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Quicken for Mac 2007 being rebuilt to work with Mac OS X 10.7 Lion

post #1 of 65
Thread Starter 
Intuit announced to customers on Thursday that it plans to release a "re-engineered" version of Quicken for Mac 2007 that will be compatible with the latest version of Apple's Mac operating system, OS X 10.7 Lion.

A note from Aaron Forth, general manager of the Intuit Personal Finance Group, was sent out to customers Thursday, acknowledging that the company has "not always delivered" on its promise to deliver the best products to Mac customers. In particular, he was addressing the fact that Quicken for Mac 2007 does not have compatibility with Mac OS X 10.7 Lion.

"I understand the frustration this may have caused you and have put a team in place to address this issue," Forth wrote. "I am happy to announce that we will have a solution that makes Quicken 2007 for Mac 'Lion-compatible' by early spring."

Details on the forthcoming release are available on Intuit's support website with a newly published list of questions and answers. There users can request to be notified when more information becomes available.

Forth told customers that the Quicken for Mac 2007 solution is "just a first step" in winning back the confidence of customers. Intuit is also expanding its development team to better support Mac users.



"I understand we have a way to go, but I wanted to start by communicating our commitment to Mac and look forward to sharing the details with you as they emerge," he said.

Intuit last overhauled Quicken for Mac with Quicken Essentials, released in early 2010. But its latest efforts aim to support legacy customers, who have been locked out from Quicken for Mac 2007 since Apple launched Lion in July.
post #2 of 65
Didn't they make a 2012? Why didn't they just make that one work instead of what sounds like a repackaging of the exact same stuff from four years ago?

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #3 of 65
Because Intuit discontinued development of Quicken for Mac.

Those programmers are working on other things (Quicken Essentials, QuickBooks, TurboTax, Mint.com, whatever). They can't really call it Quicken 2012 if it has zero new features.

The work that Intuit is doing is to incorporate the Rosetta technology to get this old Carbon PPC code to run on Lion, something that Apple had deprecated. Oh, and by the way, the code for Quicken 2007 is actually five years old, not four. It came out in 2006.

It's not like Intuit forgot about this product, they deliberately end of lifed it. At the time, they already knew that Carbon was being replaced by Cocoa and that the transition from PPC to Intel architecture would mean the PPC support would eventually end. Hence, they decided to rewrite the application from scratch, to be called Quicken Essentials. Sadly, it looks like Intuit did not put in enough resources and started with the rewrite way too late. It was released a year or two behind schedule and in a half-baked state where much key functionality was missing.
post #4 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

Because Intuit discontinued development of Quicken for Mac.

Those programmers are working on other things (Quicken Essentials, QuickBooks, TurboTax, Mint.com, whatever). They can't really call it Quicken 2012 if it has zero new features.

Just my guess that Rosetta is involved somehow. Maybe Apple licensed it to Intuit for just this one time?
post #5 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

Because Intuit discontinued development of Quicken for Mac.

I see. Shame, really.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #6 of 65
Too bad Intuit, I've moved on.
Your lack of continuing Mac support is a terrible reflection on Intuit.
As far as I'm concerned you may as well forget the Mac forever, I have better alternatives now.
post #7 of 65
They know it's almost 2012, right?
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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post #8 of 65
Quicken has a lot to go to achieve parity with the Windows version. Until then, there are other alternatives, all of which are better than 2007. It's hard to believe the (ex?) CEO is on Apple's Board when they cannot deal with Mac. Seems he should be gone - a number of years ago. They need to look to the future. Intuit certainly is not.
post #9 of 65
I still can't understand why this site still reports anything from Intuit.
post #10 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

Just my guess that Rosetta is involved somehow. Maybe Apple licensed it to Intuit for just this one time?

Yes, there were rumors of it back in June.
post #11 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

Just my guess that Rosetta is involved somehow. Maybe Apple licensed it to Intuit for just this one time?

Apple doesn't own Rosetta - they licensed it from whoever has the rights. I don't know why they couldn't (wouldn't?) add it to Lion.
post #12 of 65
: x1,000,000,000,000,000



All my life, I always wanted to be somebody. Now I see that I should have been more specific.
- Lily Tomlin
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All my life, I always wanted to be somebody. Now I see that I should have been more specific.
- Lily Tomlin
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post #13 of 65
Or Apple could just give us Rosetta for Lion and solve a lot of problems.

EDIT: Or screw Apple, why doesn't the company that owns Rosetta just release it for Lion?
post #14 of 65
Meh, I used to use Quicken, I switched to Moneydance and haven't looked back. I'm very pleased with them and more than happy to give them free advertising. Their mobile app is awesome as well.
post #15 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


A note ... acknowledging that the company has "not always delivered" on its promise to deliver the best products to Mac customers....
......
"I understand the frustration this may have caused you and have put a team in place to address this issue," ........

"I understand we have a way to go, but I ........[ View this article at AppleInsider.com ][/c]

bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla


All my life, I always wanted to be somebody. Now I see that I should have been more specific.
- Lily Tomlin
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All my life, I always wanted to be somebody. Now I see that I should have been more specific.
- Lily Tomlin
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post #16 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by NotRs View Post

Or Apple could just give us Rosetta for Lion and solve a lot of problems.

EDIT: Or screw Apple, why doesn't the company that owns Rosetta just release it for Lion?

As an AAPL shareholder, I don't want Apple squandering their precious engineering resources on maintaining Rosetta.

Let Intuit deal with it. After all, they knew about the whole transition and fumbled the ball. If another company licensed Rosetta to Apple, they might have a stab at it, but you can't keep the patience on a respirator forever.

There are a number of paths to the future, but Quicken for Mac (in the form of the 2007 code) is dead. Intuit has to really improve Quicken Essentials for Mac, improve Mint.com's investment tracking functionality, or see more Mac-based Quicken users go to the competition (like iBank).
post #17 of 65
All we need from Quicken is for it to have the exact same features as its Windows counterpart, and to work with all files interchangeably.

It's obvious, I know.
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post #18 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by elroth View Post

Apple doesn't own Rosetta - they licensed it from whoever has the rights. I don't know why they couldn't (wouldn't?) add it to Lion.

I don't think this is true. They may licence the underlying technology and they certainly didn't invent that tech, but the product itself is made by and distributed by Apple.

The reasons they wouldn't add it to Lion are obvious.
Whether they could or not or how hard it would be I don't know.
post #19 of 65
Intuit...worst company by far for Mac loyaty. Even beats Adobe.
post #20 of 65
I was a longtime Quicken for Window user -- last version was 2006. Although never in love with the Quicken user interface, it worked well for me. And I still have it on my virtual Windows XP instance on my Mac.

If there had been a decent Quicken for the Mac, I would have bought it. I looked at Quicken Essentials for Mac -- it would not have worked for me.

I am using iBank now.

iBank works well enough -- but it does not have all the features that I used in Quicken -- like using both a classification AND a category on a transaction.

And the investment portfolio stuff in iBank is also less full featured.

iBank reconciling still has bugs -- but better than before.

And, while iBank has made muchas muchas improvement in performance, there are still times when it is slow.

At this point, I would say iBank is "adequate." But even if Intuit came out with a great product, I can't see myself migrating back to Quicken after all this time.
post #21 of 65
Too late, we've already switched to iBank with no intention of going back to Quicken.
post #22 of 65
I switched to QuickBooks 2010 and I love it !
post #23 of 65
Ya' know, I am really confused...

All this confusion revolves around "Coach" Bill Campbell.

The "Coach" is a former Apple VP; former CEO of Claris; former CEO of Intuit; current Chairman of Intuit; current Board Member of Apple.

I have never understood why there ins't more cross-pollination between Apple and Intuit

I cannot understand why Intuit's products and services are not released on the Mac at the same time (or before) they are released on Windows.

There is a very special opportunity to release iPhone and iPad apps -- or. at least, tie-ins to their desktop and web apps.


I certainly hope that Intuit exploits this opportunity.




Ituit Executive Profiles

William Campbell (business executive)

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"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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post #24 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Forth told customers that the Quicken for Mac 2007 solution is "just a first step" in winning back the confidence of customers. Intuit is also expanding its development team to better support Mac users.


Intuit is going Back to the Mac?


That's truly desperate.
post #25 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Ya' know, I am really confused...

All this confusion revolves around "Coach" Bill Campbell.

The "Coach" is a former Apple VP; former CEO of Claris; former CEO of Intuit; current Chairman of Intuit; current Board Member of Apple.

I have never understood why there ins't more cross-pollination between Apple and Intuit

I cannot understand why Intuit's products and services are not released on the Mac at the same time (or before) they are released on Windows.

There is a very special opportunity to release iPhone and iPad apps -- or. at least, tie-ins to their desktop and web apps.


I certainly hope that Intuit exploits this opportunity.




Ituit Executive Profiles

William Campbell (business executive)


I agree with you. I really have a difficult time with William on Apple's BoD when the other company he has high level involvement with shows disregard for Apple.

This situation reminds me of when Apple moved to OS X and Quark XPress was the king of page layout programs. I remember how stubborn that were at not supporting OS X. Then Adobe pretty much ate their lunch with InDesign. Seems to me the same thing has happened here, way too little, too late.
post #26 of 65
Quicken Mac never had all the features of Quicken Windows.
QuickBooks Pro Mac never had the features of QuickBooks Pro for Windows -- nowhere close!
and running the Windows versions under VMware is bulky at best...

Having regretted every dollar (many many) I've given to Intuit, only to put up with unanswered questions and poor service, I've moved on -- never to return to Intuit.

iBank is not perfect but it is great to use.
post #27 of 65
Too slow! I switched to iBank 3 months ago, and like it a lot better.

Do what you will, but harm none.

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Do what you will, but harm none.

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post #28 of 65
I already switched to See Finance...very happy. There are many alternatives better than Quicken.
post #29 of 65
I looked at other alternatives, but none of the ones I checked offered online bill pay, so I stuck with the old quicken....on a machine running snow leopard. I was wanting to replace that machine, when this comes out, I can. (however with Quicken's history, I will wait for a few reviews).
post #30 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by chabig View Post

I already switched to See Finance...very happy. There are many alternatives better than Quicken.

Please show me one that has online bill pay. I couldn't find one.
post #31 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

As an AAPL shareholder, I don't want Apple squandering their precious engineering resources on maintaining Rosetta.

Let Intuit deal with it. After all, they knew about the whole transition and fumbled the ball. If another company licensed Rosetta to Apple, they might have a stab at it, but you can't keep the patience on a respirator forever.

There are a number of paths to the future, but Quicken for Mac (in the form of the 2007 code) is dead. Intuit has to really improve Quicken Essentials for Mac, improve Mint.com's investment tracking functionality, or see more Mac-based Quicken users go to the competition (like iBank).

If I were a bettin man (and I guess I am), I would say this is a stop gap. My guess is after this, they are going to bring all the features of 06 and 07 into essentials, re-name it, and do a charged upgrade. I believe that essentials was a complete re-write, in current code.
post #32 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Ya' know, I am really confused...

All this confusion revolves around "Coach" Bill Campbell.

The "Coach" is a former Apple VP; former CEO of Claris; former CEO of Intuit; current Chairman of Intuit; current Board Member of Apple.

I have never understood why there ins't more cross-pollination between Apple and Intuit

I cannot understand why Intuit's products and services are not released on the Mac at the same time (or before) they are released on Windows.

There is a very special opportunity to release iPhone and iPad apps -- or. at least, tie-ins to their desktop and web apps.


I certainly hope that Intuit exploits this opportunity.




Ituit Executive Profiles

William Campbell (business executive)


If memory serves me right Intuit was getting ready to stop development altogether on Quicken for Mac. This was right as Jobs returned. Jobs pleaded with Campbell to keep Quicken for Mac alive and he relented. Pitiful then and pitiful now.
post #33 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I don't think this is true. They may licence the underlying technology and they certainly didn't invent that tech, but the product itself is made by and distributed by Apple.

The reasons they wouldn't add it to Lion are obvious.
Whether they could or not or how hard it would be I don't know.

Ya, Apple licensed QuickTransit by Transitive Software Corporation. They marketed it as Rosetta, but it was developed by Transitive.

Transitive was then purchased by IBM in 2009.

I think Apple could've bought the rights from IBM, but since Lion is 64-bit, they would have needed engineers to re-work it. I suspect this wasn't worth it for Apple, and perhaps the original Transitive engineers weren't available for such a project.
post #34 of 65
I run Windows via VMware to run three windows apps. Two of them are quicken and quickbooks. Intuit as far as I'm concerned has zero interest in Mac software.
post #35 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkevwill View Post

If I were a bettin man (and I guess I am), I would say this is a stop gap. My guess is after this, they are going to bring all the features of 06 and 07 into essentials, re-name it, and do a charged upgrade. I believe that essentials was a complete re-write, in current code.

I doubt if the Quicken Essentials product will ever have the functionality of Quicken 2006 or 2007. After all, Intuit has had four years to bring Essentials up to Quicken for Mac levels yet they have shown little interest in sinking resources into making that happen.

The more likely scenario is that they will make Mint.com more robust and eventually drop Quicken Essentials (which is like the Fisher-Price version of personal money management applications). Note that Intuit has already killed off Quicken Online. The Windows version of the desktop software probably has a brighter/longer future.

The Quicken/Mac situation stems from a lack of commitment from Intuit's senior management, not about any sort of technical hurdle. Let's face it, the iBank guys built their program from scratch and they have far fewer resources (people, money) than a software giant like Intuit.
post #36 of 65
They better hurry up with some good Mac support (including mobility access via iPad/iPhone) 'cause I'm also considering moving my merchant account business away from them.
post #37 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post

All we need from Quicken is for it to have the exact same features as its Windows counterpart, and to work with all files interchangeably.

It's obvious, I know.

I've been a Quicken beta tester since the early 90's and many beta testers have been telling Intuit that for all that time. The only response from Intuit was that Mac users had different needs and didn't need the 'advanced features' of Quicken Windows.

But what do you expect from a company that still hasn't figured out networking as of 2011. It's really amazing that QuickBooks Mac won't network with the Windows version.

But it's not only Mac users who deal with crappy Intuit software. I spent weeks trying to get Point of Sale (appropriately abbreviated POS) working properly on Windows. Intuit was unable to figure it out, but I found something online explaining that POS was incompatible with .NET and that you had to update .NET (don't they do any more QC at Intuit?). Then, the days spent transferring a data file from one server to another. In order to make that work, you had to completely delete ALL the client software, reinstall Windows, update .net, move the data file, then reinstall POS on ALL the client computers.

It's a shame. Intuit used to make decent software, but that hasn't been true since about '95.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hmatthes View Post

Quicken Mac never had all the features of Quicken Windows.
QuickBooks Pro Mac never had the features of QuickBooks Pro for Windows -- nowhere close!
and running the Windows versions under VMware is bulky at best...

Having regretted every dollar (many many) I've given to Intuit, only to put up with unanswered questions and poor service, I've moved on -- never to return to Intuit.

iBank is not perfect but it is great to use.

I switched to SEE Finance because it was the only one that would import my Quicken data file. Unfortunately, I don't like the UI of SEE Finance.
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #38 of 65
What a complete joke of a company.
The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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post #39 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

I run Windows via VMware to run three windows apps. Two of them are quicken and quickbooks. Intuit as far as I'm concerned has zero interest in Mac software.

And that is the real shame about this situation. Apple could have fixed this with a simple change to their licensing aggreements to allow virtualizing of 10.6, 10.5 and 10.4.

- kpluck

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Do you use MagicJack?

The default settings will automatically charge your credit card each year for service renewal. You will not be notified or warned in anyway. You can turn auto renewal off.

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post #40 of 65
It is written in C or C++ isn't it? Just bite the bullet and port it proper.

I have worked on such porting projects, and the effort is *always* less than the engineers expect. Endian-ness issues are never the nightmare they are made out to be.
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