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Rumor: Apple axed 'evolutionary' 64-bit Final Cut Pro 8 for 'revolutionary' FCPX

post #1 of 148
Thread Starter 
Apple may have canceled production of an "evolutionary" 64-bit Final Cut Pro 8 update in favor of what it viewed as a "revolutionary" update with what eventually became the controversial Final Cut Pro X [updated].

Richard Harrington, founder of RHED Pixel, said in a recent talk that Apple killed production of a 64-bit Final Cut Pro 8 after officials with the company were not satisfied with what they saw. Harrington's comments, discovered by fcp.co and highlighted by Cult of Mac, were made in reference to American University's decision to train its students in Final Cut Pro X.

"There was a Final Cut Pro 8, and it was 64-bit and it was done," Harrington said. "And they looked at it and said, 'This is not what we want to do. This is evolutionary, this is not revolutionary.' And they killed it."

Update: Harrington later provided clarification via Twitter, saying he did not hear the information first-hand, but rather that it was simply a rumor passed along with an off-hand comment.

"Comment was misunderstood," he wrote. "I just heard efforts were well underway then killed."

The video has since been pulled from the Web. But if the rumor is accurate, it's an indication that Apple originally considered following along the same path as Final Cut Pro 7, before it decided to take its professional video editing software in an entirely new direction.

Those considerable changes made in Final Cut Pro X rubbed many video professionals the wrong way when the new $299 software was released this June. Apple also worked quickly to release an update for Final Cut Pro X to add some of the most requested features, like Xsan and Rich XML support.

Apple has also promised that it will add multicam editing and broadcast-quality video monitoring to Final Cut Pro X in early 2012. The software has also been made available for a 30-day free trial to let professionals try before they buy.

The changes in Final Cut Pro X caused a significant controversy in the video editing and production business. The attention became so great that even comedian Conan O'Brien had a bit on his show poking fun at the new software.



Apple also responded to customer dissatisfaction by offering refunds, and the company even offered some customers the ability to buy the previous generation Final Cut Pro Studio with Final Cut Pro 7 for $999. Sales of Final Cut Pro Studio were made available only over the phone, and were said to be in "limited quantity" for customers who needed the older software for ongoing projects.

AppleInsider first reported in May of 2010 that Apple was scaling Final Cut Studio applications with a significant makeover that would better target Apple's mainstream "prosumer" customer base, rather than high-end professionals. After the public release of Final Cut Pro X, some in video editing circles began to deride the software with the name "iMovie Pro," referring to Apple's consumer-oriented video editing software, iMovie.
post #2 of 148
Just more evidence that Apple needs to split if they want to provide products to both professionals and consumers.

post #3 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by strobe View Post

Just more evidence that Apple needs to split if they want to provide products to both professionals and consumers.


Im your typical dad who does slight video editing of basic vacations, etc. I like Final Cut Pro X better than 7 because I was more familiar with iMovie. But Apple obviously has made the move to consumer (i.e. Aperture and FCPX) and left Adobe to pick up the pros (i.e. Photoshop and Premiere). I definitely like FCPX vs Premier Elements. So they have my $ there. And my wife prefers Photoshop elements over Photoshop CS5 (and oddly- prefers iPhoto over Aperture 3).

Different strokes for different folks. I think it was a smart move by Apple as FCPX will sell more and they can't justify having two paid programs for video editing- even though it sucks for the FCP 7/8 fans.

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post #4 of 148
When Apple was "Apple Computer, Inc." they were more concerned with making powerful Macintosh computers that were used by the publishing, graphic arts, film making, and other creative industries. The higher-end models even echoed some of the high-end workstation-class systems from NEXT. To have an G5 Tower used to be the mark of an accomplished power user. The Apple website would have a front page link to the Pro Story of the week, talking about some business or government or University that deployed a huge IT solution using Apple Pro software and Pro-level Macintosh systems.

Then Apple went consumer, got into making iPods and selling music, and iPhones, and had a whole ton of non-pros using their products, many of whom thought Macs were too difficult to switch to. So Apple worked on making Macs easier to switch to and even easier to work with those consumer products the non-Pros were buying.

Then, Apple became "Apple, Inc." They are getting way more money from non-Pros and pro-sumers than the actual Pros... and they've shifted.

Apple's target market went from University/IT/Creative Pros to middle-to-upper class households that drink Keurig Coffee while they use iPads to read books on their IKEA couch, pondering which wine to have with their Chicken & Gnocchi soup for dinner tonight, as their MacBook Pro is downloading the latest iTunes Movie Rental over 50MB broadband in the living room of a $150K house or $2000/mo apartment in the city, while their Ugg boots dry nicely in the corner beside their North Face winter coat.
post #5 of 148
^ True, but Ikea doesn't make good sofas
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post #6 of 148
Courage is what make me respect Apple, more than ITs products.

Courage IS SO undervalued in techWorld.
post #7 of 148
^ agreed!
post #8 of 148
Everyone keeps saying that Apple has made a shift from prosumer to consumer with this software... but I'm not convinced. I think that Apple has simply made an intelligent wager on this paradigm shift with FCPX which has, for the time being, reduced its feature set. However, over time when they regain these features they'll be 5 legs up on other pro editor apps, already prepared to interface with future hardware changes in the industry (such as touch screens).

And guess who controls the future of hardware in the industry.
post #9 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by vandil View Post

Apple's target market went from University/IT/Creative Pros to middle-to-upper class households that drink Keurig Coffee while they use iPads to read books on their IKEA couch, pondering which wine to have with their Chicken & Gnocchi soup for dinner tonight, as their MacBook Pro is downloading the latest iTunes Movie Rental over 50MB broadband in the living room of a $150K house or $2000/mo apartment in the city, while their Ugg boots dry nicely in the corner beside their North Face winter coat.

Perfect summary. I miss the days of "pro story of the week". It was inspiring to see what the big boys were doing while we tinkered and toyed around and tried to emulate the things they were doing. Now, there is nothing inspirational there anymore. Now it is watch the iCloud video, watch the latest iPod ad or engrave your latest product. Even Steve is gone so yet another layer of inspiration gone. Nobody wants to be Tim Cook. Maybe Jony Ive.

I've seriously been considering a switch back to Windows because I can get the latest and greatest hardware, gaming, and speed without paying a premium for OS X. It used to be that the best apps were on OS X only, but that is not the case anymore and you ultimately end up paying a premium on hardware just for OS X. Struggling with that decision. Abandoning the Mac Pro and Final Cut Pro doesn't help their case to keep me. If they want to go consumer, then so be it. Back to Windows I go.

Also, have you been watching Fight Club lately? :-)
post #10 of 148
And AI was wrong about FCPX being prosumer.
Repeating it doesn't make it right.

J.
post #11 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Filmantopia View Post

Everyone keeps saying that Apple has made a shift from prosumer to consumer with this software... But I'm not convinced. I think that Apple has simply made an intelligent wager on this paradigm shift with FCPX which has, for the time being, reduced its feature set. However, over time when they regain these features they'll be 5 legs up on other pro editor apps, already prepared to interface with future hardware changes in the industry (such as touch screens).

Below is the Mac Pro Refresh Schedule from MacRumors. If this isn't enough to convince you they are abandoning the Pro's...also - by the time they have those features studios will have cross-graded already. Apple has given ZERO assurances that they are not abandoning the Pro's. During the FCPX debacle they begrudgingly caved and they have done nothing to counter the Mac Pro death rumors. If they want us to buy iMacs that we cannot get in and out of easily for 3rd party cards and upgrades then why bother? It is going to take a long time for manufacturers to catch up with Thunderbolt so what happens in the mean time? Can get faster hardware cheaper and the days of apps being exclusive to OS X are gone as Windows developers have come a long way. Basically you are paying a premium for OS X. I am struggling to understand why they are abandoning power users and Pros. Makes no sense to me. Again, if they give us some assurances then my arguments will go away but having been a life long Pro Mac User it is disheartening.

???
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post #12 of 148
If FCP8 was done


Where's Carbon Quicktime 64-bit? I've never seen mention of it
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post #13 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by blur35mm View Post

Below is the Mac Pro Refresh Schedule from MacRumors.

Which remains completely wrong. There was no update in 2008. Apple added a processor. Absolutely nothing about the Mac Pro changed in the 518 days between the release of the W… Wolfdale (is that what it was called?) and the Penryn Mac Pro. Not price, not specs.

Quote:
If this isn't enough to convince you they are abandoning the Pro's...

… then you're well-versed in Intel's release schedule and know that Apple can't possibly update any faster than new chips are made available.

Quote:
…the days of apps being exclusive to OS X are gone…

Weren't those days gone by 1987?

Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Where's Carbon Quicktime 64-bit?

Do you mean Cocoa? I'm not sure why people would be waiting for a Carbon version of anything.
post #14 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ochyming View Post

Courage is what make me respect Apple, more than ITs products.

Courage IS SO undervalued in techWorld.

What's courageous about taking the easy path?
post #15 of 148
Having actually used FCPX, I laugh whenever I read that it isn't for "professional" customers. True, it's missing a lot of functionality, and isn't the tool I would recommend everyone to switch to right now full time. That is a temporary problem, however. In time, this app is going to morph into something that can be used to quickly cut anything from vacation footage and promo videos to full length feature films. Hell, it *already* does that. It just needs a few plugins and features to satisfy a majority of users out there, and they are coming.

I question a lot of the criticism out there. How much of it are legitimate complaints, and how much of it are simply people refusing any sort of change. While there are things I miss from more traditional NLEs, and can name a few quirks I despise in the current version, FCPX has a lot of promise and potential that will definitely improve with time. When you get a good workflow going, it's shockingly fast cutting together video is compared to what I used to do with Adobe Premiere.

Plus, FCPX is a *huge* value proposition. If you figure that the typical suites from Avid and Adobe cost around $2500, while FCPX along with Motion and Compressor total $400, you can basically get the editing license *AND* the hardware for the same price you'd pay just for the software alone from the competition. If you're looking to expand your production house, you can save a lot of money by going with Apple. Man, how often do you hear that statement?
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post #16 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post




Do you mean Cocoa? I'm not sure why people would be waiting for a Carbon version of anything.

No. I think the thing that is odd here is that FCP 7 and earlier used Quicktime 32 as its core which was Carbon 32-bit. In order for FCP-8 to be 64-bit, Carbon would also have to be 64-bit and Apple killed that project pretty early
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post #17 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by blur35mm View Post

Perfect summary. I miss the days of "pro story of the week". It was inspiring to see what the big boys were doing while we tinkered and toyed around and tried to emulate the things they were doing. Now, there is nothing inspirational there anymore. Now it is watch the iCloud video, watch the latest iPod ad or engrave your latest product. Even Steve is gone so yet another layer of inspiration gone. Nobody wants to be Tim Cook. Maybe Jony Ive.

I've seriously been considering a switch back to Windows because I can get the latest and greatest hardware, gaming, and speed without paying a premium for OS X. It used to be that the best apps were on OS X only, but that is not the case anymore and you ultimately end up paying a premium on hardware just for OS X. Struggling with that decision. Abandoning the Mac Pro and Final Cut Pro doesn't help their case to keep me. If they want to go consumer, then so be it. Back to Windows I go.

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Don't take yourself so seriously. You declare your intention to go back to Windows like the world should take notice? Should I announce my intention to switch brands of motor oil? You know, because its really important for the Internet to know my personal choices! (Yeah right). Apple perhaps made the wrong call, but I thought serious (read: Pro) editors cut on Avid anyway. Oh sure, there were Hollywood editors using FCP, and they've denounced FCPX. But you're not one of them, are you? You're not complaining about Apple borking your editing toolchain. You're complaining about OS X "premiums" and how it cramps your lifestyle choice. If that's the case, then I would say you never valued OS X to begin with. I pay whatever extra it costs to have a Microsoft-free computing experience

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post #18 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

If FCP8 was done


Where's Carbon Quicktime 64-bit? I've never seen mention of it

That's because I don't think the 64-bit version of FCP8 was ever "done." I'm sure it was being worked on, but trying to get a behemoth like FCP7 upgraded to 64-bit along with *every* accompanying process would have just been too difficult to do. You basically need to do a rewrite of everything, which is what Adobe likes to do every few years anyway.

Apple made a decision along the way to say that if they are going to rewrite the fundamental architecture of this program into Cocoa, this is their chance to rethink the entire experience end-to-end, from UI and media management to distribution and price. They knew that the old Final Cut Pro could not carry them into the next decade as far as what goals they've set for themselves. Sure, Apple screwed a lot of editors over the short term, just like they screwed over developers when they axed OpenDoc or screwed their users when they eliminated the floppy drive. History is on their side, but time will tell if their decision with FCPX proved to be right.

Put it this way - Apple is quick to eliminate anything it doesn't see important to their bottom line. If they seriously did not care about their pro customers, they would have ceased all development on Final Cut Pro and continue to be satisfied selling more iPads. Instead, they rebuilt from the ground up a brand new system that has a lot of flexibility and room to grow with, ensuring it will be around for quite some time. Who knows? We me actually see a full fledged version of FCPX on iOS someday.
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post #19 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by blur35mm View Post

Below is the Mac Pro Refresh Schedule from MacRumors. If this isn't enough to convince you they are abandoning the Pro's...

Don't let actual facts get in the way of your innuendo. Facts like Intel's high-end Xeon chipset won't be ready until early 2012. Gee, and what does Apple use in their Mac Pros?
post #20 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conrail View Post

What's courageous about taking the easy path?

You're kidding, right? They may or may not succeed in porting it into a totally professional paradigm. But the move definitely had balls. If they succeed, it's a workflow game changer.
post #21 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gustav View Post

Don't let actual facts get in the way of your innuendo. Facts like Intel's high-end Xeon chipset won't be ready until early 2012. Gee, and what does Apple use in their Mac Pros?

First versions of the Sandy Bridge Xeon E3 processors ship in December, while the high-end chip won't ship until March. Apple is most likely working with Intel to get these machines ready and out the door as soon as they can.

It's the same reason why Apple kept the Core 2 Duo around in their lower-end MacBooks years after the original i5 and i7 chips were released - the on board graphics capabilities of those earlier chips didn't support OpenCL, and Intel wasn't licensing the socket type to other chipset makers. That meant Apple was forced to use the older CPUs in order to be able to rely on nVidia's integrated graphics solution, which allowed for OpenCL and decent graphics performance without sacrificing the design of their products to fit in a discrete graphics chip.

But then again, this is the Internet we're talking about. Facts have no place, here .
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post #22 of 148
So Apple please go back and finish it! There is room for FCPro 8 and Final Cut X. Just drop iMovie for X and you're all set.
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post #23 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conrail View Post

What's courageous about taking the easy path?

Ha, explain to me what's "easy" about rewriting a complex video editor from scratch? When you think about it, wouldn't the "easy path" be to simply update FCP8?
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post #24 of 148
This move by Apple is likely introducing more people to Final Cut and will generate more turnover.

Meanwhile I will switch to Avid or Premiere (I hate the idea but I have to). My students at art university will switch too (some already have (here in Zurich, Switzerland)). Then they go out and become part of the creative industry. Film makers, motion designers, 3D artists, composers, editors, screen writers, stage designers, ... And since we are already at it we might as well (or will be forced by Apple with similar moves on the hardware side) to switch hardware. A minority of users, of course. But the creative industry was where Apple gained a lot of cudos, and a lot of free advertising. So I'm curious to see what the means for Apple in the long run. Image-wise first. Then turnover-wise.
post #25 of 148
I watched that video when it was up.

My impression is that Richard Harrington made his decision to switch to Adobe long before Final Cut X was previewed to editors.

For his needs, Adobe appeared to be a better solution.

As to the statement about FCP 8... It was almost mentioned in passing -- with very little elaboration:

Quote:
an "evolutionary" 64-bit Final Cut Pro 8 update

I suspect that FCP 8 did not have some of the "revolutionary" features of FCP X that are beginning to gain favor -- things like wicked-fast editing UI, background rendering, magnetic story-line, comprehensive metadata...

AIR, sometime in the last year or so, some Final Cut Apple developers left Apple in a disagreement -- likely. over FCP8 vs FCP X.

Finally, Richard Harrington, towards the end of the video, said that FCP X was a good product that would satisfy the majority of editing needs -- and there were only about 10,000 editors in the world that needed something more robust than the current FCP X!

The panelists generally agreed that most editors should know at 2 least NLEs. Another panelist, Larry Engel, said that they were training all their students in FCP X.

Quote:
...Larry Engel, Filmmaker in Residence at American University. It was Larry's and the University's decision to train all new students on FCPX which was the original newsworthy reason why we were going to post the video.

Here's another fcp.co video worth watching:

MacBreak Studio talks about audio editing and plugin problems in FCPX

Beware: If you are familiar with NLEs and have pre-judged FCP X -- you might see some things that show you a preview of the future of editing...

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post #26 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Filmantopia View Post

Everyone keeps saying that Apple has made a shift from prosumer to consumer with this software... but I'm not convinced. I think that Apple has simply made an intelligent wager on this paradigm shift with FCPX which has, for the time being, reduced its feature set. However, over time when they regain these features they'll be 5 legs up on other pro editor apps, already prepared to interface with future hardware changes in the industry (such as touch screens).

And guess who controls the future of hardware in the industry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yuusharo View Post

Ha, explain to me what's "easy" about rewriting a complex video editor from scratch? When you think about it, wouldn't the "easy path" be to simply update FCP8?

By easy path, I meant it's easier (and more economically rewarding) to cater to people who fall for buzzwords like "magical" and are happy if their Angry Birds player comes in multiple colors, as opposed to making products based on what the user requires as opposed to what looks pretty.
post #27 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by blur35mm View Post

I miss the days of "pro story of the week". It was inspiring to see what the big boys were doing while we tinkered and toyed around and tried to emulate the things they were doing. Now, there is nothing inspirational there anymore.

Ah, you have discovered the secret sauce. As long as the pro's were using the product, you could tinker and dream. Now all you can do is tinker. Do you need new software for that?

Why spend money on FCPX and get something that makes you no better than your neighbor? Before this, you could dream. You could imagine making something even your neighbor would ooh and aah over. Now, bleh, anyone can edit as well as you.

Yes, Apple will sell lots of copies of FCPX. But, no longer will you be getting the ability to dream you could edit like a pro.
post #28 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by glnf View Post

This move by Apple is likely introducing more people to Final Cut and will generate more turnover.

Meanwhile I will switch to Avid or Premiere (I hate the idea but I have to). My students at art university will switch too (some already have (here in Zurich, Switzerland)). Then they go out and become part of the creative industry. Film makers, motion designers, 3D artists, composers, editors, screen writers, stage designers, ... And since we are already at it we might as well (or will be forced by Apple with similar moves on the hardware side) to switch hardware. A minority of users, of course. But the creative industry was where Apple gained a lot of cudos, and a lot of free advertising. So I'm curious to see what the means for Apple in the long run. Image-wise first. Then turnover-wise.

You know what, that's a fine decision. Each of these companies have different goals and audiences they cater to, and your students should definitely learn what the industry demands right now. I think it's silly for anyone to learn FCP7 at this point.

That said, I still think it will be valuable for your students to at least be aware of FCPX and how it works. I don't think it'll be used by most major production houses, but then again, they weren't using Final Cut to being with. It's definitely a "wait and see" approach, but I wouldn't write of FCPX right now, especially since it is a very capable tool for being a 1.0 product.
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post #29 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm6032 View Post

Ah, you have discovered the secret sauce. As long as the pro's were using the product, you could tinker and dream. Now all you can do is tinker. Do you need new software for that?

Why spend money on FCPX and get something that makes you no better than your neighbor? Before this, you could dream. You could imagine making something even your neighbor would ooh and aah over. Now, bleh, anyone can edit as well as you.

Yes, Apple will sell lots of copies of FCPX. But, no longer will you be getting the ability to dream you could edit like a pro.

Here is a quote from Wikipedia about usage in 2007.

"According to a 2007 SCRI study, Final Cut Pro made up 49% of the US professional editing market, with Avid at 22%."

That was a pretty significant market penetration. I wonder how many of those are now using FCProX instead ... I seriously doubt many: I really hope Apple are looking into going back to 8 and finishing it for pros.
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post #30 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Watch out. ConradJoe will add you to his Enemies List
Don't take yourself so seriously. You declare your intention to go back to Windows like the world should take notice? Should I announce my intention to switch brands of motor oil? You know, because its really important for the Internet to know my personal choices! (Yeah right).

Most of the Internet is people voicing their opinions and choices... It's what makes the Internet tick - ad revenue, selling, marketing, consumer ratings, social media etc...

The 'motor oil' brands pay billions of dollars to find out why you switch brands... So I'm pretty sure they would be ecstatic if you let people know your switching brands and why.

I found his post interesting and informative (more then yours), as our company finds itself in a similar situation - after 25 years of Apple we are actually considering a switch to windows for the same reasons. Apple has and is abandoning the prosumer market.

Don't be so quick to judge what people find valuable in these forums that they actually spend the time to read them.
post #31 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by rain View Post

Most of the Internet is people voicing their opinions and choices... It's what makes the Internet tick - ad revenue, selling, marketing, consumer ratings, social media etc...

The 'motor oil' brands pay billions of dollars to find out why you switch brands... So I'm pretty sure they would be ecstatic if you let people know your switching brands and why.

I found his post interesting and informative (more then yours), as our company finds itself in a similar situation - after 25 years of Apple we are actually considering a switch to windows for the same reasons. Apple has and is abandoning the prosumer market.

Don't be so quick to judge what people find valuable in these forums that they actually spend the time to read them.

Excuse me but Apple is embracing the prosumer market! It may or may not be letting down the folks in the professional market (I will have to wait another year or so to answer that one) but certainly not the prosumers. FinalCut X, as an example, is totally a prosumer product.
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post #32 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Here is a quote from Wikipedia about usage in 2007.

"According to a 2007 SCRI study, Final Cut Pro made up 49% of the US professional editing market, with Avid at 22%."

That was a pretty significant market penetration. I wonder how many of those are now using FCProX instead ... I seriously doubt many: I really hope Apple are looking into going back to 8 and finishing it for pros.

The day Apple releases an option for a professional display (35 cents worth of chemical coating), is the day you know Apple wants professionals looking at their products again.

Sadly, that day hasn't come.
post #33 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Excuse me but Apple is embracing the prosumer market! It may or may not be letting down the folks in the professional market (I will have to wait another year or so to answer that one) but certainly not the prosumers. FinalCut X, as an example, is totally a prosumer product.

Ok Zoolander, but how do you expect people to use the software if they can't even see what's on the screen?
post #34 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by vandil View Post

When Apple was "Apple Computer, Inc." they were more concerned with making powerful Macintosh computers that were used by the publishing, graphic arts, film making, and other creative industries. The higher-end models even echoed some of the high-end workstation-class systems from NEXT. To have an G5 Tower used to be the mark of an accomplished power user. The Apple website would have a front page link to the Pro Story of the week, talking about some business or government or University that deployed a huge IT solution using Apple Pro software and Pro-level Macintosh systems.

Then Apple went consumer, got into making iPods and selling music, and iPhones, and had a whole ton of non-pros using their products, many of whom thought Macs were too difficult to switch to. So Apple worked on making Macs easier to switch to and even easier to work with those consumer products the non-Pros were buying.

Then, Apple became "Apple, Inc." They are getting way more money from non-Pros and pro-sumers than the actual Pros... and they've shifted.

Apple's target market went from University/IT/Creative Pros to middle-to-upper class households that drink Keurig Coffee while they use iPads to read books on their IKEA couch, pondering which wine to have with their Chicken & Gnocchi soup for dinner tonight, as their MacBook Pro is downloading the latest iTunes Movie Rental over 50MB broadband in the living room of a $150K house or $2000/mo apartment in the city, while their Ugg boots dry nicely in the corner beside their North Face winter coat.

Nice post.

I wonder if the reason why Apple is "ditching" the pro market can be traced back to fact that the pro market never really adopted the NEXT platform and Job held kinda held a grudge against the pro market...
post #35 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by blur35mm View Post

Perfect summary. I miss the days of "pro story of the week". It was inspiring to see what the big boys were doing while we tinkered and toyed around and tried to emulate the things they were doing. Now, there is nothing inspirational there anymore. Now it is watch the iCloud video, watch the latest iPod ad or engrave your latest product. Even Steve is gone so yet another layer of inspiration gone. Nobody wants to be Tim Cook. Maybe Jony Ive.

I've seriously been considering a switch back to Windows because I can get the latest and greatest hardware, gaming, and speed without paying a premium for OS X. It used to be that the best apps were on OS X only, but that is not the case anymore and you ultimately end up paying a premium on hardware just for OS X. Struggling with that decision. Abandoning the Mac Pro and Final Cut Pro doesn't help their case to keep me. If they want to go consumer, then so be it. Back to Windows I go.

Also, have you been watching Fight Club lately? :-)

Have you tried FCP X?

Seriously, there are some things you can do better/faster/easier in FCP X than any other way.

Consider filming a sports event, like a football game where you use several cameras to follow certain players... then, ingesting the film, highlighting the selected shot, and publishing an instant replay;

Here's a short video to illustrate what I mean:

This is my grandson (the goal keep) shot with a Panny AVCHD from about 50 yards away:

The 2nd half of the video the highlighted part was made in less than 7 seconds with FCP X.

Dish Punt Shape Highlight

Scrub the video to how the highlight shape changes: location; size; shape -- this was done as follows:

-- position playhead
-- set keyframe
-- draw color shape mask

-- move playhead (to where highlight adjustment needed)
-- set keyframe
-- reposition color shape mask (if needed)
-- resize shape color shape mask (if needed)

....

-- move playhead (to where highlight adjustment needed)
-- set keyframe
-- reposition color shape mask (if needed)
-- resize color shape mask (if needed)

Automatic tweening is performed in the intermediate frames

Seriously, FCP X has a 30-day free trial... and it is quite powerful if you approach it without preconceived notions on how an NLE should work.

"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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post #36 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by rain View Post

The 'motor oil' brands pay billions of dollars to find out why you switch brands... So I'm pretty sure they would be ecstatic if you let people know your switching brands and why.

Really?
Ok, motor oil brands: you can have my opinion for the starting price of $1 billion. Valvoline? Pennzoil? Quaker State? Who will start the bidding for my opinion?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #37 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Excuse me but Apple is embracing the prosumer market! It may or may not be letting down the folks in the professional market (I will have to wait another year or so to answer that one) but certainly not the prosumers. FinalCut X, as an example, is totally a prosumer product.

I hate that word.

You know, I helped cut an independent film a few years ago on Final Cut Pro 6 at the time, and lately I have been saying to myself recently, "Wow, if we had this back then, things would have been so much easier." We spent literally hours color correcting some scenes, and I know that many (not all) could have been fixed in a few minutes with FCPX's automatic color correction. Also, having features like compound clips would have helped prevent the occasional loss of sync from certain video and audio elements as we made changes earlier in the timeline.

So here's my question - are we less professional if we would have preferred using FCPX over the older systems at the time? Are we not "professionals" if we're not backed by a multi-million dollar studio? I hate this idea that FCPX is only used by "prosumers" simply because it's missing some features. I'd say a lot of us video editors consider ourselves professionals. If FCPX's current feature set works well within your workflow, why not use it? The tool doesn't make the man. If it works for you, great. If it doesn't, there's alternatives.

But seriously, FCPX is not just for "prosumers."
Video editor, tech enthusiast, developer.

http://www.yuusharo.com
http://www.studioyuu.com
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Video editor, tech enthusiast, developer.

http://www.yuusharo.com
http://www.studioyuu.com
Reply
post #38 of 148
From a business perspective, I respect Apple's direction on FCP X: Court hundreds of thousands of amateur/enthusiasts with something more powerful than iMovie that serves 98% of their workflow needs, or satisfy 72 industry professionals with such granular workflows that anything short of Final Cut Pro God Edition would not be enough?
post #39 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuusharo View Post

Having actually used FCPX, I laugh whenever I read that it isn't for "professional" customers. True, it's missing a lot of functionality, and isn't the tool I would recommend everyone to switch to right now full time. That is a temporary problem, however. In time, this app is going to morph into something that can be used to quickly cut anything from vacation footage and promo videos to full length feature films. Hell, it *already* does that. It just needs a few plugins and features to satisfy a majority of users out there, and they are coming.

I question a lot of the criticism out there. How much of it are legitimate complaints, and how much of it are simply people refusing any sort of change. While there are things I miss from more traditional NLEs, and can name a few quirks I despise in the current version, FCPX has a lot of promise and potential that will definitely improve with time. When you get a good workflow going, it's shockingly fast cutting together video is compared to what I used to do with Adobe Premiere.

Plus, FCPX is a *huge* value proposition. If you figure that the typical suites from Avid and Adobe cost around $2500, while FCPX along with Motion and Compressor total $400, you can basically get the editing license *AND* the hardware for the same price you'd pay just for the software alone from the competition. If you're looking to expand your production house, you can save a lot of money by going with Apple. Man, how often do you hear that statement?

Not to forget, you can legally run a single copy of FCP X, Motion 5, Compressor concurrently on 5 Macs.

That's $400 for 5 seats -- Other NLE suites above are per 1 seat, e.g.

FCP 7 costs $1,000 per == $5,000 for 5 seats!
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #40 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by rain View Post

Ok Zoolander, but how do you expect people to use the software if they can't even see what's on the screen?

not this again...
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