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CES: Apple's Siri prompts competitors to push their own voice controls

post #1 of 61
Thread Starter 
Though Apple is not present at this year's Consumer Electronics Show, the company's influence is felt on many of the products there, particularly with respect to new voice control functionality found in smartphones and televisions.

Apple's Siri personal assistant feature found in the iPhone 4S sent competitors scrambling to unveil new voice control features at CES this week, according to Reuters. Spurred by consumer interest in Siri, electronics companies are making voice control an integral feature of computers, smartphones, and even television sets.

The consensus is competing voice control technology demonstrated at CES does not yet outperform Apple's Siri, but the expectation is companies will continue to invest in the technology and result in great improvements in the years to come. Nuance, which licenses its voice recognition technology to Apple for Siri, said competing smartphones with improved speech technology will arrive in the fall of 2012, or one year after Apple launched the iPhone 4S.

While voice control in smartphones is not new, one less common use of voice recognition is with television sets. New HDTVs coming this year from companies like Samsung and LG will feature voice control, aiming to simplify the living room experience.

And Nuance this week also announced Dragon TV, its new platform for voice-controlled television sets. With it, HDTVs could allow users to speak a task, such as "Watch 'Boardwalk Empire,'" to initiate playback.

The product unveilings come as Apple is rumored to be working on a full-fledged television set that will feature Siri, allowing users to control their TV with just their voice. Last year, it was also said that current HDTV makers were scrambling to compete with Apple's rumored television set, even though no concrete information is yet available.

The response is similar to 2010, when rumors of an Apple tablet were swirling, but the iPad had not yet been announced. At that year's CES keynote, Microsoft introduced the HP Slate running Windows 7, a device that failed to see any real success. Apple's iPad, of course, went on to define the tablet market, and still controls the lion's share of sales.

Samsung's 2012 lineup will fend off rumors of an Apple television with "smart interaction" features, allowing users to launch and use applications on their HDTV through voice control, motion control and face recognition. Apple's rival also introduced its "Smart Evolution" concept, allowing select 2012 Samsung TVs to be "reborn" each year by installing kits and upgrading their TV set, rather than buying an entirely new model.



"In this era of smart entertainment, consumers are changing the way they want to be entertained and how they choose to access this content,” said Hyun-suk Kim, executive vice president, Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics. "Samsung is redefining what a TV can do so people can use more intuitive ways to control their entertainment experiences, maintain closer contact to people that are important to them, and easily manage and share content across multiple screens."

New 2012 television sets from LG Electronics will be powered by the LG Dual Core chipset, allowing faster loading speeds, as well as voice recognition technology built in to the new 4-mode "Magic Remote." With LG's new remote, users will be able to speak, gesture, or even point at their TV set to control it.

"LG continues to innovate in the TV space, bringing to market sleek new designs with technological advances such as 3D and Smart TV," said Tim Alessi, Director of New Product Development, Home Electronics, LG Electronics USA. "This is just the beginning of another exciting year for LG as we look to deliver new products that meet the needs of consumers’ growing appetite for theater-quality products in the home."
post #2 of 61
Talking to your TV won't go mainstream for another 25 years or more. The technology is just not good enough yet and is too highly dependent on your accent and other dynamics. I don't see Siri as the reason Steve said Apple's "finally cracked it". I believe 'finally cracked it' has probably something to do with a new "home screen" type of layout that happens to work wonderfully on a television.

Even with regards the iPhone 4S, Siri is a secondary UI, and this is on a device designed to be talked into.

We all know the real issue facing iTV, it's Apple securing a subscription TV show deal. Make no mistake about it, this is what's holding up iTV. Without all of the best TV shows at a decent subscription price, Apple may as well be designing the world's coolest pool without the water to fill it.
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #3 of 61
For all we know, Apple may be working on a TV but may not release it this year, or next year.

Microsoft announced Windows Tablet PC in back in 2001. Apple only released iPad in 2010, or 9 years after its competitors.

I think Apple will only introduce a TV when it found a way to unify the user interface of various content sources.
post #4 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Talking to your TV won't go mainstream for another 25 years or more.

And by the time anything like that remotely happens, the concept of "TV" will be utterly different than that of today.

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post #5 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

And by the time anything like that remotely happens, the concept of "TV" will be utterly different than that of today.

Utterly different? I submit that in 25 years TVs will still primarily be used to watch TV Shows. How the videos get onto that big screen is irrelevant in the grand scheme of things.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #6 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Utterly different? I submit that in 25 years TVs will still primarily be used to watch TV Shows.

What we think of as the TV ecosystem will be different. There won't be cable or satellite providers pushing their nonsensical packages.

And the landscape of shows will change when people don't have to pay for stuff they don't like.

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post #7 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

What we think of as the TV ecosystem will be different. There won't be cable or satellite providers pushing their nonsensical packages.

And the landscape of shows will change when people don't have to pay for stuff they don't like.

Well yeah, that'll happen. It'll still be TV though.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #8 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Utterly different? I submit that in 25 years TVs will still primarily be used to watch TV Shows. How the videos get onto that big screen is irrelevant in the grand scheme of things.

Technology moves so fast, I don't know that it would take so long as 25 years to make this realistic, though I'd want a real demo to see how well it works now. If the TV can work nearly as well as what they show in that video, with no seeming interference from the TV's own speakers, etc., and the motion control works well, this will be quite impressive. If Apple can come up with something that shines beyond that - so much the better.
post #9 of 61
Why didn't Apple buy Nuance? Apple knew that after they launched Siri all their competitors would start using Nuance to compete with them.

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post #10 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Why didn't Apple buy Nuance? Apple knew that after they launched Siri all their competitors would start using Nuance to compete with them.

Most likely, Nuance didn't want to sell.
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post #11 of 61
voice command of a TV will not work, how do you separated the voices on TV over your own voice when trying to give it a command. The only way to do this is lots of training of the system. The problem with most voice systems for them to work really well you have to go through long training periods.

Also the motion sensing for fine control of clicking on a button or other interactive items on the screen are going to be troublesome. It definitely neat but is laden with problem once moved into a real world home and real world issue, yeah probably work nice in a remove isolated from you family but then what happen when they all walk in and start talking and moving their arms and hands around.
post #12 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Why didn't Apple buy Nuance? Apple knew that after they launched Siri all their competitors would start using Nuance to compete with them.

Because Siri isn't voice recognition, or even voice control. It's a natural language processing system. So, even if competitors license the same voice recognition system, they won't have "Siri". What Nuance provides is the easy part.
post #13 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

voice command of a TV will not work, how do you separated the voices on TV over your own voice when trying to give it a command. ...

This is likely a trivial problem, easily solved by a) microphone design and/or b) canceling out the input that matches the output.
post #14 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

This is likely a trivial problem, easily solved by a) microphone design and/or b) canceling out the input that matches the output.

You are right - this is an easy problem to overcome. Additionally, you need a begin command so that the television will start to process what you say next. This will seperate commands from general conversation in the room.
post #15 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

voice command of a TV will not work, how do you separated the voices on TV over your own voice when trying to give it a command. The only way to do this is lots of training of the system. The problem with most voice systems for them to work really well you have to go through long training periods.

Also the motion sensing for fine control of clicking on a button or other interactive items on the screen are going to be troublesome. It definitely neat but is laden with problem once moved into a real world home and real world issue, yeah probably work nice in a remove isolated from you family but then what happen when they all walk in and start talking and moving their arms and hands around.

It would depend on how they choose to do voice source isolation - if they tie it into a mic on a remote that would allow greater isolation, or it could be isolated via iPad/iPhone/iPod Touch based Siri controls, or simply directional mic - to name a few. You can also do engagement acknowedgement eg: you - "Siri" Siri - "yes?" you - "switch channel to HG network" Siri - "switching channel to HG network".

Most current voice system are different than Siri (as anonymouse noted) as they are voice recognition/control systems which rely on keywording, not (as Siri is) a natural language intelligent agent system. As systems themselves become more sophisticated (vis a vis CPU processing speed and capacity and storage, as well as more fast network based resources) more intelligent agency is possible, and resolution of ambiguious or partially masked communication is possible. Remember, natural language has contextual drivers as well, not just keywords, and intelligent agents build logical mechanisms around context among other things.

Previous posts and threads correctly identified the challenge to intelligent agent operations - data, data and more data. The increasing sophistication of our processors allow better approaches to making this real and fully functional, because they are better equipped to handle that much data.

As for motion sensing, Microsoft has already breached that barrier with the consumer-driven Kinnect system. It's a bit kludgey but it is starting down the right path of gesture recognition. Further refinements are possible, especially as our various devices take on a higher level of interaction. But human device interaction requires increasing level of integration of input diversity: touch+voice+gesture+context, etc.
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post #16 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

This is likely a trivial problem, easily solved by a) microphone design and/or b) canceling out the input that matches the output.

How would they do this in a family setting? Everyone talking at once and you want to change the channel? If you have to hold a microphone/remote to do this it will fail..... I am not sure voice control/recognition is mature enough to handle all the background/TV noise that happens in a normal family setting....kids....other adults....pets....normal chatter....

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post #17 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by geekdad View Post

How would they do this in a family setting? Everyone talking at once and you want to change the channel? If you have to hold a microphone/remote to do this it will fail..... I am not sure voice control/recognition is mature enough to handle all the background/TV noise that happens in a normal family setting....kids....other adults....pets....normal chatter....

That's a different and more complex problem than the issue I was responding to.
post #18 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairb View Post

You are right - this is an easy problem to overcome. Additionally, you need a begin command so that the television will start to process what you say next. This will seperate commands from general conversation in the room.

Maybe...but what about when you say "Siri" to start the commands then your dog starts barking or the TV program you are watching has dialog similar to what you would normally say? What if your 4 year old starts talking to you or your other older kids are having a conversation right next to you? How would it differeniate their voices from yours?

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post #19 of 61
Hi, long time lurker, first time poster.

This site makes me laugh some times, the way everything is spun to be a positive for Apple, even if the story is nothing to do with Apple.

Do you not think maybe the whole integrated TV voice control is more related to Microsoft Kinect than Siri? You know, that thing that got released 8 months before Siri and allowed you to control your Xbox and play content using your voice. It does hold the record for the 'fastest selling consumer electronics device', so a lot of people might see a future in it. But I guess you may not have heard of this device, as it's not made by Apple.

Also it's funny how it's stated that the smart TVs are a response to Apples rumoured proper TV. Yes those working devices that are being demoed and will be released soon are a response to some vapour ware that is only at prototype stage. You don't think maybe Samsung, Google etc were thinking about it BEFORE Apple? Seeing as Google is getting itself integrated into other manufactures TVs already says to me that they are ahead of the game and Apple may be left behind if it doesn't get in quick.

Oh, before anyone says I'm a Troll or a hater I'd like to point out that I own almost exclusively apple products, other than a laptop I need for work. Also I will be the first in the queue to get an Apple TV (box, not TV proper) once an A5 powered 1080p version is released.
post #20 of 61
All this time, money and effort going into develop a new way to control your TV. There really is nothing wrong with the way we control TV's today. All this effort should be directed at the quality and the delivery of the content. We need ala carte programming and we need a better way to gauge who is watching what, rather than letting Neilson lead the networks to the decision to cancel the better quality programs. I am sure any and all shows will gain a wider audience if that audience is allowed to watch the program at their convenience rather than when some network programmer thinks it should be made available for a one time viewing.
post #21 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Healthy-Cynic View Post

Do you not think maybe the whole integrated TV voice control is more related to Microsoft Kinect than Siri? You know, that thing that got released 8 months before Siri and allowed you to control your Xbox and play content using your voice. It does hold the record for the 'fastest selling consumer electronics device', so a lot of people might see a future in it. But I guess you may not have heard of this device, as it's not made by Apple.

Don't patronize us. Siri has absolutely nothing to do with Kinect.

Quote:
You don't think maybe Samsung, Google etc were thinking about it BEFORE Apple?

Since you can't prove that and since no one can prove that Apple is even making an HDTV, I think this argument is moot.

Quote:
Oh, before anyone says I'm a Troll or a hater I'd like to point out that I own almost exclusively apple

And only the trolls and haters have to qualify their posts by saying that.

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post #22 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Don't patronize us. Siri has absolutely nothing to do with Kinect.

Yes correct, it doesn't. However the post was saying that voice control in TV was because of Siri. I would argue that it's nothing to do with Siri. It's more likely that it's to do with Kinect, which was doing voice (and gesture) controlled TV content almost a year before Siri was shown to the world. But this being Apple insider everything has to be spun to be down to an Apple innovation, which I find laughable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Since you can't prove that and since no one can prove that Apple is even making an HDTV, I think this argument is moot.

No again you've just proved my point for me. No one can prove that Apple is making a HDTV and yet Samsung, LG etc have already got smart TVs ready to roll. Yet Apple insider claims they are doing it because of Apple TV rumours. The R&D and design time needed for new devices makes this argument totally illogical, as the other manufactures are getting to market first.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

And only the trolls and haters have to qualify their posts by saying that.

Not at all. Simply that I was making a first post that I thought was likely to get some backs up and I assumed that many people would dismiss me as an alias or a troll. I am neither, just a healthy cynic.
post #23 of 61
So Apple's only almost 20 years later...

Quote:
Originally Posted by winstein2010 View Post

For all we know, Apple may be working on a TV but may not release it this year, or next year.

Microsoft announced Windows Tablet PC in back in 2001. Apple only released iPad in 2010, or 9 years after its competitors.

I think Apple will only introduce a TV when it found a way to unify the user interface of various content sources.
post #24 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Healthy-Cynic View Post

But this being Apple insider everything has to be spun to be down to an Apple innovation, which I find laughable.

Explain how voice control and physical control have anything to do with one another or how they're remotely part of the "same" innovation.

Quote:
No again you've just proved my point for me.

Not in the slightest… I think we're making different arguments here.

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post #25 of 61
Hmm, so what happens when a TV show has a character that says "turn the TV off", "Change the channel", "turn up the volume"?


Will the voice recognition be smart enough to know it is the show and not the watcher?
post #26 of 61
When did innovation mean "try everything under the sun, throw it at the wall and see which one sticks" ? None of these companies are innovating... they are just taking ideas and features that are currently industry buzzwords and shoving them inside their devices.

And of course, Samsung is the worst of the lot. Really? Motion control? Every time I reach up to pick my nose will the channel change on me?

I suppose this is typical of CE manufacturers and why Apple will be able to swoop down with a very limited set of refined features and redefine the industry. Because they have the discipline to say no to all the wrong things and yes to the few that really matter.
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post #27 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by aknabi View Post

So Apple's only almost 20 years later...

Which begs the question, why did only a few nerds buy these "tablets" for bragging rights only apparently? Twenty years later Apple is selling them by the millions. The constant drone of the Apple haters about tablets and voice commands and GUIs and mice and-and-and being around years before Apple is pretty pathetic when you think about it. Why did it take an Apple to bring these technologies to the mass market and make them common place? Xerox had no clue what to do with their GUI and mouse. Microsoft and its partners had no clue (and still don't) about how to produce a tablet that people would want to buy. The list goes on. So can we just stop with the "so-and-so did it years before Apple" nonsense. Please.
post #28 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by airnerd View Post

Hmm, so what happens when a TV show has a character that says "turn the TV off", "Change the channel", "turn up the volume"?

For the sound generated by the TV:

Will the voice recognition be smart enough to know it is the show and not the watcher?



Quote:
Sound is a P-wave, which consists of a compression phase and a rarefaction phase. A noise-cancellation speaker emits a sound wave with the same amplitude but with inverted phase (also known as antiphase) to the original sound. The waves combine to form a new wave, in a process called interference, and effectively cancel each other out - an effect which is called phase cancellation.

Modern active noise control is generally achieved through the use of analog circuits or Digital Signal Processing. Adaptive algorithms are designed to analyze the waveform of the background aural or nonaural noise, then based on the specific algorithm generates a signal that will either phase shift or invert the polarity of the original signal. This inverted signal (in antiphase) is then amplified and a transducer creates a sound wave directly proportional to the amplitude of the original waveform creating destructive interference. This will effectively reduce the volume of the perceivable noise.

Active noise control


...Or, just listen to the LSU cheering section


And for other noise in the room:

Quote:
The development is a special case of the differential microphone topology most commonly used to achieve directionality. All such microphones have at least two ports through which sound enters; a front port normally oriented toward the desired sound and another port that's more distant. The microphone's diaphragm is placed between the two ports; sound arriving from an ambient sound field reaches both ports more or less equally. Sound that's much closer to the front port than to the rear will make more of a pressure gradient between the front and back of the diaphragm, causing it to move more. The microphone's proximity effect is adjusted so that flat frequency response is achieved for sound sources very close to the front of the mic – typically 1 to 3 cm. Sounds arriving from other angles are subject to steep midrange and bass rolloff. Commercially and militarily useful noise-canceling microphones have been made since the 1940s by Roanwell,[1] Electro-Voice and others.

Another technique uses two or more microphones and active or passive circuitry to reduce the noise. The primary microphone is closer to the desired source (like a person's mouth). A second mic receives ambient noise. In a noisy environment, both microphones receive noise at a similar level, but the primary mic receives the desired sounds more strongly. Thus if one signal is subtracted from the other (in the simplest sense, by connecting the microphones out of phase) much of the noise is canceled while the desired sound is retained. Other techniques may be used as well, such as using a directional primary mic, to maximize the difference between the two signals and make the cancellation easier to do.
The internal electronic circuitry of an active noise-canceling mic attempts to subtract noise signal from the primary microphone. The circuit may employ passive or active noise canceling techniques to filter out the noise, producing an output signal that has a lower noise floor and a higher signal-to-noise ratio.

Noise-canceling microphone


Anecdotal

My normal position is 6 feet in front of the HDTV. I frequently use Siri while the TV is running, and rarely have problems.

It may be related to the position of the iP4 Mic, the difference in distance of the sound source... or special programming within the iP4.

The iP4 contains fast graphic cores and a few DSP chips that could be used to cancel ambient noise.


Edit: Found this:

Apple selected leading Audience noise cancellation technology for iPhone 4

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post #29 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by airnerd View Post

Hmm, so what happens when a TV show has a character that says "turn the TV off", "Change the channel", "turn up the volume"?

...

... or worse : Energize !
post #30 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post




My normal position is 6 feet in front of the HDTV. I frequently use Siri while the TV is running, and rarely have problems.

It may be related to the position of the iP4 Mic, the difference in distance of the sound source... or special programming within the iP4.

The iP4 contains fast graphic cores and a few DSP chips that could be used to cancel ambient noise.


When you are 6 feet in front of the TV....how close to your mouth are you holding your phone so Siri can complete your commands? Would you hold a mic/remote that clsoe to control your HD TV? Are there other people/family in the room?
Siri (for me anyways) has problems when there are other voices that are close by.....
Here is a link to VLINGO from CES and what they are doing. The Nuance company (Siri technology) seesm to be buying them...

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/tech...v-viewing.html

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post #31 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Because Siri isn't voice recognition, or even voice control. It's a natural language processing system. So, even if competitors license the same voice recognition system, they won't have "Siri". What Nuance provides is the easy part.

I get that Nuance is just the "easy" voice recognition part of the equation, that's for sure. But it would be a lot harder on Siri competitors if they had no access to Nuance technology.

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post #32 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by geekdad View Post

When you are 6 feet in front of the TV....how close to your mouth are you holding your phone so Siri can complete your commands? Would you hold a mic/remote that clsoe to control your HD TV? Are there other people/family in the room?
Siri (for me anyways) has problems when there are other voices that are close by.....

I just measured it...

The TV is 4 1/2 feet away -- 45 degrees to my left.

The iP4 is 8 inches away -- 60 degrees down towards my lap.

As for ambient noise...

In the family room where the HDTV is located there is an iMac, 1-5 iPads, 1-5 phones, 1-5 iPods, 2 cats, 1 dog, 1-5 people (including 2 teens and a 12-year-old)...

Within earshot are 2 other computers and 2 stereos...

We don't know the meaning of background noise!
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post #33 of 61

Then there's the story about the Frenchman who programmed La Marseillaise as the ringtone on this smart phone.

He was in the bathroom, when the phone rang... The rest is history

Be careful out there!
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post #34 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by geekdad View Post

When you are 6 feet in front of the TV....how close to your mouth are you holding your phone so Siri can complete your commands? Would you hold a mic/remote that clsoe to control your HD TV? Are there other people/family in the room?
Siri (for me anyways) has problems when there are other voices that are close by.....
Here is a link to VLINGO from CES and what they are doing. The Nuance company (Siri technology) seesm to be buying them...

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/tech...v-viewing.html

Same here. I was in a restaurant and trying to show off Siri. I said a command and she kept thinking or something. Finally what she "heard" popped up and it was my command and a few lines of lyrics from the song in the background. I never even noticed music was on, but she picked up the lyrics.
post #35 of 61
Sounds like a desperate grab for mind share. These days, Sony is more likely to throw in technology like voice without much regard to how it will be used. It's a checklist feature.

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post #36 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by airnerd View Post

Hmm, so what happens when a TV show has a character that says "turn the TV off", "Change the channel", "turn up the volume"?


Will the voice recognition be smart enough to know it is the show and not the watcher?

I'm sure if there is a voice controlled system like SIRI that all the sounds coming out from the tv itself will be processed through a system that will cancel out those words and sounds.

Which then only leaves the room to deal with oh and GHOSTS..lol
post #37 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Don't patronize us.

Hahahaa hilarious! The 'us' indicates the mob culture here is rife! "If you say anything against our beloved Apple, then you must DIE"!! Hahaha

This guy is a long time lurker, he provides a difference of opinion or new angle and he is ousted from the group immediatly for being a defector or something. Pathetic attack on your part Skil. Do you beat up small children for their candy too?

In response to the article, it is clear Apple have once again developed something exciting and superior to everyone else's solution. It has caused everyone to follow them and try to beat it once again. Which they will find difficult cause Apple want to make cool, functional life-enhancing solutions compared to everyone else who is playing catchup. Siri or equivalent capability will surely feature in everything we own from toasters to TV eventually. We'll figure out all the details like familys all talking at once and so on but its clearly a winner system that the world wants to be a part of. Well done Apple.

I got to say that Siri has a hard time with me sometimes. My Brit accent while living in America means i have to use that man voice (urgh) and cant use the Yelp integration. Grrr its right maybe 80% of the time but its early days and will improve. Its exciting to live in such times and experience technology moving at the speed it does. 10 years ago give or tKe i bought a vibrating battery for my nokia 67something. I thought that was cutting edge. The other seek i booked flights on my phone!
post #38 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by geekdad View Post

Here is a link to VLINGO from CES and what they are doing. The Nuance company (Siri technology) seesm to be buying them...

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/tech...v-viewing.html

Several things:

1) He held the remote 2-4 inches from his mouth

2) there was no sound emanating from the TV (I guess he just wanted to watch TV -- not to listen to the shows too)

3) there was no ambient noise in the room.

4) mostly, it was analogous to:
-- speak a command
-- speech to text recognition
-- display a list of options
-- repeat

I suspect that Siri will be:
-- more conversational natural language
-- context aware
-- fewer steps - determine what you want and do it, as opposed to search and select drill-down

I have Vlingo -- slightly better than voice commands...

You can search the web and find Vlingo vs Siri (and other) comparisons -- Vlingo does poorly.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #39 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcasey View Post

I'm sure if there is a voice controlled system like SIRI that all the sounds coming out from the tv itself will be processed through a system that will cancel out those words and sounds.

Which then only leaves the room to deal with oh and GHOSTS..lol

and other people in the room...going through the room......talking on another phone while watching TV.....kids in the room....pets....in the room.....and where would this voice controlled system be housed? In the Tv set it self across the room? In the remote on the coffee table or on your lap or maybe in your hand? Will you have to speak into the remote? How will it get activated to follow your commands?

Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

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Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

Reply
post #40 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Several things:

1) He held the remote 2-4 inches from his mouth

2) there was no sound emanating from the TV (I guess he just wanted to watch TV -- not to listen to the shows too)

3) there was no ambient noise in the room.

4) mostly, it was analogous to:
-- speak a command
-- speech to text recognition
-- display a list of options
-- repeat

I suspect that Siri will be:
-- more conversational natural language
-- context aware
-- fewer steps - determine what you want and do it, as opposed to search and select drill-down

I have Vlingo -- slightly better than voice commands...

You can search the web and find Vlingo vs Siri (and other) comparisons -- Vlingo does poorly.

I agree..I have had Vlingo before and it does not work as well as Siri has..... But I like the direction Nuance is going.....if they are buying Vlingo then you can be sure they think Vlingo is onto something....after all they (Nuance) developed Siri technology in the first place

Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

Reply

Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

Reply
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