislature amended its corporate income tax law in order to offer Apple tax breaks of up to $46 million over the next 10 years to build its data center in the state. According to the report, local authorities have discounted property taxes by 50 percent and personal taxes by 85 percent. In exchange, Apple has created 50 full-time jobs and is also expected to create 250 "indirect contracting jobs."

The state's unemployment rate of 10.5 percent currently stands as one of the highest in the U.S. The area around Maiden has an even higher jobless rate of 13 percent.

Apple announced Maiden as the location for the data center project, codenamed "Project Dolphin," in 2009. According to the company, the server farm, which opened up earlier this year, supports its iTunes, MobileMe and iCloud services.

The Cupertino, Calif., company does not appear to be finished with developments on the data center. Recently-revealed permits show that Apple is looking to build a solar farm to power the facilities. AppleInsider reported earlier this month that renewable energy company Leaf Solar Power has been contracted to help with the project. Apple is also rumored to be interested in doubling the size of the 500,000 square-foot center.
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