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141 arrested in stolen iPhone, iPad sting in New York

post #1 of 36
Thread Starter 
A recent New York Police Department sting, in which undercover officers offered stolen iPhone 4 and iPad 2 units, netted a total of 141 arrests.

The officers clearly stated to New York City merchants that the Apple devices were stolen before they agreed to prices between $50 and $200, NYPD spokesman Paul Browne told the New York Post. Clerks and workers at a number of businesses, including barbershops, supermarkets, and pawn shops, were arrested in the sting.

"That's our intention, to reduce the places where people who steal these things can go and sell them," NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly reportedly said. "If someone is offering you an iPad for way below market value, you have to realize that it's most likely stolen."

Most arrests came from Brooklyn, where 42 people were charged. Another 41 were arrested in Manhattan, 31 in the Bronx, 21 in Queens, and 6 on Staten Island.

The businesses were targeted after the police spoke with prisoners already in custody. Those prisoners shared locations where they were selling stolen goods.

Police also cautioned that civilians should avoid showing off their smartphone in public. One source told the Post that "walking around with a cellphone is like walking around with a $500 bill," inviting theft.
post #2 of 36
They would have had zero arrests if they were peddling Playbooks.
post #3 of 36
Wut...
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post #4 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by katastroff View Post

They would have had zero arrests if they were peddling Playbooks.

I think I'd rather be arrested for stealing an iPad than not be arrested for stealing a PlayBook.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #5 of 36
Isn't this just entrapment? They would be better off looking for and catching thieves rather that people that buy stolen goods at bargain prices when they are offered them, that would be half of the population I'd imagine. Although I can see going after fences is a good idea if this is all they were doing. I guess they may even get names of regular thieves in plea bargains. Ok I retract maybe a good idea ...
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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post #6 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Clerks and workers at a number of businesses, including barbershops, supermarkets, and pawn shops, were arrested in the sting.

Pawn Shops I understand, but barbershops and supermarkets? How do those fall under the category of:

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

...places where people who steal these things can go and sell them...

I suspect there were a handful of pawn shop workers in those 141 arrests, but the majority were minimum-wage stock boys at grocery stores who thought they were getting a sweet deal on an iPad or iPhone. Arresting them does nothing to diminish the number of places where stolen goods can be sold, because these are not places where iPads and iPhones are sold. These people would have likely never bought the stolen goods had the undercover officer not approached them with such a great deal, and they sure weren't going to turn around and resell the stolen goods in their stores.
post #7 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Police also cautioned that civilians should avoid showing off their smartphone in public. One source told the Post that "walking around with a cellphone is like walking around with a $500 bill," inviting theft.

That's sad that police are basically telling everyone in NYC that using your smart phone in public is begging to be robbed. Glad I live in a nice quiet neighborhood.
post #8 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by techguy911 View Post

That's sad that police are basically telling everyone in NYC that using your smart phone in public is begging to be robbed. Glad I live in a nice quiet neighborhood.

You also shouldn't drive, because it's like going around town with $25,000 in a briefcase, just asking to be car-jacked. Shame on you.
post #9 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Isn't this just entrapment? They would be better off looking for and catching thieves rather that people that buy stolen goods at bargain prices when they are offered them, that would be half of the population I'd imagine. Although I can see going after fences is a good idea if this is all they were doing. I guess they may even get names of regular thieves in plea bargains. Ok I retract maybe a good idea ...

It does fit the description of entrapment. All depends on if a NYC judge will agree.
post #10 of 36
I can't see how this is anything but entrapment. Hey there minimum wage worker in the most expensive city in the USA, have I got deal for you! This reeks of injustice.
post #11 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by techguy911 View Post

It does fit the description of entrapment. All depends on if a NYC judge will agree.

It's not entrapment. The cops clearly stated they were about to commit a crime. The buyers chose to do so of their own free will, and understood they were commiting said crime.

I only have issue with the bait.

When some crackhead stops me on a sidewalk to sell my a mountainbike for 20$ for his next shot, I decline. (it's happened)

If he'd offer me an iPhone..... well....

Anyway, these were known "recyclers" they were going after.
post #12 of 36
meanwhile - it is hard to sell "Free" Android devices.

Here - want to buy this stolen merchandise - that clearly has a resale value.

Hmm - well, <b>I</b> didn't steal it - so it must be okay.

Were the products intact stolen? if not then the undercover agents were lying, if so then the agents should be arrested

As to entrapment - it seems to me that there is a difference between me actively going out and seeking something - whether it be drugs, or sex, or stolen goods - and someone approaching me and making the offer.

Perhaps not enough of a difference in terms of whether or not I committed a crime or not - but certainly in terms of whether I set out with intent to commit the crime. Sort of like the difference between homicide and involuntary manslaughter.

In this particular case - it may be that these individuals were already suspected or under some sort of surveillance - not that the undercover agents just wandered around looking for people to pick on.
post #13 of 36
This is not entrapment.

If somebody offers to sell you something that is stated to be stolen and you accept, then you are a filthy criminal and you are committing a crime.

The cops are smart too. If they'd have offered stolen Android phones instead, they wouldn't have been able to make many arrests as they would have been laughed out of the store and possibly beaten up for even suggesting such a stupid thing.
post #14 of 36
Kelly said undercover officers tried to make 600 sales; 141 people took the bait and were arrested

That's a high ratio of scumbags out of 600. Those 141 criminals deserve to be behind bars.
post #15 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Pawn Shops I understand, but barbershops and supermarkets? How do those fall under the category of:



I suspect there were a handful of pawn shop workers in those 141 arrests, but the majority were minimum-wage stock boys at grocery stores who thought they were getting a sweet deal on an iPad or iPhone. Arresting them does nothing to diminish the number of places where stolen goods can be sold, because these are not places where iPads and iPhones are sold. These people would have likely never boughten the stolen goods had the undercover officer not approached them with such a great deal, and they sure weren't going to turn around and resell the stolen goods in their stores.

Everytime I go on Fridays to get my haircut in Spanish Harlem someone almost always walks in selling something ie. the Asian woman selling the counterfeit DVD's and they even walk rightup to you in the restuarant while you are eating and pull out the bogus DVDs and dudes always walk in selling something stolen... But if you live a decent area of course u won't see this but in he urban areas in NYC yes it happens
post #16 of 36
Waste of taxpayers money.

Go after more important things than Apple stuff.

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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post #17 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Go after more important things than Apple stuff.

What could possibly be more important than Apple stuff?

iPhones and iPads are the most lucrative items around, even for thieves.
post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

What could possibly be more important than Apple stuff?

iPhones and iPads are the most lucrative items around, even for thieves.

Plenty of stuff.

Drugs are the first things that comes to my mind.

Dont be so naive.

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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post #19 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Plenty of stuff.

Drugs are the first things that comes to my mind.

Dont be so naive.

Now, drugs is definitely a waste of taxdollars to go after, especially weed.

There's a reason why drugs like weed is decriminalized in NY and buying stolen items is not.

Whether you like it or not, Apple items are highly sought after and it makes perfect sense to go after criminals dealing in such stolen items.
post #20 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by techguy911 View Post

It does fit the description of entrapment. All depends on if a NYC judge will agree.

Not entrapment if they were told by the police that they were buying stolen property. Law abiding folk would have just said "no thanks". These people were thieves as well.
post #21 of 36
They work hard for the money. If you are cut off from success through legal means, you will use illegal means. Highly negotiable items should never be waved around in public places. NY city is one place where there are more dishonest people than honest ones. I couldn't buy a knock off Gucci purse any where near where I live, in NY on trips, I trip over them.
post #22 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowhide View Post

NY city is one place where there are more dishonest people than honest ones. I couldn't buy a knock off Gucci purse any where near where I live, in NY on trips, I trip over them.

That's a ridiculous statement. NYC is among the large cities with the least amount of crime. There are 10 cities in the U.S. with more than 1 million people. All stats are per capita.
Violent Crime: NYC is 3rd (1st being the least crime)
Murder: NYC is 3rd from the least
Rape: NYC has the least.
Robbery: NYC is 4th from the least
Aggravated Assault: NYC is 5th from the least
Property Crime: NYC has the least
Burglary: NYC has the least
Larceny/Theft: NYC has the least
Car Theft: NYC has the least.

There are 74 cities with populations over 200,000. NYC is right in the middle at #27 (#1 is the least) in violent crime. The least is Plano, Texas. The most is Detroit, Michigan. (Note that the stats I looked at didn't have a violent crime stat for Chicago.) Tampa, Fresno, Boston, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Tulsa, Kansas City, and St. Paul (among others) all have higher violent crime rates than New York City.

As far as Gucci knockoffs are concerned, while I will admit that in most cases it is a copyright violation, no who buys a Gucci knockoff for $10-$20 thinks they're buying a real Gucci. And I would think few people who buy a knockoff could afford a Gucci, so there's no loss to Gucci. And you know there is no copyright for fashion. The violation is only on the logo. If it doesn't have a Gucci logo, it's totally legal. The fact is that the street vendors who sell this stuff pay for their goods and make a legitimate living. (Whether they report their earnings is another matter.)
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowhide View Post

They work hard for the money. If you are cut off from success through legal means, you will use illegal means. Highly negotiable items should never be waved around in public places. NY city is one place where there are more dishonest people than honest ones. I couldn't buy a knock off Gucci purse any where near where I live, in NY on trips, I trip over them.

Can't trust'em big city folk?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #24 of 36
(Duplicate)
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by mazimoyo View Post

Not entrapment if they were told by the police that they were buying stolen property. Law abiding folk would have just said "no thanks". These people were thieves as well.

Yeah, fair enough. But these are pretty small fish, right?
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

The cops are smart too. If they'd have offered stolen Android phones instead, they wouldn't have been able to make many arrests as they would have been laughed out of the store and possibly beaten up for even suggesting such a stupid thing.

Yeah, that would've instantly blown their cover! I can't help picturing Robert De Niro... At his "restaurant", with napkin and all. Say this in his voice, it's fun:

"You come to me? You come all the way here, into my reputable place of business, interrupt my lovely dinner with my lady friend, and you, whoever the fukk you are... try to sell me some sorry ass Korean crap? Geddafukkouttahere... before I make you geddafukkouttahere. Boys!" *snaps fingers*

(With apologies to Italian Americans)
post #27 of 36
I say well done to police department.
Those people who are defending/complaining of the string operation will sing a different tune if their smartphone or tablet is stolen. It don't matter if you are a buyer of stolen property, you are still encouraging stealing.
Think about a society where no one buys stolen property. Why will theft occur then?

Now is the time to start a campaign against ebay to stop listing stolen property.
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by katastroff View Post

It's not entrapment. The cops clearly stated they were about to commit a crime. The buyers chose to do so of their own free will, and understood they were commiting said crime.

I only have issue with the bait.

When some crackhead stops me on a sidewalk to sell my a mountainbike for 20$ for his next shot, I decline. (it's happened)

If he'd offer me an iPhone..... well....

Anyway, these were known "recyclers" they were going after.

The police solicited them to commit the crime, the definition of entrapment. Police can't do that.
post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post

The police solicited them to commit the crime, the definition of entrapment. Police can't do that.

No it's not. Entrapment is when the subject would have not have otherwise acted in an illegal capacity.

This is where you'd argue that without setting up the sting these subjects would not have acted in this specific instance, but a sting is devised in such a way that the subject is well aware of the illegal activity and has a clear choice whether to engage in said activity.

If you have been arrested and feel you did not have any freedom to choose you could claim entrapment. An example of this might be you feeling like your life was in jeopardy if you didn't commit the crime but you'd have to instill such doubt.

It's simply not an argument to say all stings are entrapment.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Now, drugs is definitely a waste of taxdollars to go after, especially weed.

There's a reason why drugs like weed is decriminalized in NY and buying stolen items is not.

Whether you like it or not, Apple items are highly sought after and it makes perfect sense to go after criminals dealing in such stolen items.

Stupidest thing I've heard all month.

Stolen property can be replaced or recovered.

Cost of human lives in the ecosystem of the drug market can not be replaced.

Yes, there are some human casualties even in stolen goods, however, that isnt ALWAYS the case.

Drugs are a different matter, however.

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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post #31 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Stupidest thing I've heard all month.

You think we should go after pot smokers?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #32 of 36
I was in Washington DC many years ago - and some guy came up to us offering a box of Maxell cassette tapes for something like a third of the price for the same product at retail.

I used to work in retail - LOTS of stuff gets taken out of the store without being paid for - a lot of it ends up at flea markets with the original store price sticker still on it.
post #33 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

You think we should go after pot smokers?

Yes, because the drugs are tainted with human blood, figuratively.

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Yes, because the drugs are tainted with human blood, figuratively.

1) It's cannabis sativa not cannibalis hematoma. (see what I did there?)

2) You're ridiculous to think we should treat pot smokers or any drug user like any other criminal instead of even considering regaultion like with alcocol. What about presciption pills that are abused? Those are okay because they are made in a lab but legally obtain marijuana is bad. Are you thinking lethal injunction or these criminals or would you fear the possibility they might get high right before death.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #35 of 36
This is the only time I'll ever use this emoticon, so

"I would guess that the flow chart of steps taken to get from a proper thread about stolen iDevices to conversation about the legalization of marijuana would include an image similar to this: "

If there's nothing more to be said about stolen iDevices, I'm sure PoliticalOutsider would welcome some fresh marijuana talk.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #36 of 36
I think they were tracked with the 'find my iphone app' installation

per the link: http://www.apple.com/icloud/setup/
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