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Apple submits updated renderings, plans for Cupertino spaceship campus

post #1 of 39
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Newly submitted renderings of Apple's proposed 13,000-employee mega-campus in Cupertino, Calif., depict a roof with a dark-grey material, a jogging path and modest changes to the ancillary fitness center.

The City of Cupertino posted an update to the company's "Apple Campus 2 Project" on Tuesday evening. Though most of the new renderings are higher-quality, better-lit versions of the original design, some of the images also appear to show a darker color for the structure's roof.

Other minor changes in the revised application include the addition of parking plans for the corporate auditorium, drawings for a private jogging path and a proposed expansion of the corporate fitness center from the original proposal of 25,000 square feet to 45,000 square feet. The fitness center appears to have lost a floor in the process, as the new submittal lists the facility's height as 18 feet instead of the original 30 feet.

Late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs first unveiled the project at a Cupertino town hall meeting in June. The 2.8 million square-foot office building, which would boast a wider diameter than the Pentagon, would house 13,000 employees.

"It's a little like a spaceship landed," Jobs said of the building, which has a circular shape with curved glass all the way around. According to him, Apple has "a shot at building the best office building in the world."

Original rendering, left; Updated rendering, right.


However, some critics have taken issue with Apple's design choices. The Los Angeles Times architecture critic has called the project a "retrograde cocoon," disparaging it for an eclectic mixture of a "futuristic gleam" with a "doggedly old-fashioned proposal." The New Yorker's architecture critic lampooned the building as "a gigantic donut." He described the project as "troubling" and "maybe even a bit scary," because it lacks functionality and human scale.

Following Jobs' presentation, city officials quickly voiced support for the project. Cupertino mayor Gilbert Wong said there was "no chance" the city would not approve the structure. Mayors of neighboring cities have also come out in favor of the project.

Proposed vehicle circulation, left; Proposed pedestrian circulation, right.

Assuming that Apple receives the necessary approvals, the company plans to break ground on the project next year and open the facility in 2015. The iPhone maker appears to have already budgeted increased capital expenses for the structure, as its projected expenses for fiscal 2012 have jumped up 72 percent year over year.











post #2 of 39
Now this is something I would travel to see. I wonder if they would let me have a picnic on the campus. Maybe even let my dog take a crap there. An Apple crap. I will feed him Macintosh Apples and he could take a dump by the walk path. But don't worry I will bring my popper scooper. I will smile and let the Apple execs know that I love my Apple products and therefor I will stay green man. Groovy with tie die and all.
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post #3 of 39
This one has an improved star drive and six shuttle bays.

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post #4 of 39
1) I ike the additional walking paths but think they still need more to utilize the open space.

2) I wonder if the move from a white roof to a grey roof is for thermal water-heating and/or solar paneling.

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post #5 of 39
Sad that Steve won't be there for the unveiling.
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post #6 of 39
Interesting that the critics hate the building that will become an instant icon and admired around the world.

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post #7 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

This one has an improved star drive and six shuttle bays.

LOL!

I was going to say it:

"That's no moon! It's a space station!!!"

Don't fall for the deception, boys and girls!

This is Isengard.
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post #8 of 39
They should put solar panels on this roof. Not using all this space is just a waste..
post #9 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by luinil View Post

They should put solar panels on this roof. Not using all this space is just a waste..

I completely agree.. and solar thermal, too
post #10 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

Sad that Steve won't be there for the unveiling.

My thoughts exactly. I miss you so much Steve.
post #11 of 39
It would be nice PR if it would turn out that the whole design has been carried out on Macs.
post #12 of 39
For all of Apple's talk of sustainability they seem to have no interest in integrating their campus with the surrounding community. It may be a secrecy thing, or it may be that they aren't genuinely interested in the concepts unless there's a product to market and sell. Regardless, it's a bit sad that they would forgo the opportunity to create something outsiders could also appreciate.
post #13 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecynicwithin View Post

For all of Apple's talk of sustainability they seem to have no interest in integrating their campus with the surrounding community. It may be a secrecy thing, or it may be that they aren't genuinely interested in the concepts unless there's a product to market and sell. Regardless, it's a bit sad that they would forgo the opportunity to create something outsiders could also appreciate.

What do you have in mind? It's pretty normal for tech companies to have insular campuses.
post #14 of 39
Given its size, I'd expect parking to be in several lots around the building, but i see only a large lot away from the building. Perhaps they have a PRT (personal rapid transit) system or shuttles? I also hope the roof will have solar power generation.
post #15 of 39
The roof does indeed have solar panels! That information is in the floor plans.
There were several modifications in the new plans. Actually almost every building is structurally changed (except for the main building).
post #16 of 39
I knew it! It's one of the alien motherships for the Greys! lol
post #17 of 39
I have read several articles on the new campus since Steve announced it, but I don't recall ever seeing a cost estimate.

Would anyone hazard a guess?

Along with that estimate, how many construction people would it employ.

Just wondering......
post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Interesting that the critics hate the building that will become an instant icon and admired around the world.

Of course they complain. Whenever a new building/structure goes up there's always a bunch of whiners complaining. Gotta get traffic somehow, and if you can't get the normal people to read your blog, you can always take the low road and go for the hater crowd.

Sort of like comedy. Some comedians have to resort to swearing and rude jokes about bodily functions while others actually come up with clever material.
post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeP View Post

Given its size, I'd expect parking to be in several lots around the building, but i see only a large lot away from the building. Perhaps they have a PRT (personal rapid transit) system or shuttles? I also hope the roof will have solar power generation.

Underground, I believe.
post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecynicwithin View Post

For all of Apple's talk of sustainability they seem to have no interest in integrating their campus with the surrounding community. It may be a secrecy thing, or it may be that they aren't genuinely interested in the concepts unless there's a product to market and sell. Regardless, it's a bit sad that they would forgo the opportunity to create something outsiders could also appreciate.

Enough with the violins, yer breaking my heart.

Companies (there's only one so far that I know of) whose business it is to change the world through revolutionary and enlightening products have to work in relative isolation -- secrecy, if you want -- like a skunk works, only a big one, and now in a building that encourages imagination on -- dare we say it -- a cosmic scale. The building embodies the Zen vision of Great Co-Founder Jobs.

They can do whatever they want with their glass laboratory, and if they don't want a nonstop parade of curious or even hostile outsiders, they can run tours on weekends or something. But I have a feeling that there will still be complainers about Apple's "cocoon." Get over yourself, I say. What does "sustainability" have to do with "integration with the surrounding community"? Same goes for the L.A. Times architecture critic, whose name I already forgot. If he'd said something real I might have remembered him.

We gotta do something about this snotty hostility to Apple, which will get worse the more visible and successful they become. I think it's the jealousy that goes with insecurity, but that's just offhand psychologizing.
post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecynicwithin View Post

For all of Apple's talk of sustainability they seem to have no interest in integrating their campus with the surrounding community. It may be a secrecy thing, or it may be that they aren't genuinely interested in the concepts unless there's a product to market and sell. Regardless, it's a bit sad that they would forgo the opportunity to create something outsiders could also appreciate.

Biased. Please point out any other corporate offices which are open to the public, as you ask for above.
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post #22 of 39
The original post has a video of the proceedings at the Cupertino City Council meet. It describes a lot of the ideas which were planned out, initially.
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post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecynicwithin View Post

For all of Apple's talk of sustainability they seem to have no interest in integrating their campus with the surrounding community. It may be a secrecy thing, or it may be that they aren't genuinely interested in the concepts unless there's a product to market and sell. Regardless, it's a bit sad that they would forgo the opportunity to create something outsiders could also appreciate.

Ah, I was wondering when the "human scale" nonsense would crop up.
post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feynman View Post

My thoughts exactly. I miss you so much Steve.

I'm sure that Steve is listening to you and cares about you.
post #25 of 39
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Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

I'm sure that Steve is listening to you and cares about you.

Your trolling is getting our of hand.

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post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecynicwithin View Post

For all of Apple's talk of sustainability they seem to have no interest in integrating their campus with the surrounding community. It may be a secrecy thing, or it may be that they aren't genuinely interested in the concepts unless there's a product to market and sell. Regardless, it's a bit sad that they would forgo the opportunity to create something outsiders could also appreciate.

I don't really know what you're talking about - the campus will have trees all around, lots of green, making it quieter for the neighbors. That's a lot better than being "integrated" right next to it.
post #27 of 39
This argument is perfectly indicative of Apple vs. any other company. Because it's different, because it's not a big square or rectangle, because it's unusual, critics don't like it. I know many a quadrilateral building that looks damn ugly, has poor use of space, and/or is not "user friendly." Geometry bigots!
post #28 of 39
If you look at page 7 of the A111104 document, it clearly shows that yes, they are putting a few solar panels on the roof.....

....and by a few (provided I counted and did the math correctly) I mean there'll be approx 20,160 of them.

The 6 regular office sections have 1392 on the outside and 1128 on the inside.

The area over the dining area is a little different, but I visually estimate they number to be close to the same.
post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeP View Post

Given its size, I'd expect parking to be in several lots around the building, but i see only a large lot away from the building. Perhaps they have a PRT (personal rapid transit) system or shuttles? I also hope the roof will have solar power generation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post

Underground, I believe.

Actually the parking on the bottom of the image (the parallelograms) is a large multi-story parking structure - it's one aspect of the design that's generated at least some critiques in the community; some people fear the parking structure will make a long "wall" along the 280. (Not to mention, make it impossible to see the spaceship from the freeway.)
post #30 of 39
I don't hate the new design, but as my earlier posts show I'm not a huge fan either; I think Apple could have done something a lot better. But in the end it's Apple's land and Apple's money.

Regardless, I'm definitely not convinced that the circle shape is going to be very workable in practice - for instance, take a look at the pedestrian circulation plans; there's a sidewalk around the outside of the building. Why would anyone walk around the outside (i.e., take a longer path) than enter the building and cut through a "slice", or at least walk an interior circle that's shorter than the exterior walk? I mean, if you're coming up from the parking lot at "6 o'clock" and work at "2 o'clock", walking around the exterior is inefficient.
post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierrajeff View Post

Actually the parking on the bottom of the image (the parallelograms) is a large multi-story parking structure - it's one aspect of the design that's generated at least some critiques in the community; some people fear the parking structure will make a long "wall" along the 280. (Not to mention, make it impossible to see the spaceship from the freeway.)

So what is visible from the freeway now? I don't remember much great scenery along there, but it's been a while since I passed through.

Here in L.A., many freeways are getting walls in order to quiet things down for the neighborhoods. I suspect this might be the thinking behind the parking structures, if they go much above the freeway banks. They will cut down noise for the Arcadia within, particularly from the sound of pileups caused by tourists rubbernecking to see the "spaceship." Actually, I seem to remember the freeway is sunk below street level there, please correct me if it's not so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierrajeff View Post

I don't hate the new design, but as my earlier posts show I'm not a huge fan either; I think Apple could have done something a lot better. But in the end it's Apple's land and Apple's money.

Regardless, I'm definitely not convinced that the circle shape is going to be very workable in practice - for instance, take a look at the pedestrian circulation plans; there's a sidewalk around the outside of the building. Why would anyone walk around the outside (i.e., take a longer path) than enter the building and cut through a "slice", or at least walk an interior circle that's shorter than the exterior walk? I mean, if you're coming up from the parking lot at "6 o'clock" and work at "2 o'clock", walking around the exterior is inefficient.

You must have a better idea then, c'mon let us have it. The circle is "not workable"? What's a better shape? Hint: don't give us anything rectilinear, because then you have corners, and corners waste space. It's where you put brooms and flagpoles when you're not using them. Rectilinear is now officially on the short list for obsolescence, thank Jobs.

The perimeter walk will be the way you get your exercise and clear your head, though I imagine people will need less head-clearing when they work in this building.
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) I ike the additional walking paths but think they still need more to utilize the open space.

2) I wonder if the move from a white roof to a grey roof is for thermal water-heating and/or solar paneling.

The notion that space must always be somehow utilized is what leads to the vast, barren office plazas that pockmark American downtowns like scars. The notion that "empty" space isn't good for anything is dubious at best, crippling at worst. Treating structures as a frame for empty space rather than dropping a few afterthought benches into the sterile desert surrounding a monolith has the potential to create both beauty and utility.

We aren't machines, and treating human beings as components to be plugged into a 30-story server has never improved the quality of life of anyone, anywhere.
post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbryanh View Post

The notion that space must always be somehow utilized is what leads to the vast, barren office plazas that pockmark American downtowns like scars. The notion that "empty" space isn't good for anything is dubious at best, crippling at worst. Treating structures as a frame for empty space rather than dropping a few afterthought benches into the sterile desert surrounding a monolith has the potential to create both beauty and utility.

We aren't machines, and treating human beings as components to be plugged into a 30-story server has never improved the quality of life of anyone, anywhere.

Your'e reading too much into my post. I don't expect the space to be utilized by some office plazas. Based on the scale I think some more paths should be created to allow for more trails throughout the open space.

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post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierrajeff View Post

I don't hate the new design, but as my earlier posts show I'm not a huge fan either; I think Apple could have done something a lot better. But in the end it's Apple's land and Apple's money.

Regardless, I'm definitely not convinced that the circle shape is going to be very workable in practice - for instance, take a look at the pedestrian circulation plans; there's a sidewalk around the outside of the building. Why would anyone walk around the outside (i.e., take a longer path) than enter the building and cut through a "slice", or at least walk an interior circle that's shorter than the exterior walk? I mean, if you're coming up from the parking lot at "6 o'clock" and work at "2 o'clock", walking around the exterior is inefficient.

I've a copy of an interesting study on my desk. It compares the time people were willing to spend searching for the parking space closest to a supermarket to their cardiovascular health. The researchers actually set up a conning tower in the parking lot, used cameras and software to track the paths of incoming cars, and offered drivers $25 to take a cardio stress test.

Predictably, they found that fit people were likely to part in the first open space they encountered, whereas the morbidly obese were prone to driving in circles for 10 minutes in hopes of finding a spot 20 feet closer to the door. Unhealthy people were far more likely to misuse handicapped spaces, and almost more likely to cause fender benders in their desire to be as sedentary as possible.

Given that, I think an ideal environment might deliberately put pleasant vistas, changes in light, air, & scene, chance encounters, cold drinks, and a half mile walk between every individual and the nearest bathroom. Sitting still is bad for individuals and bad for society. It leads to ugliness, self loathing, ill health, poor decisions, needless expense, and a shortened lifespan. In short, reducing the movement of human bodies leads to human misery.
post #35 of 39
The most notable change to the design of the main building are the enormous new horizontal sunshades/fins that were added at each floor line. These new fins will help shade all of those miles of glass curtainwall from direct sun. In the earlier design there would have been much more solar gain, which would have caused substantially more energy to be expended to cool the building. There also would have been lots of glare and direct sunshine on the occupants. This revised design is an improvement and a shift towards a more sustainable architecture.

The horizontal fins will also help break up the "mile-long wall of detail-less glass" appearance that I panned on this site previously. I am glad to see that Lord Norman Foster reads AppleInsider!

I wonder if Steve would have allowed the perfect, sleek objectification of the original design to be compromised in this way. I suspect not.

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post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

I'm sure that Steve is listening to you and cares about you.

How? People stop listening or caring or for that matter doing ANYTHING when their life terminates. Never heard of any exceptions to this rule.

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post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierrajeff View Post

I don't hate the new design, but as my earlier posts show I'm not a huge fan either; I think Apple could have done something a lot better. But in the end it's Apple's land and Apple's money.

Regardless, I'm definitely not convinced that the circle shape is going to be very workable in practice[...].

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

You must have a better idea then, c'mon let us have it. The circle is "not workable"? What's a better shape? Hint: don't give us anything rectilinear, because then you have corners, and corners waste space. It's where you put brooms and flagpoles when you're not using them. Rectilinear is now officially on the short list for obsolescence, thank Jobs.

Wow, get testy much? First, I clearly acknowledged that it's Apple's land and money to do with what they want. Second, I'm far from the first person to observe that it could be a real pain in the a** to have to go around the circle for inter-office interactions.

But what really is making me laugh out loud is your assertion that somehow this one circular building is going to make all other building shapes obsolete. Like there haven't been circular buildings before (for, oh, 2000 years - ever heard of the Pantheon in Rome?)... as it happens, our property system is rife with right angles and straight lines; for most companies, designing anything other than a rectilinear building on a rectilinear parcel is an inefficient waste of space. And that's going to continue to be the case, even after Apple's spaceship is built.
post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbryanh View Post

I've a copy of an interesting study on my desk. It compares the time people were willing to spend searching for the parking space closest to a supermarket to their cardiovascular health. The researchers actually set up a conning tower in the parking lot, used cameras and software to track the paths of incoming cars, and offered drivers $25 to take a cardio stress test.

Predictably, they found that fit people were likely to part in the first open space they encountered, whereas the morbidly obese were prone to driving in circles for 10 minutes in hopes of finding a spot 20 feet closer to the door. Unhealthy people were far more likely to misuse handicapped spaces, and almost more likely to cause fender benders in their desire to be as sedentary as possible.

Given that, I think an ideal environment might deliberately put pleasant vistas, changes in light, air, & scene, chance encounters, cold drinks, and a half mile walk between every individual and the nearest bathroom. Sitting still is bad for individuals and bad for society. It leads to ugliness, self loathing, ill health, poor decisions, needless expense, and a shortened lifespan. In short, reducing the movement of human bodies leads to human misery.

I don't disagree with any of that. (And FWIW, I tend to park wherever there's space and hoof it to the store, rather than waste time and gas circling endlessly.) But these arguments do not, by themselves, inherently support the circle design or the notion that people will circumnavigate the exterior of the building. I.e., there are a lot of ways to design a healthy building, and this proposal may, or may not, be a good implementation.
post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Interesting that the critics hate the building that will become an instant icon and admired around the world.

Ha. Indeed. Where have we seen this movie before!?
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