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Apple granted original list-editing iPhone patent, 13 others

post #1 of 37
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The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has granted Apple an original iPhone patent for editing lists using touch gestures that allow for a seamless smartphone experience, as well as inventions regarding use of the handset as a portable hard drive and a filing for the company's now defunct Bluetooth headset.

A list of thirteen original Apple patents was officially published on Wednesday by the USPTO, with a key list editing filing not only arming the company's legal team with yet another weapon for future litigation, but also giving a glimpse into the how Apple sought to change the future of smartphones by creating a truly integrated user interface, according to Apple patent blog Patently Apple.

The original touchscreen patent, first filed for in June 2007, covers a method for displaying and managing lists on a portable multifunction device, and details a simple computer user interface controlled by finger gestures rather than a sequence of button presses and stylus touches.

What the abstract describes is the basic list management system found on current iOS devices.

Included in the patent background is a look at the state of portable devices at the time, which Apple claimed "resorted to adding more pushbuttons, increasing the density of push buttons, overloading the functions of pushbuttons, or using complex menu systems to allow a user to access, store and manipulate data." A far cry from what the company eventually released in the original one-button iPhone.

Apple's granted patent regarding list editing | Source: Patently Apple

The claim goes on to explain that devices which rely on physical pushbuttons are inherently limited in their configurability, and that a conventional user may find it frustrating to operate such an inflexible interface. As the argument slowly builds its case for touch-screens over physical buttons, Apple is quick to point out that the stylus is also obsolete.

Because such devices are designed to read the precise pinpoint contact of the stylus (when a user makes a selection on the touch screen with the stylus), making selections on the touch screen of the device without a stylus, for example, with a user's finger, can prove to be somewhat difficult.
The filing wraps up by concluding that a more transparent UI be implemented, one that features finger input to select and manipulate on-screen items that are easy to use, configure and adapt.

As we see in current iOS devices, Apple's answer to the "transparent UI" was to leverage another recently-granted patent for capacitive touch panels and a battery of multi-touch gestures to create a user experience that is far more customizable than physical pushbutton operation.

Along with the above list-editing patent, Apple was granted a filing regarding pairing and storage access between a handheld device and a computer which describes how the iPhone is able to be used as a portable hard drive.

Rounding out the patent list is a filing for Apple's Bluetooth headset, which was pulled from shelves following a lukewarm reception after it was introduced shortly after the first iPhone in 2007.
post #2 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has granted Apple an original iPhone patent for editing lists using touch gestures that allow for a seamless smartphone experience ...

Clear as mud.

Why bother publishing articles like this at all? Anyone have a link to a site that actually explains this?
post #3 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Clear as mud.

Why bother publishing articles like this at all? Anyone have a link to a site that actually explains this?

Try reading the story.
post #4 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Clear as mud.

Why bother publishing articles like this at all? Anyone have a link to a site that actually explains this?

The article on AI linked to the original article. You can read the original article at Patently Apple which might go into more detail (I briefly glanced):
http://www.patentlyapple.com/patentl...-and-more.html
post #5 of 37
Good for Apple! More ammo for the patent wars.
post #6 of 37
From what I can see these patents look unique.

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post #7 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

From what I can see these patents look unique.

Unique, until copied by Android OEM's.

As the wheels of government departments slowly turn, the copyists have more and more to answer for.
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post #8 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

From what I can see these patents look unique.

Poor Apple, I love to see them scrounge around for anything that they can use against Android. Its all they can do really as Android is wiping the floor with them. And then its also fun to sit back and watch there law suits be shot down on the account that the patents are outdated or baseless. LOL go suck an egg Apple.

Android rules.
post #9 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by some internet dude View Post

Poor Apple, I love to see them scrounge around for anything that they can use against Android. Its all they can do really as Android is wiping the floor with them. And then its also fun to sit back and watch there law suits be shot down on the account that the patents are outdated or baseless. LOL go suck an egg Apple.

Android rules.

Android rules what? Definitely the leader of dysfunctional, fragmented mediocrity resulting from cobbling together and hastily trying to steal everybody else's IP, whether from Microsoft, Oracle or Apple.

Apple are building a whole armoury of patents around touch screen and gestures which slowly but steadily will degrade even further the lousy Android user experience
post #10 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by some internet dude View Post

Poor Apple, I love to see them scrounge around for anything that they can use against Android. Its all they can do really as Android is wiping the floor with them. And then its also fun to sit back and watch there law suits be shot down on the account that the patents are outdated or baseless. LOL go suck an egg Apple.

Android rules.



Yes, that IS what an Android fanboy might say to troll (under the old, oft-misused definition, meaning 'making crap up while simultaneously ignoring truth to serve a personal vision that runs contrariwise to the actual facts AND the general position of the place being trolled') the forums. That's an impressive emulation.

(There, I saved your bacon. Now run!)

Oh. Your entire posting history is nothing but this short-sighted nonsense.



I see.
post #11 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post



Yes, that IS what an Android fanboy might say to troll (under the old, oft-misused definition, meaning 'making crap up while simultaneously ignoring truth to serve a personal vision that runs contrariwise to the actual facts AND the general position of the place being trolled') the forums. That's an impressive emulation.

(There, I saved your bacon. Now run!)

Oh. Your entire posting history is nothing but this short-sighted nonsense.



I see.

So.... there's a way to deal with posters that bring nothing but trollish nonsense......
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post #12 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

From what I can see these patents look unique.

What's so unique about the list editing patent? I must be missing it. Replace the word finger with pointing device and you've got the same method used to edit lists that already exists in various programs. Hardly unique.
post #13 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

What's so unique about the list editing patent? I must be missing it. Replace the word finger with pointing device and you've got the same method used to edit lists that already exists in various programs. Hardly unique.

Can you show me examples of where that exact same action was done with a stylus?

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post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Can you show me examples of where that exact same action was done with a stylus?

This particular touchscreen patent doesn't look to be anymore than what IBM Simon, the "original touchscreen phone", did back in '93.

For those unfamiliar with it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Simon
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post #15 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

This particular touchscreen patent doesn't look to be anymore than what IBM Simon, the "original touchscreen phone", did back in '93.

For those unfamiliar with it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Simon

My question wasn't difficult to understand. Where is the evidence showing the specific methods of editing lists in these patents being used in prior devices?

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post #16 of 37
Can someone explain the harddrive patent.
post #17 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Along with the above list-editing patent, Apple was granted a filing regarding pairing and storage access between a handheld device and a computer which describes how the iPhone is able to be used as a portable hard drive.

A shame this never came to be. I still carry a USB stick with me for large files which copies way faster than going through iDisk or similar methods.
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post #18 of 37
Yeah, where are our portable hard drive iPhones. Not that you can't but it is too custom (by which I mean they rely on the random off chance someone has the exact same app/desktop software at the other end)
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post #19 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

My question wasn't difficult to understand. Where is the evidence showing the specific methods of editing lists in these patents being used in prior devices?

If it's not difficult to understand, what do you see as the difference in the way the Simon editted/accessed items in a list and Apple's patent?
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post #20 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

If it's not difficult to understand, what do you see as the difference in the way the Simon editted/accessed items in a list and Apple's patent?

Maybe you should post some evidence that there are similarities. I imagine very few people, including yourself, have ever seen a Simon in action. There's certainly nothing in the info at the link you posted that would support your assertion.
post #21 of 37
I am of two minds about this - or three. Yes, the list editing in iOS is sublime, and was from day 1. Clearly some very clever people invented this. Probably Steve Jobs himself, RIP.
Second, it's very clever, but a patent? That prevents anyone else from doing the same thing? That seems overkill.
Third, Samsung is really going all out with its efforts to copy Apple products 1:1, to wit the latest Galaxy something Plus which looks 1:1 like an iPhone 3GS... I mean WTF Samsung, there should be a law against this. Oh wait, there is...

I love this sentence: "The claim goes on to explain that devices which rely on physical pushbuttons are inherently limited in their configurability"

It took Google 4 years to figure this out. They have claimed their hardware buttons as an advantage vs iOS. Until 2011, that is, when they removed them all. RIM still doesn't get it even today...
post #22 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by orthorim View Post

I am of two minds about this - or three. Yes, the list editing in iOS is sublime, and was from day 1. Clearly some very clever people invented this. Probably Steve Jobs himself, RIP.
Second, it's very clever, but a patent? That prevents anyone else from doing the same thing? That seems overkill.
Third, Samsung is really going all out with its efforts to copy Apple products 1:1, to wit the latest Galaxy something Plus which looks 1:1 like an iPhone 3GS... I mean WTF Samsung, there should be a law against this. Oh wait, there is...

I love this sentence: "The claim goes on to explain that devices which rely on physical pushbuttons are inherently limited in their configurability"

It took Google 4 years to figure this out. They have claimed their hardware buttons as an advantage vs iOS. Until 2011, that is, when they removed them all. RIM still doesn't get it even today...

. . . which is one of the points I was making when I mentioned the almost 20 year old IBM Simon touchscreen phone. It didn't have any buttons either, using finger presses or an optional stylus to select and/or modify menu items and lists.
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post #23 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

. . . which is one of the points I was making when I mentioned the almost 20 year old IBM Simon touchscreen phone. It didn't have any buttons either, using finger presses or an optional stylus to select and/or modify menu items and lists.

Still continuing with the baseless bullshit, Gatorguy? You haven't presented any evidence that working with lists on the Simon was anything at all like working with lists in iOS. Frankly, I don't think you know anything about the Simon, and have never even touched one. Once again, you seem to be just making shit up, and hoping that you won't get called out for it.

Consider yourself called out for lying... again.
post #24 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Still continuing with the baseless bullshit, Gatorguy? You haven't presented any evidence that working with lists on the Simon was anything at all like working with lists in iOS. Frankly, I don't think you know anything about the Simon, and have never even touched one. Once again, you seem to be just making shit up, and hoping that you won't get called out for it.

Consider yourself called out for lying... again.

Lying? Come on now...you have no evidence for lying...what you should be doing is repeatedly asking for evidence of his claims otherwise completely dismiss him as mistaken, misguided, or quite possibly lying...but to jump to that isn't a logical conclusion.

Edit: having looked at the Simon briefly on Youtube I am under the impression he is mistaken in what the patent covers as I cannot see that phone having any sort of "drag" ability...but I don't think he's lying as you extremely put it...Lying implies intent.
post #25 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

If it's not difficult to understand, what do you see as the difference in the way the Simon editted/accessed items in a list and Apple's patent?

I you posted a link with a couple of poor screenshots. Nothing showed a patent describing how the Simon interface worked, you posted no video of the Simon interface in comparison to iOS/CocoaTouch UI, nor did you make any attempt to describe how Simon's UI is a rip of the way CocoaTouch works in regards to Apple's patents. All you did is find something with a touch interface that predates the iPhone.

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post #26 of 37
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Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

Lying? Come on now...you have no evidence for lying...what you should be doing is repeatedly asking for evidence of his claims otherwise completely dismiss him as mistaken, misguided, or quite possibly lying...but to jump to that isn't a logical conclusion.

Edit: having looked at the Simon briefly on Youtube I am under the impression he is mistaken in what the patent covers as I cannot see that phone having any sort of "drag" ability...but I don't think he's lying as you extremely put it...Lying implies intent.

The intent is obviously there. He knows he can't support those claims, he knows he doesn't have a clue what capabilities Simon had. That's why he's ignoring the requests for substantiation. That's his MO, his history here is replete with lies and half truths, and that's what he gets paid for. So, yes, he's intentionally bullshitting with the hope to deceive... lying

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I you posted a link with a couple of poor screenshots. Nothing showed a patent describing how the Simon interface worked, you posted no video of the Simon interface in comparison to iOS/CocoaTouch UI, nor did you make any attempt to describe how Simon's UI is a rip of the way CocoaTouch works in regards to Apple's patents. All you did is find something with a touch interface that predates the iPhone.

... Something which no one is likely able to get their hands on to verify his claims. And, really, does anyone here believe that Gatorguy has ever had his hands on a Simon? No.
post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

The intent is obviously there. He knows he can't support those claims, he knows he doesn't have a clue what capabilities Simon had. That's why he's ignoring the requests for substantiation. That's his MO, his history here is replete with lies and half truths, and that's what he gets paid for. So, yes, he's intentionally bullshitting with the hope to deceive... lying

... Something which no one is likely able to get their hands on to verify his claims. And, really, does anyone here believe that Gatorguy has ever had his hands on a Simon? No.

I can deftly refute his claims and prove the IBM Simon could not edit lists the way Apple's patent demonstrates.

EXHIBIT A: Video of IBM Simon Note that it uses a resistive touchscreen, not a capacitive touchscreen.

EXHIBIT B: Image from the patent filing with a comparison of how editing lists work in iOS.

Conclusion: There is no way for the IBM Simon to allow for the repositioning of a virtual item by dragging it across the screen and placing it in a new virtual location.

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post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I you posted a link with a couple of poor screenshots. Nothing showed a patent describing how the Simon interface worked, you posted no video of the Simon interface in comparison to iOS/CocoaTouch UI, nor did you make any attempt to describe how Simon's UI is a rip of the way CocoaTouch works in regards to Apple's patents. All you did is find something with a touch interface that predates the iPhone.

That's why I posed the question for you Solipsism. I was trying to identify the claim vs Simon. I was hoping you understood better what the Apple touch patent did that the Simon did not. Neither relies on any physical buttons, and both use touch to move thru the menu items and make selections. But no multi-touch on the Simon.

Figured you did a video search. There's several videos on the Simon on Youtube, but none are that great, I agree. Do a search for IBM Simon video for several different choices.

(Love this one. Campy and "better than Android" )
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUG7nwMmoUc
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post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Conclusion: There is no way for the IBM Simon to allow for the repositioning of a virtual item by dragging it across the screen and placing it in a new virtual location.

Perfect! That's really all I wanted to know. I was never claiming they were the same, only that I wasn't clear on what the difference was, if any.

Much appreciated.

EDIT: Thanks for the Anonymouse quotes too. I wasn't sure if he had changed his stripes and decided personal attacks and ad-homs weren't the way to win an argument and demonstrate intelligence. I see he hasn't, so leaving him on my iggy list is still the best thing to do.
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post #30 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

This particular touchscreen patent doesn't look to be anymore than what IBM Simon, the "original touchscreen phone", did back in '93.

For those unfamiliar with it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Simon

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

If it's not difficult to understand, what do you see as the difference in the way the Simon editted/accessed items in a list and Apple's patent?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

. . . which is one of the points I was making when I mentioned the almost 20 year old IBM Simon touchscreen phone. It didn't have any buttons either, using finger presses or an optional stylus to select and/or modify menu items and lists.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Perfect! That's really all I wanted to know. I was never claiming they were the same, only that I wasn't clear on what the difference was, if any.

Much appreciated.

I'm sorry, but every one of those top 3 quotes puts out the impression that you have experience w/the Simon and that you are implying it functions in the same way. Saying "Hey that isn't what I was saying at all, I wanted clarification" is very disingenuous of you.
post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSquirrel View Post

I'm sorry, but every one of those top 3 quotes puts out the impression that you have experience w/the Simon and that you are implying it functions in the same way. Saying "Hey that isn't what I was saying at all, I wanted clarification" is very disingenuous of you.

I absolutely WAS saying that it appeared to work the same way from what I could see. I have no idea where you got the idea I had used one.

Solipsism took the time to research it further (obviously understanding it better than I did) and explained why it was not. I never claimed it DID factually work the same way, regardless of your wish that I had.

Why would you seem to have a problem with that?
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post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I absolutely WAS saying that it appeared to work the same way from what I could see. I have no idea where you got the idea I had used one.

Solipsism took the time to research it further (obviously understanding it better than I did) and explained why it was not. I never claimed it DID factually work the same way, regardless of your wish that I had.

Why would you seem to have a problem with that?

Because your revisionist explanation is total bullshit. SSquirrel nailed it, and you.

You were up to your usual disingenuous tricks, got caught, and are now trying to spin what you did as something else entirely. It's disgusting that Google and its Android partners feel they have to hire lying shills like you to go around to tech blogs and spread misinformation. But, your character speaks to their characters, and everyone should take note.
post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Because your revisionist explanation is total bullshit. SSquirrel nailed it, and you.

You were up to your usual disingenuous tricks, got caught, and are now trying to spin what you did as something else entirely. It's disgusting that Google and its Android partners feel they have to hire lying shills like you to go around to tech blogs and spread misinformation. But, your character speaks to their characters, and everyone should take note.

I'd say things about you...but then I'd be banned again.

You sure as hell do love your conspiracy theories, however.
post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

I'd say things about you...but then I'd be banned again.

You sure as hell do love your conspiracy theories, however.

I'd rather you hadn't quoted him, and there's no reason to defend me. His opinion is of no importance to me whatsoever and he simply repeats himself for the most part. He's completely irrelevant to my place in life.
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post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Can you show me examples of where that exact same action was done with a stylus?

Do you miss my point about it being very generic? Finger, stylus, mouse cursor, or a Swedish meatball. The only difference is the particular pointing device. I don't understand why such a thing is patentable. It's the same actions already carried out to edit lists in numerous programs:

a.) Select button to activate list editing mode
b.) Select item to move
c.) Move selected item to new location in list
d.) Select button to save list changes

That's what the list edit patent comes down to. Where is the originality in that?

The mouse cursor is just a virtual representation of a finger (as is glaringly obvious by the fact that the mouse cursor turns into a hand in a browser to select a link).
post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'd rather you hadn't quoted him, and there's no reason to defend me. His opinion is of no importance to me whatsoever and he simply repeats himself for the most part. He's completely irrelevant to my place in life.

There are two types of people I disagree with here...one type I respect (and thankfully are the majority as beyond the bullshit this is a rather mature board with rather mature people)

anonymouse is not a respectable poster. He's a step above Apple ][ which, being just a step, is a pretty shitty place to be.
post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'd rather you hadn't quoted him, and there's no reason to defend me. His opinion is of no importance to me whatsoever and he simply repeats himself for the most part. He's completely irrelevant to my place in life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

There are two types of people I disagree with here...one type I respect (and thankfully are the majority as beyond the bullshit this is a rather mature board with rather mature people)

anonymouse is not a respectable poster. He's a step above Apple ][ which, being just a step, is a pretty shitty place to be.

I love it when you guys get all chummy and into the whole bonding thing.
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