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Apple design chief Jonathan Ive awarded knighthood

post #1 of 80
Thread Starter 
Jonathan Ive, Apple's senior vice president of industrial design, has been named a Knight Commander of the British Empire in the U.K.'s 2012 New Year Honours list, an honor he has described as "absolutely thrilling."

The BBC reported on Friday that Ive can now go by "Sir Jonathan." The knighthood, which is for "services to design and enterprise," is a step up from his previous title of Commander of the British Empire, which was awarded in 2005.

Ive responded that he was "both humbled and sincerely grateful" by the commendation.

"I am keenly aware that I benefit from a wonderful tradition in the UK of designing and making," he said. "I discovered at an early age that all I've ever wanted to do is design."

Ive, who grew up in Chingford, a town northeast of London, credits his silversmith father with inspiring him as a designer.

"He's a fantastic craftsman," Ive said, as noted in Jobs' biography. "His Christmas gift to me would be one day of his time in his college workshop, during the Christmas break when no one else was there, helping me make whatever I dreamed up."



Ive went on to study Industrial Design at Newcastle Polytechnic, now called Northumbria University. It was there that he first realized the potential of designing on the Mac.

"I discovered the Mac and felt I had a connection with the people who were making this product," he said. "I suddenly understood what a company was, or was supposed to be."

After graduating, Ive worked as a designer in the U.K., eventually founding a design agency. Apple hired the firm to do design work and was so impressed by Ive's work that it offered him a full-time position.

During his 19 years at Apple, Ive grew to become a "spiritual partner" of co-founder Steve Jobs, according to Jobs' biography. Jobs confided that he had left Ive with "more operational power" than anyone else at the company.

"There's no one who can tell him what to do," Jobs told biographer Walter Isaacson. "That's the way I set it up.'"

While Jobs and Ive were close friends, Ive did admit to Isaacson that he felt Jobs had stolen the credit for some of his ideas.

"[Jobs] will go through a process of looking at my ideas and say, 'That's no good. That's not very good. I like that one,'" Ive told Isaacson in an interview. "And later I will be sitting in the audience and he will be talking about it as if it was his idea. I pay maniacal attention to where an idea comes from, and I even keep notebooks filled with my ideas. So it hurts when he takes credit for one of my designs."

Ive has received numerous industry awards for his work as a designer, including the title of smartest designer in tech by Forbes Magazine, Designer of the Year by the Design Museum London and Royal Designer for Industry by The Royal Society of Arts. Earlier this year, Ive and his designs were featured in an exhibit at a German art museum.

Interestingly enough, Jobs himself was considered for an honorary knighthood by the Queen of the United Kingdom, but the proposal was blocked by a former Prime Minister because Jobs declined to speak at a Labour Party conference.
post #2 of 80
He looks thrilled by the news.
post #3 of 80
Well deserved award. Truly talented.
post #4 of 80
It's too bad that knights don't have a suit of armour any more, else he could have designed his own.
post #5 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacVicta View Post

He looks thrilled by the news.

In that Chuck Norris kinda way.
post #6 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

It's too bad that knights don't have a suit of armour any more, else he could have designed his own.

Out of a single piece of anodized aluminum.

Originally Posted by Marvin

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post #7 of 80
We should have known this was coming, with the release of Sir-I.

Actually, it's Apple that takes the credit for Ive's ideas. Jobs was just a spokesman.
post #8 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Out of a single piece of anodized aluminum.

Now that *would* take a design genius.
post #9 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Out of a single piece of anodized aluminum.

I was about to request no one make such obvious jokes. Missed it by that much.

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post #10 of 80
Well deserved. WHAT a man
post #11 of 80
First of all, I'm very glad for Ive - well-deserved recognition!

I just feel like rambling about a couple things: and that's all this is - rambling.

1. I still haven't had a chance to read the Jobs biography. But Ive's comments about Jobs taking credit for some of his ideas bothers me. I just don't know what to think of Jobs - a man the press simultaneously calls genius and mercurial. I'm concerned that Apple's success may have resulted from his hard-driving, unreasonable approach... and now that Mr. Jobs is gone?! What now? I want Apple to continue to make great products and experience phenomenal success! I hope things will not deteriorate in his absence.

2. The English, to me, are an enigma. They have some wonderful car designs - the Jaguars and the Range Rovers are beautiful and the MG Midget my dad drove in his youth was splendid - but their build quality and reliability are terrible! And it's not for lack of smarts: the English built the Colossus computer during the World War II which decoded Nazi ciphers. I just don't understand why their designs are so good but their quality can be so bad! But I'm so glad that in the case of Apple Ive's wonderful designs are backed by outstanding quality!

All in all this is wonderful news about Ive and congratulations to him!!! :-)
post #12 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I was about to request no one make such obvious jokes. Missed it by that much.

Oh, don't worry. It would have one button on it so that you could take it off.

And if you're fighting in daytime, it would reflect sunlight into your enemies' eyes!

Oh, and it would only work with proprietary undersuits.

90s Apple jokes; I have a million of 'em!

Originally Posted by Marvin

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Originally Posted by Marvin

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post #13 of 80
It would have been an honorary Knighthood, you need to be British for a real one!!
post #14 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

We should have known this was coming, with the release of Sir-I.

Actually, it's Apple that takes the credit for Ive's ideas. Jobs was just a spokesman.

Last I checked Apple has a whole design team. Ive would tell you as much.
post #15 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacVicta View Post

He looks thrilled by the news.

Between Tim Cook's upside down smile and Ive's omnipresent dour look, Apple's executive meetings must be quite lively.
post #16 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by big View Post

2. The English, to me, are an enigma. They have some wonderful car designs - the Jaguars and the Range Rovers are beautiful and the MG Midget my dad drove in his youth was splendid - but their build quality and reliability are terrible! And it's not for lack of smarts: the English built the Colossus computer during the World War II which decoded Nazi ciphers. I just don't understand why their designs are so good but their quality can be so bad! But I'm so glad that in the case of Apple Ive's wonderful designs are backed by outstanding quality!

Would manufacturers in a nation of nerds necessarily develop a tradition of quality? I mean, you could assume the public could fix anything that breaks...
post #17 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Oh, don't worry. It would have one button on it so that you could take it off.

And if you're fighting in daytime, it would reflect sunlight into your enemies' eyes!

Oh, and it would only work with proprietary undersuits.

90s Apple jokes; I have a million of 'em!

It doesn't bear thinking about where he'd put the touch-sensitive, graphic user interface...
Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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post #18 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by big View Post

I still haven't had a chance to read the Jobs biography. But Ive's comments about Jobs taking credit for some of his ideas bothers me. I just don't know what to think of Jobs - a man the press simultaneously calls genius and mercurial. I'm concerned that Apple's success may have resulted from his hard-driving, unreasonable approach... and now that Mr. Jobs is gone?! What now? I want Apple to continue to make great products and experience phenomenal success! I hope things will not deteriorate in his absence.

Read the biography. Ive's comments quoted here are not out of context, but they'd bother you less (probably not at all, to be honest) after you read the biography. You'll also have a better sense of Apple's future.

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post #19 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

We should have known this was coming, with the release of Sir-I.

Actually, it's Apple that takes the credit for Ive's ideas. Jobs was just a spokesman.

Very clever.
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post #20 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Missed it by that much.

Okay, Maxwell Smart...

"Out of a single piece of anodized aluminum"... I was thinking a 'UniBody' design!

Did you know there was video of the ceremony?!!!...

Is Siri the 'damsel in distress'?

Congrats, Sir Jon!
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post #21 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Last I checked Apple has a whole design team. Ive would tell you as much.

But it was Ive himself talking about "his" ideas.
post #22 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

We should have known this was coming, with the release of Sir-I.

Actually, it's Apple that takes the credit for Ive's ideas. Jobs was just a spokesman.

You insult Johnathan with your ignorance.
post #23 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

You insult Johnathan with your ignorance.

He made a joke. Nothing to be offended by.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #24 of 80
"Interestingly enough, Jobs himself was also considered for knighthood by the Queen of the United Kingdom, but the proposal was blocked by a former Prime Minister because Jobs declined to speak at a Labour Party conference."

Ah yes... British people unfortunately remember (though he's eminently forgetable) the "One-eyed son of the Manse" - also known as Gordon "Moron" Brown, the unelected Socialist Prime Minister - who ruined their economy and whose temper tantrums included throwing his Nokia at anyone within range.
post #25 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by big View Post

I still haven't had a chance to read the Jobs biography. But Ive's comments about Jobs taking credit for some of his ideas bothers me. I just don't know what to think of Jobs - a man the press simultaneously calls genius and mercurial. I'm concerned that Apple's success may have resulted from his hard-driving, unreasonable approach... and now that Mr. Jobs is gone?! What now? I want Apple to continue to make great products and experience phenomenal success! I hope things will not deteriorate in his absence.

Read it, it will show you that things won't deteriorate as the product Steve is most proud of is the company itself, not the iPhone or whatever. Yes, he was a man with only two faces, some inks are quite upsetting when you read the book. But it is a fascinating story, a must read.
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post #26 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by big View Post

First of all, I'm very glad for Ive - well-deserved recognition!

I just feel like rambling about a couple things: and that's all this is - rambling.

1. I still haven't had a chance to read the Jobs biography. But Ive's comments about Jobs taking credit for some of his ideas bothers me. I just don't know what to think of Jobs - a man the press simultaneously calls genius and mercurial. I'm concerned that Apple's success may have resulted from his hard-driving, unreasonable approach... and now that Mr. Jobs is gone?! What now? I want Apple to continue to make great products and experience phenomenal success! I hope things will not deteriorate in his absence.

2. The English, to me, are an enigma. They have some wonderful car designs - the Jaguars and the Range Rovers are beautiful and the MG Midget my dad drove in his youth was splendid - but their build quality and reliability are terrible! And it's not for lack of smarts: the English built the Colossus computer during the World War II which decoded Nazi ciphers. I just don't understand why their designs are so good but their quality can be so bad! But I'm so glad that in the case of Apple Ive's wonderful designs are backed by outstanding quality!

All in all this is wonderful news about Ive and congratulations to him!!! :-)

I also recommend reading the biography. It's a good read, and it'll prevent you from making any comments based on material that has been taking out of context which, unfortunately, happens an awful lot.

Don't worry about the English thing. That comes down to taste. If you ever get the chance to travel, you'll realise how much taste varies from country to country. Trust me on this. I'm from Australia and we look at both English AND American cars and go, 'WTF!'. And I'm sure you'd do the same if you saw our stuff...
Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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post #27 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by big View Post


2. The English, to me, are an enigma. They have some wonderful car designs - the Jaguars and the Range Rovers are beautiful and the MG Midget my dad drove in his youth was splendid - but their build quality and reliability are terrible! And it's not for lack of smarts: the English built the Colossus computer during the World War II which decoded Nazi ciphers. I just don't understand why their designs are so good but their quality can be so bad! But I'm so glad that in the case of Apple Ive's wonderful designs are backed by outstanding quality!

This is too big and complex a question to fully answer here, but I've long been fascinated by how something as vast and amorphous as a national culture, national character even, manifests itself. In Britain (speaking as a Brit) at the heart of everything is the class system. It sits below the surface these days, but it's still there defining so much about how we think and what we do. 'Old money' is the thing, based on ownership of land and lineage, while manufacturing is relegated to lower 'blue collar' status. Compare the status of an engineer in the UK to one in Germany for example. The former pretty much seen as someone with dirty hands, while the latter is a highly regarded professional.

How this shows itself, if you will forgive the management-speak, is that we are (broadly generalising) a nation of 'creatives' and not 'finishers'. In the 20th century there was a whole host of brilliant inventions in the UK that once invented, just sat around doing nothing until someone else came along and made them into something. Ive and Apple has been a perfect marriage because it is the union of the 'conception' and the 'inception'. Ive's creative genius fully plugged into an organisation that can turn ideas into things.
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Believe nothing, no matter where you heard it, not even if I have said it, if it does not agree with your own reason and your own common sense.
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post #28 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by bor15 View Post

It would have been an honorary Knighthood, you need to be British for a real one!!

He is British, born in London UK,
post #29 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evilution View Post

He is British, born in London UK,

I'm on about Steve! Read the article fully then my title on my post!!
post #30 of 80
So, this is one of the guys who do all they can to take away user serviceability from Apple products, so they can hope to charge premium prices for everything.

Any designer can make a product look reasonably good and work OK - it's just a question of making mass production possible in a profitable way. Doesn't take a genius to come up with something like a unibody design, but to get those unibodies manufactured affordably is another matter. Well, the Far East does that.

Battery replacement the user can do (accepting full responsibility for doing it); the solution is just about a few screws - nothing more. But when Apple insists on doing it, there is more profit.

Same principle with the App Store: Soon, they will want full control over what you run on your Apple gear; who, how, what and when.

Currently, I'm on an older MacBook I can still order a battery for and get it delivered and install it without going anywhere myself. In the future, on new gear, I'd have to know shady people in order to get the parts at all, then void warranties installing the parts myself.

Making Lion self-installable is fairly complicated, but still possible. But for how long?

Jonathan & Co, make yourself true knights and do some of these things:

1) Let users replace batteries.

2) Design a "bypass the battery when the machine is plugged in" selectable solution.

3) Make a laptop with a touch screen that runs OS X and not the iOS - some slack for what the user can do.

4) Make laptops with dual drives; spinning or solid-state - doesn't matter, but 2.
post #31 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

.....we look at both English AND American cars and go, 'WTF!'. And I'm sure you'd do the same if you saw our stuff...


Yea, look at all those wonderful Aussi designed and built Formula 1 cars .....Brrrrrrrrrm Car!\
post #32 of 80
That his father gave him a day with him in the shop to design is the real gem in this story. Not enough parents share time with their children let alone encouraging their interests.

It's obvious Sir Jon loves to build beautiful things. And my life is so much nicer because of it.
post #33 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Secular Investor View Post

Yea, look at all those wonderful Aussi designed and built Formula 1 cars .....Brrrrrrrrrm Car!\

Exactly! It all comes down to taste!
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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post #34 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by big View Post

First of all, I'm very glad for Ive - well-deserved recognition!

I just feel like rambling about a couple things: and that's all this is - rambling.

1. I still haven't had a chance to read the Jobs biography. But Ive's comments about Jobs taking credit for some of his ideas bothers me. I just don't know what to think of Jobs - a man the press simultaneously calls genius and mercurial. I'm concerned that Apple's success may have resulted from his hard-driving, unreasonable approach... and now that Mr. Jobs is gone?! What now? I want Apple to continue to make great products and experience phenomenal success! I hope things will not deteriorate in his absence.

2. The English, to me, are an enigma. They have some wonderful car designs - the Jaguars and the Range Rovers are beautiful and the MG Midget my dad drove in his youth was splendid - but their build quality and reliability are terrible! And it's not for lack of smarts: the English built the Colossus computer during the World War II which decoded Nazi ciphers. I just don't understand why their designs are so good but their quality can be so bad! But I'm so glad that in the case of Apple Ive's wonderful designs are backed by outstanding quality!

All in all this is wonderful news about Ive and congratulations to him!!! :-)

Not entirely accurate - Rolls Royce make jet engines (built in Derby, UK, near where I live) which are extremely reliable by the nature of their job... they compete with GE for much of the commercial jet-engine marketshare, showing there's still something us anglo-saxons can make still!
post #35 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by big View Post

First of all, I'm very glad for Ive - well-deserved recognition!

I just feel like rambling about a couple things: and that's all this is - rambling.

1. I still haven't had a chance to read the Jobs biography. But Ive's comments about Jobs taking credit for some of his ideas bothers me. I just don't know what to think of Jobs - a man the press simultaneously calls genius and mercurial. I'm concerned that Apple's success may have resulted from his hard-driving, unreasonable approach... and now that Mr. Jobs is gone?! What now? I want Apple to continue to make great products and experience phenomenal success! I hope things will not deteriorate in his absence.

2. The English, to me, are an enigma. They have some wonderful car designs - the Jaguars and the Range Rovers are beautiful and the MG Midget my dad drove in his youth was splendid - but their build quality and reliability are terrible! And it's not for lack of smarts: the English built the Colossus computer during the World War II which decoded Nazi ciphers. I just don't understand why their designs are so good but their quality can be so bad! But I'm so glad that in the case of Apple Ive's wonderful designs are backed by outstanding quality!

All in all this is wonderful news about Ive and congratulations to him!!! :-)

I've lived over on this side of the pond for nearly 7 years, so whilst I can't claim I understand what makes them tick, perhaps I have more of a handle than the average Yank who's been to London for a few days in his life. No one answer is all-encompassing. I can say, they have way too many bureaucrats; they have a social care network that allows failure with few consequences; the working stiff can do the best quality in the world, but he may be beholden to clueless superiors (this phenomenon is hardly Brit-specific) who can't differentiate between excellent and good enough.

While there is a lot of good design here, I've seen product and system design flaws that would leave many scratching their heads. If you've ever gotten dirty under the bonnet of some of the iconic ragtops of the 1950s and 1960s, you'll know what I'm talking about; one of the oldest running jokes among vintage car owners is, Why do the English drink warm beer? Lucas electricala nod to the company that made the instruments and wiring for MGs, Triumphs and others. I would say that Jonny Ive is a one off who was raised in a perfect environment for his needs and at apple he flourished
post #36 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcsegenmd View Post

I've lived over on this side of the pond for nearly 7 years, so whilst I can't claim I understand what makes them tick, perhaps I have more of a handle than the average Yank who's been to London for a few days in his life. No one answer is all-encompassing. I can say, they have way too many bureaucrats; they have a social care network that allows failure with few consequences; the working stiff can do the best quality in the world, but he may be beholden to clueless superiors (this phenomenon is hardly Brit-specific) who can't differentiate between excellent and good enough.

While there is a lot of good design here, I've seen product and system design flaws that would leave many scratching their heads. If you've ever gotten dirty under the bonnet of some of the iconic ragtops of the 1950s and 1960s, you'll know what I'm talking about; one of the oldest running jokes among vintage car owners is, Why do the English drink warm beer? Lucas electricala nod to the company that made the instruments and wiring for MGs, Triumphs and others. I would say that Jonny Ive is a one off who was raised in a perfect environment for his needs and at apple he flourished

As a former owner of a 74 MG Midget this brought a smile to my face. But with respect to Ive, he is a designer, not an engineer. That was one of the "collaboration" issues that kept popping up in the book.
post #37 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacVicta View Post

He looks thrilled by the news.

exactly, he needs to put on a smile for the Queen and drop that scowl
post #38 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by big View Post

2. The English, to me, are an enigma. They have some wonderful car designs - the Jaguars and the Range Rovers are beautiful and the MG Midget my dad drove in his youth was splendid - but their build quality and reliability are terrible! And it's not for lack of smarts: the English built the Colossus computer during the World War II which decoded Nazi ciphers. I just don't understand why their designs are so good but their quality can be so bad! But I'm so glad that in the case of Apple Ive's wonderful designs are backed by outstanding quality!

For disclosure as to where my opinions are coming from, I'm a Brit, living in the UK.

Basically, the British are an inventive people, but have not always been very good at understanding the difference between being an inventor and being an engineer. It was assumed that whoever invented or designed a product would be able to make the whole thing into a product, and we missed the boat when other countries (notably Germany with cars) figured out that once someone had designed the look of a car, someone else was needed to make it reliable, so in that sense, we didn't engineer cars to be reliable in the way the Germans did.

Effectively we allowed one key player in a design to hold sway over everything, so the thing never worked as a whole. So it wasn't just we made good looking cars that were unreliable, Lotus for example would be fixated on making their cars fast, and would forget reliable (it's telling that Lotus is jokingly said to stand for, Lots Of Trouble, Usually Serious).

The British car industry was then let down by serious union strife in the 1970s (by the way, please don't turn this into a union vs. non-union debate - both the unions and the car manufacturers did much to antagonize each other during the 70's) and as such build quality went through the floor.

However, things have improved dramatically. Nissan in Japan actually badge some of their cars with a Union Jack, to indicate that it was made in the UK Nissan plant, and the Japanese will pay a premium for those ones, as they regard the build quality as superior to ones made in Japan. Honda, BMW (with the Mini), Jaguar, Range Rover etc. are all now foreign owned, and have infused a culture quality that the UK didn't have, and they are all making excellent quality products now, aligned with what has always been a strong design aesthetic. Britain has actually done a pretty good job of accepting foreign ownership of British brands, and has worked that to everyones advantage.

As someone else mentioned, Rolls-Royce aero engines compete with the best in terms of efficiency, reliability and quality, and BAe systems are a world leader in weapons systems.

So, in summary, you are absolutely right to call out poor British quality, but in my opinion, it is increasingly a thing of the past.
post #39 of 80
would have such an archaic and ridiculous title.
post #40 of 80
Good for him, well done Sir Jony

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