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Google's Schmidt predicts developers will prioritize Android over iOS in 6 months - Page 2

post #41 of 171
I don't know if this prediction will be true or not. What I do know is that there will be WAY more Android phones (all flavors) out there than IOS devices at some point if things keep going as they have been. If I were Apple I would be going for Google's jugular......search. Cut this mess off at the source. Siri is a great start, it bypasses Google and heads straight to Wolfram, Yelp or some other mature service. I'm sure they will be signing up more industry specific services as time goes on.
post #42 of 171
Sure...Never mind how many iPhones Apple sells..
post #43 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

It may be VERY easy for you, but the vast majority of iPhone users don't jailbreak. For them, it's easier to go to the App Store and pay their 99 cents. That's why the real money to be made is off of iOS.

This is probably true more often than we realize. Here's one data point. I was talking to my nephew over Thanksgiving - an Android fan, but contemplating a used iPhone to jailbreak.

I asked him exactly what it was that he wished to jailbreak the iPhone for, and he gave me a list of possibilities. Told him to go browse the App Store.

It wasn't even the end of the evening by when he had decided it was: (i) utterly pointless to be jailbreaking an iPhone; and (ii) perhaps time to jettison his Android phone (but his mom wouldn't allow him do it before the end of contract).
post #44 of 171
Speaking from a developers standpoint ... how exactly does Mr. Schmidt propose the fragmentation issue will be resolved in 6 months? Magic?

I develop for Android, but it's a MAJOR pain the a, because maintaining performance and user experience across all the various devices using the Android OS (not to mention the various iterations of the Android OS) is like trying to nail jell-o to a wall. It's lightyears easier, and more productive, to develop on the iOS platform.

I make a little bit off of Android ... just enough really to justify the effort. I make A LOT off of iOS devices, and it doesn't require a 10th of the effort.
post #45 of 171
Won't be happening at the design studio where I work. I'm booked solid for the next six moths doing nothing but iOS development. Android hasn't even been mentioned let alone considered.

As far as the tools comments go I agree, developing for Android is a bag of hurt. However, MonoDroid looks promising. I did an iOS app with Mono and it was ok, but not enough to make me move away from Xcode. It would be ironic that one of the better Android development tools ends up being based on a Microsoft technology.
post #46 of 171
You wont EVER catch me programming for Android!

I would rather gouge my eyes out with a skewer.
post #47 of 171
Not a chance. It doesn't matter how good the Android tools get or how many apps are downloaded. Android users just aren't willing to pay for apps in the same way that iOS users are.

I can understand prioritising development for Android if your app is free and it's just a conduit to other services. But if you actually want to sell your app for money, the Android Market is a dead loss.
post #48 of 171
I'm one of the biggest Apple fans in the world, I've been buying every generation of their products since 1980. And this all seems like "deja vu all over again." Every time Apple creates a great product, with plenty of awesome development tools (I've worked with many of them), and even programs to curate the user experience. But in the long run, they always come in a distant second place. Alone, they simply can't compete with an entire industry.

I don't believe Schmidt's time frame is right, but I really don't see why this ride around the carousel is going to be different from the last. iOS will live and thrive like the Mac, but in 1, 3, or 5 years I suspect a single company can't compete against the entire Android hardware development mob. iOs will become the 10% world-wide market share in hardware and applications will be forced to follow.

Downer I know, but history does tend to repeat itself.
post #49 of 171
Hasn't this topic already been beaten to death? Every few months someone somewhere (pundits, analist, CEO's) say Android is going to beat-up on iOS, but it hasn't happened yet.

Michael Dell's comment about shutting Apple down and giving money back to investors should be on every CEO's desk to remind them to refrain from making comments that will bite them in the ass, 6 months or even ten years from now.

Having said that, Schmidt wasn't going to call Android a PoS, was he? He needs to big-it-up to benefit from the ad revenue-stream. I know a number of people who got multiple Android handsets on the cheap, and most of them are sitting in drawers unused or flogged-off on fleabay or at car-boot markets -- either an easy way to make a bit of cash at the expense of the network or a sure sign of buyer's remorse.
post #50 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrmtrk View Post

I don't believe Schmidt's time frame is right, but I really don't see why this ride around the carousel is going to be different from the last. iOS will live and thrive like the Mac, but in 1, 3, or 5 years I suspect a single company can't compete against the entire Android hardware development mob. iOs will become the 10% world-wide market share in hardware and applications will be forced to follow.

TBH I think Apple acknowledges that. You can't dominate a whole market with a small range of premium-priced products. But Apple's profit margins are so large compared to other hardware manufacturers, and their software ecosystem is so compelling, that market share ceases to matter too much. It's no good having the majority of the market if you're making $5 on each device.
post #51 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrmtrk View Post

I'm one of the biggest Apple fans in the world, I've been buying every generation of their products since 1980. And this all seems like "deja vu all over again." Every time Apple creates a great product, with plenty of awesome development tools (I've worked with many of them), and even programs to curate the user experience. But in the long run, they always come in a distant second place. Alone, they simply can't compete with an entire industry.

I don't believe Schmidt's time frame is right, but I really don't see why this ride around the carousel is going to be different from the last. iOS will live and thrive like the Mac, but in 1, 3, or 5 years I suspect a single company can't compete against the entire Android hardware development mob. iOs will become the 10% world-wide market share in hardware and applications will be forced to follow.

Downer I know, but history does tend to repeat itself.

'Downer' for whom?

Not for most of us here....
post #52 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post

My headlight fluid refill company has 10 trillion shares, with each share worth 0 cents.

If it's all about volume, then I'm the largest company in the world.


Good Point!
post #53 of 171
If Google would overhaul their app store and make it work more like Apple's, then Android app development could be profitable.

Right now there's just no money in it. You just don't make back your development cost.

Even if every dumb phone user switched to Androind, that wouldn't change the fact that all of the mobile app revenue would still be in the iOS space. Google needs to take simple steps to make app sales better for developer. The ball is in Google's court.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

There'll be lots of comments about how Android is unprofitable for developers and such. Whatever. All this talk is reminiscent of all the threads that said Android would never ever outsell the iPhone (and later when the goalpost moved iOS). Even the supporting arguments have changed. It used to be that nobody would ever want or buy an Android device. Now the argument is that those who buy thme are cheapskates. I'm probably missing a few more stereotypes in here. Others will add them I'm sure.
post #54 of 171
If I squint my eyes just right, Mr. Schmidt starts to look like Mr. Ballmer.
post #55 of 171
I predict that Android will buy out Apple and Apple will then buy Android and then they will sell each other and then develop apps with each other then sell the apps to one another then........
An Apple man since 1977
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An Apple man since 1977
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post #56 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrmtrk View Post

I'm one of the biggest Apple fans in the world, I've been buying every generation of their products since 1980. And this all seems like "deja vu all over again." Every time Apple creates a great product, with plenty of awesome development tools (I've worked with many of them), and even programs to curate the user experience. But in the long run, they always come in a distant second place. Alone, they simply can't compete with an entire industry.

I don't believe Schmidt's time frame is right, but I really don't see why this ride around the carousel is going to be different from the last. iOS will live and thrive like the Mac, but in 1, 3, or 5 years I suspect a single company can't compete against the entire Android hardware development mob. iOs will become the 10% world-wide market share in hardware and applications will be forced to follow.

Downer I know, but history does tend to repeat itself.

... and I predict that Android will actually start losing market share by this time next year.

iOS might not end up the dominant OS... but I sure as hell don't see it at 10% in 5 years or even 10 years. I see iOS taking at least 30% of the mobile OS market in 5 years time with WinMobile not that far behind... leaving Android with the rest.

The tide will turn... but not the way that Eric is predicting.
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post #57 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avpub View Post

I always appreciate these predictions from tech industry heavyweights. All we have to do is file them away for future reference and later enjoyment when typically, they prove to be simply posturing. As well, doesn't it always seem like the tech wannabes always have to bad mouth Apple when their own products don't deliver? So much envy, so little maturity. Eric really should know better - it's not just about how many you sold, but the amount of profit you get on each sale. Same is true for mobile developers; they'll always go where the money is for them. Just the usual PR spin for the "folks".

It's not posturing, he's telling outright lies to the media - and to his customers. Shame on you Eric Schmidt.

Funny, CEO Steve Jobs never used to make fake predictions and tell outright lies to the media and his customers, at least I can't think of any.
post #58 of 171
I can't see why any developer of a paid app would target Android first, if at all.

Free app developers, on the other hand, target the largest user base that's likely to download and use their apps. More eyes equals more ad impressions and/or more sales.

But convincing someone to download, install and run your app isn't easy. The average number of apps on a phone is really quite low and I believe the Android figure is lower than the iOS one. Then there's the whole issue of whether or not your app supports the version of Android that users have.

Which OS version to target?
Phones still under contract run 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 and 4.0.
The majority of Android phones are never updated from the OS they shipped with.
Developing for older OSs involves trade-offs that can make your app less appealing and multiplies the testing effort.
Developing for new OSs leaves millions of users unable to run your app.

Which manufacturers/carriers to support?
Every manufacturer has its own UI layer and selection of hardware buttons
Hundreds of carriers around the world have exclusive phones, exclusive software, etc.

What screen size to target?
Phones available for sale today range from the minuscule 240x320 all the way up to 720x1280.
If your whole UI fits into 240x320 it's going to look like crap on many larger screens.
If your UI needs more than 240x320 then it's going to get cut off on small phones.

What screen ratio to target?
Phones available for sale today come in 4 different screen ratios from 1.33 to 1.778.
No matter what shape you target your UI will be stretched/compressed/cropped on a lot of phones.
post #59 of 171
I'm sure that Schmidt is just saying what he'd like to see happen (he can't really be blamed for that). However, if this is based upon some internal estimate by Google then I think they need to find some new analysts.
post #60 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by wattsup View Post

I'm sure that Schmidt is just saying what he'd like to see happen (he can't really be blamed for that).

Exactly.

"SHOCKING NEWS; Chairman talking up his own company"
post #61 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

There'll be lots of comments about how Android is unprofitable for developers and such. Whatever. All this talk is reminiscent of all the threads that said Android would never ever outsell the iPhone (and later when the goalpost moved iOS). Even the supporting arguments have changed. It used to be that nobody would ever want or buy an Android device. Now the argument is that those who buy thme are cheapskates. I'm probably missing a few more stereotypes in here. Others will add them I'm sure.

I dunno if Schmidt is right, but I would certainly like to see some balance. More devleopers being platform agnostic would be nice. As a consumer, I don't really like having to buy certain hardware just to run certain software. I'd hope that some day they go one step further and allow somebody who bought an app on iOS to get the same app free on Android or vice versa (iTunes Match for apps?).

Why should you expect that ? If you buy MS Office for a PC, should you expect to get a free copy if you switch to a Mac ?
post #62 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesmoth View Post

The reality is actually opposite to what you say in this post. For iOS, it's VERY easy to pirate apps. All you have to do is jailbreak and get installous and you're laughing. You can get any app, no problem, and work almost always.

With android, you have to try and hunt down apps on torrent websites, with most of them not being available, and when they are, most of the time they don't work (formatted for a different CPU/GPU, different resolution, etc.).

So with android, I actually buy a lot of apps because I have no choice, but with iOS the story is different.

I was talking about apps, not music.

/sarcasm

Piracy is of little concern, because a small percentage jailbreak, and a smaller percentage use installous, and a smaller percentage have the ethical flexibility to steal apps.

The problem that we are discussing here is that nobody buys android apps in the first place.
post #63 of 171
Its nice to get a clear unbiased statement from someone with no stake in any of this. Well since he stated it, obviously it must be true. Time to sell that iphone now.
post #64 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

... and I predict that Android will actually start losing market share by this time next year.

iOS might not end up the dominant OS... but I sure as hell don't see it at 10% in 5 years or even 10 years. I see iOS taking at least 30% of the mobile OS market in 5 years time with WinMobile not that far behind... leaving Android with the rest.

The tide will turn... but not the way that Eric is predicting.

I'm interested to know - why Windows Phone 7. It's not exactly setting the world alight right now. Is Microsoft going to pull off a deus ex machina and suddenly gain a load of marketshare or is this wishful thinking? It's looking increasingly tough for Microsoft to gain the mindshare needed to make the product matter, especially when the Verizon rep is going to steer the customer towards their branded Droid handset. Although Windows 8 could change things.

I do admit I like to play devil's advocate, but I'm of the opinion that Android truly is a rushed product. Interesting that they were rushing to beat Apple, when really all they had to do was beat Microsoft. They could have spent an extra year or two developing the thing and still would have beat them to market. They could have avoided the lawsuits and maybe even thought things through properly (i.e. addressed issues like fragmentation and lag before putting it out). Missed opportunity.
post #65 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

It may (not) be very easy for you (to believe), but the vast majority of jailbreakers don't pirate

Excellent point. On top of that, In order to steal it, you have to find somebody who bought it in the first place, Who also has the ethical flexibility to allow you to steal it.

this all belies the fact that the app was purchased in the first place. My whole point is that all the data shows that people spend money on iOS much more freely than they do on android
post #66 of 171
Schmidt and monkey boy Ballmer need to get together and procreate. That's an outcome we could make money off of.

And, it is feasible!
OMG here we go again...
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OMG here we go again...
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post #67 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Google Chairman Eric Schmidt has said he believes mobile developers will prioritize the Android platform over Apple's iOS in the next six month...

He said he believes the high volume of Android shipments, which has given Google the largest share of worldwide smartphone sales, will win over developers...

"Ultimately, application vendors are driven by volume, and volume is favored by the open approach Google is taking," Schmidt said. "There are so many manufacturers working to deliver Android phones globally. Whether you like Android or not, you will support that platform, and maybe you'll even deliver it first."

After one audience member complained that mobile applications frequently appear on Apple's iOS App Store first, Schmidt then went on to predict that six months from now the roles will be reversed. He said he believes Android 4.0, known by its code name Ice Cream Sandwich, will put Android in the leadership position for application developers.

While Android may be leading in current activations, one category where it lags behind Apple is developer revenue. One study publicized last month estimated that Apple's iOS platform takes in about 90 percent of all dollars spent on mobile devices, while Google's Android market has generated about 7 percent of the gross revenue of the iOS App Store.

Earlier this year, Canalys estimated that mobile application stores will top $14 billion in direct revenue in 2012. While the volume of applications downloaded on Android is expected to surpass the iOS App Store, iOS is expected to generate $2.86 billion in application revenue by 2016, compared to just $1.5 billion on Android.

Schmidt also revealed on Wednesday that about 200 million Android phones have been activated to date, and 550,000 new devices are activated daily. In comparison, Apple executives revealed in October that sales of iOS devices, which include the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, surpassed a quarter of a billion last quarter.

Schmidt also reportedly declined to comment on whether Google's Android has copied iOS features. But he did state that "Android was founded before the iPhone was."

Development of Android began before Apple introduced the iPhone, when the mobile operating system was seen as a challenger to the then-market-leading Research in Motion BlackBerry lineup. But changes to Android, including the addition of a touch-centric interface, led Apple co-founder Steve Jobs to accuse Google of stealing from iOS. Jobs said to biographer Walter Isaacson that he would spend his "last dying breath" fighting Android, as he believed it was a "stolen product."

post #68 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robodude View Post

I'm interested to know - why Windows Phone 7. It's not exactly setting the world alight right now. Is Microsoft going to pull off a deus ex machina and suddenly gain a load of marketshare or is this wishful thinking? It's looking increasingly tough for Microsoft to gain the mindshare needed to make the product matter, especially when the Verizon rep is going to steer the customer towards their branded Droid handset. Although Windows 8 could change things.

I do admit I like to play devil's advocate, but I'm of the opinion that Android truly is a rushed product. Interesting that they were rushing to beat Apple, when really all they had to do was beat Microsoft. They could have spent an extra year or two developing the thing and still would have beat them to market. They could have avoided the lawsuits and maybe even thought things through properly (i.e. addressed issues like fragmentation and lag before putting it out). Missed opportunity.

Oh... I don't think that Mango will be the one but remember, I'm talking about a 5 year window and MS still has a huge presence in the enterprise market. The early 80s is a good example. IBM had basically been left behind in the personal computer market in the 70s but its presence in the enterprise market made its Jr. a darling in the market and the other company with the funny name was left in the dust from that point forward (there are other factors, of course). As much as I don't take too much stock in surveys, there are polls that have been taken showing that people are waiting for a Windows phone.

Android is gaining the market share battle by sheer numbers, hardware specs and a lot of spiffs. Smaller companies love android for development because they don't have to go through the Apple circus. The more small companies that make a one off app for their company, the more Android has a chance of gaining mind share.

Regardless of the seeming insurmountable lead in market share by Android at present one must remember how they got there. They depend on multiple vendors. MS has the muscle to convince vendors to hedge their bets and if MS can come up with an even more credible OS in the next couple of years then I believe they have a good chance to push forward in the market. Vendors go to the money. ... and the public can be very gullible... as witnessed, imho, by the success of Android.
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post #69 of 171
Quote:
"There are so many manufacturers working to deliver Android phones globally. Whether you like Android or not, you will support that platform, and maybe you'll even deliver it first."

HO boy. This is Schmidt's Microsoft Moment. And by that, I mean this is how Microsoft slid into stagnation and mediocrity. We don't have to ever improve. We don't have to be hungry. We don't have to be reaching relentlessly for better. Windows is everywhere, and whether you like it or not, you will support that platform.

I don't think we're quite there yet with Android. Back in October, John Carmack of id Software was asked about an Android port of Rage, and Carmack's reply was basically, show me where other game developers have made any real money off Android, or something to that effect. He saw no clear business case to pursue it.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #70 of 171
Oh Google, you just don't get it, do you?

MacBook Pro 15" | Intel Core2 Duo 2.66GHz | 320GB HDD | OS X v10.9
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White iPhone 6 | 64GB | On 3UK

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MacBook Pro 15" | Intel Core2 Duo 2.66GHz | 320GB HDD | OS X v10.9
Black/Space Grey iPad Air with Wi-Fi & LTE | 128GB | On 4GEE
White iPhone 6 | 64GB | On 3UK

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post #71 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by ron1701 View Post

Why should you expect that ? If you buy MS Office for a PC, should you expect to get a free copy if you switch to a Mac ?

No. However, if MS were to do what Adobe apparently does, i.e., let you cross-upgrade at the upgrade price something many are not aware of, a lot of die hard PC-Office users would love to be able to do.
post #72 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrmtrk View Post

I'm one of the biggest Apple fans in the world, I've been buying every generation of their products since 1980. And this all seems like "deja vu all over again." Every time Apple creates a great product, with plenty of awesome development tools (I've worked with many of them), and even programs to curate the user experience. But in the long run, they always come in a distant second place. Alone, they simply can't compete with an entire industry.

I don't believe Schmidt's time frame is right, but I really don't see why this ride around the carousel is going to be different from the last. iOS will live and thrive like the Mac, but in 1, 3, or 5 years I suspect a single company can't compete against the entire Android hardware development mob. iOs will become the 10% world-wide market share in hardware and applications will be forced to follow.

Downer I know, but history does tend to repeat itself.

why are you overlooking the iPod? It dominated and continues to dominate the MP3 player market. Apple's current market share looks a heck of a lot more like iPod than it ever did for Macintosh. Here's the october mobile market share chart.



Not quite what we've been led to believe, huh? Because it includes all iOS devices instead of just restricting things to the area Android has moved lots of units by mostly giving them away. Of course, this chart reflects people actually using their devices vs simply having bought one.
post #73 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuzDots View Post

Schmidt and monkey boy Ballmer need to get together and procreate. That's an outcome we could make money off of.



Well, making money is the only thing giant corporations like MicroSoft and Google care about!
post #74 of 171
The real future for many applications on all the platforms lies instead in hybrid apps. Which is an app wrapping a browser interface and HTML5 will provide the interactivity. This provides the immediacy and convenience of an installed app but simplifies the app development and updating process - you're customers are always on the latest version. Only apps requiring true native hardware access (mainly games) will be native apps.
post #75 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Beige View Post


post #76 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by sip View Post

Hasn't this topic already been beaten to death? Every few months someone somewhere (pundits, analist, CEO's) say Android is going to beat-up on iOS, but it hasn't happened yet.

Actually, it has. But the arguments AppleInsider posters continue to make keep changing. Many here argued Android would never outsell iPhone. Well, that happened. It's only a matter of time before the Android Market is larger than the iTunes store. It may not happen in 6 months, but it will happen eventually.
post #77 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robodude View Post

I'm interested to know - why Windows Phone 7. It's not exactly setting the world alight right now. Is Microsoft going to pull off a deus ex machina and suddenly gain a load of marketshare or is this wishful thinking? It's looking increasingly tough for Microsoft to gain the mindshare needed to make the product matter, especially when the Verizon rep is going to steer the customer towards their branded Droid handset. Although Windows 8 could change things.

I do admit I like to play devil's advocate, but I'm of the opinion that Android truly is a rushed product. Interesting that they were rushing to beat Apple, when really all they had to do was beat Microsoft. They could have spent an extra year or two developing the thing and still would have beat them to market. They could have avoided the lawsuits and maybe even thought things through properly (i.e. addressed issues like fragmentation and lag before putting it out). Missed opportunity.

I agree that Microsoft Windows Phones will steal market share from Google Android phones though perhaps not 30% of market share in one year.

1. Most consumers appear to not care about which operating system they use with the exception of Apple consumers.
2. While Microsoft Windows Phone isn't aesthetically pleasing to me I do like some of the features available and although those features aren't exceptional enough for me to desire the phones I do hope Apple is considering Microsoft a serious competitor.
3. While we (Apple faithful) like to believe that Apple corners the market on consumer retention, Microsoft does have their adherents and a broad, if poorly integrated, ecosystem (Bing, Internet Explorer, Xbox Live, Zune). In fact, if Microsoft were willing to have a consistent product naming convention and tightly integrate their services they could be a real competitor to Apple.
4. Nokia is still one of the largest phone manufacturers with an unrivaled presence in Europe.
5. Beyond Nokia, other vendors may prefer Microsoft if Microsoft can resolve the issues plaguing Google. Microsoft has had plenty of time to consider those issues and develop an approach that avoids those issues.
post #78 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Beige View Post

Funny, CEO Steve Jobs never used to make fake predictions and tell outright lies to the media and his customers, at least I can't think of any.

Actually, he did. Confirmation bias: you only remember what supports your arguments.

Check this article, just one of many. Steve Jobs told many lies, exaggerations, and half-truths, just as any other CEO does.

Steve Jobs' reality distortion takes its toll on truth
http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2011/03/...toll-on-truth/
post #79 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

Regardless of the seeming insurmountable lead in market share by Android at present one must remember how they got there. They depend on multiple vendors. MS has the muscle to convince vendors to hedge their bets and if MS can come up with an even more credible OS in the next couple of years then I believe they have a good chance to push forward in the market. Vendors go to the money. ... and the public can be very gullible... as witnessed, imho, by the success of Android.

I'd correct that statement and say carriers. While the iPhone took power away from the carriers (aside from the whole exclusivity thing over in the US), Android put it right back in. You could say, they made a deal with the devil to gain a foothold in the market. Android could possibly have still been a bit player if not for Verizon's huge marketing push with the Droid campaign.

I'm also not sure that the market will be as split as people make out. Apple and Samsung are the only companies showing growth in profits. HTC had a bad year (forecasts down this quarter) and may have lost their mojo. Sooner or later companies are going to drop out of the smartphone race (RIMM, Nokia and LG to name a few). Could be like the iPod market.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macbook Pro

I agree that Microsoft Windows Phones will steal market share from Google Android phones though perhaps not 30% of market share in one year.

1. Most consumers appear to not care about which operating system they use with the exception of Apple consumers. Exactly - they'll buy what the sales rep in the store tells them to, which is Androids with LTE, 4G, dual-core and support for more than one screen resolution. Microsoft have a lot of ground to make up
2. While Microsoft Windows Phone isn't aesthetically pleasing to me I do like some of the features available and although those features aren't exceptional enough for me to desire the phones I do hope Apple is considering Microsoft a serious competitor.
3. While we (Apple faithful) like to believe that Apple corners the market on consumer retention, Microsoft does have their adherents and a broad, if poorly integrated, ecosystem (Bing, Internet Explorer, Xbox Live, Zune). In fact, if Microsoft were willing to have a consistent product naming convention and tightly integrate their services they could be a real competitor to Apple. Yes, but we know Microsoft has poor execution. So how will they steal all this marketshare from Android again?
4. Nokia is still one of the largest phone manufacturers with an unrivaled presence in Europe. Agreed, but they're on a downward spiral, which will be hard to recover from.
5. Beyond Nokia, other vendors may prefer Microsoft if Microsoft can resolve the issues plaguing Google. Microsoft has had plenty of time to consider those issues and develop an approach that avoids those issues.The majority of which can't even turn a profit using a 'free' OS. Why would they pay Microsoft?

I don't think Microsoft haven't been able to apply what they've learnt so far. It seems quite a few proponents of Windows Phones are Apple fans who wouldn't buy the product regardless. I also think, until Windows 8 comes out, their departure from a 'traditional' interface isn't doing them any favours.
post #80 of 171
How is Ice Cream sandwich going to solve all the problems developers have with the platform? Is there something I don't know? Is it going to eliminate fragmentation, remove security holes, create a decent app store, and cause people who buy apps to flock to the platform? Android attracts people who want a better phone, but not people who want to run apps. If this ever changes it will be much farther out then 6 monthes. Besides, who will target the new SDK if they want to also support the Kindle Fire. That at least has a little greater chance of attracting someone who might buy an app. Unfortunately the Fire is designed to run smartphone apps and not tablet apps which will likely limit selection to just games. The graphics performance of the fire will limit it to mostly casual games. Mobile gamers will still choose the iPad or iPhone over anything else out there.
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