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T-Mobile CEO says frequency band issue is 'key reason' for lack of iPhone

post #1 of 36
Thread Starter 
T-Mobile CEO Philipp Humm said Tuesday that a frequency band incompatibility issue is the "key reason" keeping the carrier from offering the iPhone, noting that it will be resolved with future chipsets, potentially paving the way for Apple's handset to arrive on its network.

Humm said in an interview with AllThingsD that T-Mobile's unique frequency bands are the main factor preventing it from bringing the iPhone to its customers.

“The key reason we didn’t have the iPhone in the past is we are on different band than globally the market was,” he said. “That is something which will change over time. Chipsets are also evolving to be able to allow for more bands.”

The executive also reiterated that the decision is ultimately up to Apple. T-Mobile Chief Marketing Officer Cole Brodman had said last fall that the company would "love to have" the iPhone, noting that "the ball is in Apple's court."

Though some unlocked iPhone users on T-Mobile benefitted from a network adjustment last month that allowed them to take advantage of 3G speeds from the carrier, the scenario is said to be extremely rare. Unlocked GSM iPhones are compatible with T-Mobile's voice network, but are generally unable to make use of 3G functionality.

The fourth largest carrier in the U.S. is struggling to regroup after AT&T withdrew its bid last month to acquire the Deutsche Telekom subsidiary.

Federal regulators had opposed the acquisition on the grounds that AT&T hadn't provided sufficient evidence of benefits that would outweigh the removal of a competitor from the U.S. wireless market. AT&T paid T-Mobile a $4 billion break-up fee as a result of the failed $39 billion deal, which was first announced last March.

Humm confirmed on Tuesday that there is no "second AT&T deal" in the wings for the company, though he did note that the cash, spectrum and data-roaming agreement it has received from AT&T has been a boon. Moving forward, the CEO said T-Mobile will resume its advertising campaign that is critical of its competitors, positioning itself as a consumer-friendly network.

In the wake of the abortive merger, T-Mobile has found itself on the outside after rivals Verizon and Sprint began offering Apple's iPhone last year.

Verizon recently revealed that it had sold 4.2 million iPhones in the fourth quarter of 2011, doubling its sales from the previous quarter. By comparison, T-Mobile reported using 3G/4G smartphones in the third quarter of 2011.

T-Mobile could find itself falling even further behind as its larger competitors make the transition to 4G LTE. For the time being, T-Mobile plans to focus on its HSPA+ network, which it advertises as "4G," before eventually moving to LTE.

“We’re not against LTE,” Humm said. “We will over time evolve to LTE. We just don’t see a need to move there very fast.”

Recent reports have suggested that Apple could release an LTE-compatible iPhone later this year. The company has said it is waiting for LTE chipsets to improve before implementing them in its handsets.
post #2 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

“We’re not against LTE,” Humm said. “We will over time evolve to LTE. We just don’t see a need to move there very fast.”

Liar.

T-Mobile USA is not making a push into 4G LTE because it was too cheap/poor to buy any of the spectrum. AT&T finally bought some of their from Qualcomm (who abandoned their idea of becoming a mobile operator). Sprint has grimly accepted the fact that WiMax has lost and is in the expensive process of transitioning to LTE for 4G after having sunk it so much capital into ClearWire's WiMax infrastructure.

T-Mobile USA is twiddling its thumbs, waiting for AT&T to kick free some excess spectrum frequency so it can proceed with LTE deployment, rather than trying to reharvest existing spectrum in heavily oversubscribed key markets (which doesn't help anyone outside of those market). In the mean time, T-Mo USA is giving up marketshare, seeing churn increase, and watching their margins continue to erode.

T-Mobile USA can't move fast because it has nowhere to go.
post #3 of 36
I'm astounihes how long the US mrkelace is going to continue to actually believe these two Ben-counters about iPhones.... This game is all about flagelant egos - tht's it.... T-Mumble sucks , they know it, and are actual trying to be your local friendly third tier player and they like... The ghetto buner of Horne...

These are pathetic people. Apple should just buy them and dismiss the whole Lot of them to the ghetto.
post #4 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

T-Mobile CEO Philipp Humm said Tuesday that a frequency band incompatibility issue is the "key reason" keeping the carrier from offering the iPhone, noting that it will be resolved with future chipsets, potentially paving the way for Apple's handset to arrive on its network.

Yet another lie.

The current Qualcomm chip in the iPhone 4S supports all 5 bands. Apple chose to only have the iPhone support 4 bands specifically leaving out T-Mobile US 3G support.
post #5 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bwinski View Post

I'm astounihes how long the US mrkelace is going to continue to actually believe these two Ben-counters about iPhones.... This game is all about flagelant egos - tht's it.... T-Mumble sucks , they know it, and are actual trying to be your local friendly third tier player and they like... The ghetto buner of Horne...

These are pathetic people. Apple should just buy them and dismiss the whole Lot of them to the ghetto.

Can someone translate this for me?

Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

Reply

Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

Reply
post #6 of 36
Well DUH - I mean WHO would have dreamed that T-Mobile's wacko 1700 MHz frequency for 3G was the problem?? I NEVER would have guessed...
post #7 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalMacRat View Post

Yet another lie.

The current Qualcomm chip in the iPhone 4S supports all 5 bands. Apple chose to only have the iPhone support 4 bands specifically leaving out T-Mobile US 3G support.

As I said, I think Apple held off on releasing a T-Mobile compatible iPhone because somebody who works at a company whose name starts with A and ends with T whispered something about a planned acquisition into Steve Jobs' ear.

Now, the non-conspiratorially minded would say, well of course you hold off because you don't want to spend money developing and getting regulatory approval for a phone meant for a carrier that's about to disappear.

On the other hand, it's more interesting to say that it's just Apple & AT&T doing some quid in anticipation of some future quo. And now that the acquisition has crashed and burned, than Apple is free of any obligations and can now move ahead with a T-Mobile iPhone.
post #8 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalMacRat View Post

Yet another lie.

The current Qualcomm chip in the iPhone 4S supports all 5 bands. Apple chose to only have the iPhone support 4 bands specifically leaving out T-Mobile US 3G support.

Does that mean that all it would take for Apple to allow T-Mobile is a simple iPhone 4S (4?, 3GS?, ...) firmware upgrade?
post #9 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by VanFruniken View Post

Does that mean that all it would take for Apple to allow T-Mobile is a simple iPhone 4S (4?, 3GS?, ...) firmware upgrade?

Probably, but it would also require a commitment by T-Mobile to purchase X number of iPhones over the next Y number of years, as Sprint was required to do to join the iPhone party.

It's just my opinion, but this whole situation sounds like T-Mobile is trying to get a different deal that other US carriers made to get the iPhone on their network. They want the phone, they just don't want to pay for it. Since they've got a little additional scratch from the failed AT&T merger, doing an deal with Apple would be a good use for some of that money.
post #10 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by F1Ferrari View Post

Probably, but it would also require a commitment by T-Mobile to purchase X number of iPhones over the next Y number of years, as Sprint was required to do to join the iPhone party.

It's just my opinion, but this whole situation sounds like T-Mobile is trying to get a different deal that other US carriers made to get the iPhone on their network. They want the phone, they just don't want to pay for it. Since they've got a little additional scratch from the failed AT&T merger, doing an deal with Apple would be a good use for some of that money.

Doesn't T-M get 4 billion $ from this failed merger?
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
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Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
Reply
post #11 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

Liar.

T-Mobile USA is not making a push into 4G LTE because it was too cheap/poor to buy any of the spectrum. AT&T finally bought some of their from Qualcomm (who abandoned their idea of becoming a mobile operator). Sprint has grimly accepted the fact that WiMax has lost and is in the expensive process of transitioning to LTE for 4G after having sunk it so much capital into ClearWire's WiMax infrastructure.

T-Mobile USA is twiddling its thumbs, waiting for AT&T to kick free some excess spectrum frequency so it can proceed with LTE deployment, rather than trying to reharvest existing spectrum in heavily oversubscribed key markets (which doesn't help anyone outside of those market). In the mean time, T-Mo USA is giving up marketshare, seeing churn increase, and watching their margins continue to erode.

T-Mobile USA can't move fast because it has nowhere to go.

Yup, Duhhh T-Morrbile, this is what happens when you buy dumbass frequencies and don't invest in the right one.

As for WiMax though, I really am not sure how or why it "lost". Maybe someone can enlighten me.

I've spoken with two ex-ClearWire execs that are now involved in a 4G WiMax data/voice rollout in Malaysia. It really isn't too shabby. Some of the products are similar to Vivid Wireless in Australia, but the coverage for Vivid is not great. In Malaysia because a conglomerate which owns land, property, railroads and yada yada yada owns this 4G telco, the outdoor and in-building *data* coverage by now trounces the 3G providers (which are sitting on their butts riding on iPhone and Samsung). Voice coverage used to be spotty but has improved. They have about 400,000 subscribers out of a population of 30million, and they've only been in operation for a year. The other "big three" telcos in Malaysia have been around for decades.

However, again, does anyone know what is the deal with WiMax in Australia? It pales in comparison to Telstra NexG (3G on 850mhz etc).

Why is no one else around the world deploying converged data/voice WiMax in any significant way?

I know I've asked it many times, and people say, well LTE is fantastic, but then also posters have said, well, if you have HS-something-A 3G+ etc etc it's fine... And it is, where I am within 5km of CBD you can get 10mbit down on iPhone 4S tethering. But only on Telstra NexG, and at my apartment 10km from the CBD, only Telstra NexG actually has proper in-building coverage, everyone else in the building on Vodafone and Optus have to walk to the courtyard to get coverage.

And we still haven't seen any LTE phones besides HTC that are of any major sigficance, no? What's going on? Is it indeed a case of waiting for the baseband chipsets? Or telcos around the world now being able to squeeze the most out of 3G? Everyone waiting for Apple to release an LTE iPhone?
post #12 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkyMark7 View Post

Well DUH - I mean WHO would have dreamed that T-Mobile's wacko 1700 MHz frequency for 3G was the problem?? I NEVER would have guessed...

Darnit you pipped me to the post. "Wacko" frequency. Nice.
post #13 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by F1Ferrari View Post

Probably, but it would also require a commitment by T-Mobile to purchase X number of iPhones over the next Y number of years, as Sprint was required to do to join the iPhone party.

It's just my opinion, but this whole situation sounds like T-Mobile is trying to get a different deal that other US carriers made to get the iPhone on their network. They want the phone, they just don't want to pay for it. Since they've got a little additional scratch from the failed AT&T merger, doing an deal with Apple would be a good use for some of that money.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalMacRat View Post

Yet another lie.

The current Qualcomm chip in the iPhone 4S supports all 5 bands. Apple chose to only have the iPhone support 4 bands specifically leaving out T-Mobile US 3G support.

For the past several years till today I never understood T-Mobile's "play" in the US market. I mean, they are massive in Europe. In the US, they've been as frigid as a bookworm on prom night.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bwinski View Post

I'm astounihes how long the US mrkelace is going to continue to actually believe these two Ben-counters about iPhones.... This game is all about flagelant egos - tht's it.... T-Mumble sucks , they know it, and are actual trying to be your local friendly third tier player and they like... The ghetto buner of Horne...

These are pathetic people. Apple should just buy them and dismiss the whole Lot of them to the ghetto.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickprinter View Post

Can someone translate this for me?

I'll try. "I'm astonished at how long the US marketplace is going to believe the analysts that iPhones drive subscribers. This game is all about [something] egos. T-Mobile sucks, and they know it, they're just trying to get by being a side player. The [mumble mumble]... Apple should buy T-Mobile [or the analysts, not sure what he's referring to] and drag them all to the Trash."
post #14 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

Liar.

T-Mobile USA is not making a push into 4G LTE because it was too cheap/poor to buy any of the spectrum. AT&T finally bought some of their from Qualcomm (who abandoned their idea of becoming a mobile operator). Sprint has grimly accepted the fact that WiMax has lost and is in the expensive process of transitioning to LTE for 4G after having sunk it so much capital into ClearWire's WiMax infrastructure.

T-Mobile USA is twiddling its thumbs, waiting for AT&T to kick free some excess spectrum frequency so it can proceed with LTE deployment, rather than trying to reharvest existing spectrum in heavily oversubscribed key markets (which doesn't help anyone outside of those market). In the mean time, T-Mo USA is giving up marketshare, seeing churn increase, and watching their margins continue to erode.

T-Mobile USA can't move fast because it has nowhere to go.

Agreed. T-Mobile bragged when they spent $10+ Billion in an earlier spectrum grab and that really turned out to be a very expensive purchase. They are dead weight to their parent company.
post #15 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by boeyc15 View Post

Doesn't T-M get 4 billion $ from this failed merger?

I believe it was just over $2 billion, yet there are circumstances more than just a a failed merger on the face of it for them to qualify for the funds.
post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by VanFruniken View Post

Does that mean that all it would take for Apple to allow T-Mobile is a simple iPhone 4S (4?, 3GS?, ...) firmware upgrade?

That would just enable physical support - Apple would still have to optimize the device and test it - it wouldnt work too well otherwise. It would probably be an addition cost for apple - they likely got a break on the chipset from disabling T-mobile frequencies.
post #17 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by F1Ferrari View Post

Probably, but it would also require a commitment by T-Mobile to purchase X number of iPhones over the next Y number of years, as Sprint was required to do to join the iPhone party.

It's just my opinion, but this whole situation sounds like T-Mobile is trying to get a different deal that other US carriers made to get the iPhone on their network. They want the phone, they just don't want to pay for it. Since they've got a little additional scratch from the failed AT&T merger, doing an deal with Apple would be a good use for some of that money.

I thought the same thing until I saw that US Cellular plans on having the iPhone, too. there's no way US Cellular can commit to the same number of phones that T-Mobile could, let alone Sprint.
post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Why is no one else around the world deploying converged data/voice WiMax in any significant way?

...

Everyone waiting for Apple to release an LTE iPhone?

Two factors are in play. #1 Wimax was designed for backhaul originally. It's too inefficient to be used for customer terminals in the same way Cable companies don't give everyone the maximum bandwidth and then force hundreds of customers to share the same 100mbit pipe in the neighborhood. Using Wimax for mobile devices is rather silly since they get allocated bandwidth they can't possibly use. Wimax is useful in countries like Canada and Australia where there may be miles between towers, and running backhaul to every tower is not cost effective.

LTE is the better technology (by virtue of everyone using it and it being ALL-IP,) don't listen to the business pundits about WiMax. They don't understand the technology, just hype. WiMax is not a "cell phone" technology. It's more like a "cable/dsl modem" replacement and doesn't have all the "phone" legacy baggage.


The other reason, is that existing GSM carriers (or worse, CDMA2000 carriers) only have limited spectrum. Look at the balkanized state of US cellular coverage already.

What we've seen with Apple, is that they had the balls to not jump into every stupid carrier-specific flavor of a standard. They picked the most standard version (GSM quad-band) and went from there. The Verizon/Sprint Model of the iPhone 4 uses a MDM6600, which supports GSM. It's in fact this is almost same chip used in the iPhone 4S (MDM6610.) Both chips support 2100Mhz in UMTS, but not 1700Mhz(AWS band) used at T-mobile.

Some speculation (I haven't seen any documented proof of it working) is that the chip supports 1700Mhz, but doesn't have the required radio firmware to access it. In theory it's just a firmware update that can enable it. Radio firmware is notoriously "secret" (or so I hear) because government regulators don't want people broadcasting on frequencies they don't have licence to use. Just look at all the Patent lawsuits.
post #19 of 36
Considering the fact that AT&T will be using AWS for part of its 4G LTE network, there's a very good chance that Apple is finally convinced to put in support for 1700Mhz in their next iPhone.
post #20 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkyMark7 View Post

Well DUH - I mean WHO would have dreamed that T-Mobile's wacko 1700 MHz frequency for 3G was the problem?? I NEVER would have guessed...

You do realize that it is the US government that allows AT&T to "own" a monopoly on the standard GSM/3G frequencies in the US, right?

In other countries, multiple carriers use the same GSM/3G frequencies.
post #21 of 36
Well, my wife would love it if the iPhone came to tmobile. She is a lifetime tmobile customer and gets a great price; but she has a my touch 4g that at least 4 times a day she yells at because it's a pile o junk! Just last night the screen would turn off 5 digits into dialing a phone number. It freezes constantly, it's super slow, like finish typing your sentence and watch it slowly appear, like an old selectric typewriter. I have to take the battery out at least once a day oh, and the battery life sucks, it nearly always dead or sitting on the charger, plus the touch screen is slightly inaccurate so browsing the web is frustrating.

Google navigation is really cool though, best feature on android IMO

She loves my 4s, it takes better pics than our old point & shoot (great for the kids) plus I go weeks without restarting it. it never freezes, and the battery lasts longer.
Just wish it had better NAV
post #22 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalMacRat View Post

You do realize that it is the US government that allows AT&T to "own" a monopoly on the standard GSM/3G frequencies in the US, right?

In other countries, multiple carriers use the same GSM/3G frequencies.

AT&T's failed acquisition of T-Mobile USA will change that.

If I recall correctly, the agreement stated that in the event that the merger fell through T-Mobile USA will receive cash as well as some spectrum allocation. Also, AT&T said there would be some roaming agreements between the two carriers.
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalMacRat View Post

Yet another lie.

The current Qualcomm chip in the iPhone 4S supports all 5 bands. Apple chose to only have the iPhone support 4 bands specifically leaving out T-Mobile US 3G support.

Are you certain? I thought the Qualcomm chip supported all 5 bands but the phone itself (or chipset as a whole) was only a quadband implementation for all the other RF receiver/transmitter and filter circuitry. I thought they that they traded band IV (1700/AWS) for band VIII (900/GSM).

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkyMark7 View Post

Well DUH - I mean WHO would have dreamed that T-Mobile's wacko 1700 MHz frequency for 3G was the problem?? I NEVER would have guessed...

Did they have a choice?

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

Liar.

T-Mobile USA is not making a push into 4G LTE because it was too cheap/poor to buy any of the spectrum. AT&T finally bought some of their from Qualcomm (who abandoned their idea of becoming a mobile operator). Sprint has grimly accepted the fact that WiMax has lost and is in the expensive process of transitioning to LTE for 4G after having sunk it so much capital into ClearWire's WiMax infrastructure.

T-Mobile USA is twiddling its thumbs, waiting for AT&T to kick free some excess spectrum frequency so it can proceed with LTE deployment, rather than trying to reharvest existing spectrum in heavily oversubscribed key markets (which doesn't help anyone outside of those market). In the mean time, T-Mo USA is giving up marketshare, seeing churn increase, and watching their margins continue to erode.

T-Mobile USA can't move fast because it has nowhere to go.

You guys keep saying T-Mobile is giving up market share, but the evidence doesn't support that. It added 126, 000 subscribers last quarter. Moreover, until recently 4G wasn't officially defined. HSPA+ (which T-Mobile uses) satisfied the definition for 4G (it might even still). Like Apple, T-Mobile has quite a few loyal customers, myself included. If it had an iPhone, I'd lock myself into a contract. Until then I will just used unlocked iPhones (and pay much less).

Further, for the last year T-Mobile was planning to be bought out, so investing in frequency would have made zero sense.

Since the AT&T deal is off the table, T-Mobile has 1) benefited from AT&T spectrum, and 2) has started to reposition spectrum. I'd be amazed if in 2012 T-Mobile doesn't get the iPhone. DT (T-Mobile's parent) is a big partner in Europe for Apple.
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by jvanleuvan View Post

Well, my wife would love it if the iPhone came to tmobile. She is a lifetime tmobile customer and gets a great price; but she has a my touch 4g that at least 4 times a day she yells at because it's a pile o junk! Just last night the screen would turn off 5 digits into dialing a phone number. It freezes constantly, it's super slow, like finish typing your sentence and watch it slowly appear, like an old selectric typewriter. I have to take the battery out at least once a day oh, and the battery life sucks, it nearly always dead or sitting on the charger, plus the touch screen is slightly inaccurate so browsing the web is frustrating.

Google navigation is really cool though, best feature on android IMO

She loves my 4s, it takes better pics than our old point & shoot (great for the kids) plus I go weeks without restarting it. it never freezes, and the battery lasts longer.
Just wish it had better NAV


get her an unlocked iPhone. I use it on T-Mobile and love it. I actually have a 3Gs and iPhone 4 working on T-Mobile.
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hudson1 View Post

I thought the same thing until I saw that US Cellular plans on having the iPhone, too. there's no way US Cellular can commit to the same number of phones that T-Mobile could, let alone Sprint.

US Cellular has two things going for it. First, Apple doesn't have to make any changes to the phone for it to work. Two, it operates in an area where Sprint isn't a big contender.
post #28 of 36
Anyone think that it MIGHT be because T-Mobile cannot support the increased bandwidth? I mean, nobody uses their phones like iPhone users.

T-Mobile probably figures they won't capture a lot of market-share and they would have to deal with a doubling of usage.

Their target market is budget-conscious, so perhaps Android phones are good enough.
post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalMacRat View Post

You do realize that it is the US government that allows AT&T to "own" a monopoly on the standard GSM/3G frequencies in the US, right?

In other countries, multiple carriers use the same GSM/3G frequencies.

I've pointed this out many times, glad someone repeated it.

The US must go to general auction to 3-5 carriers, auctioning all standard world-frequencies. As it is now, it is anti-capitalist, pro-monopoly, anti-competitive and just hampering US tech and US companies.
post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

Liar.

T-Mobile USA is not making a push into 4G LTE because it was too cheap/poor to buy any of the spectrum. AT&T finally bought some of their from Qualcomm (who abandoned their idea of becoming a mobile operator). Sprint has grimly accepted the fact that WiMax has lost and is in the expensive process of transitioning to LTE for 4G after having sunk it so much capital into ClearWire's WiMax infrastructure.

T-Mobile USA is twiddling its thumbs, waiting for AT&T to kick free some excess spectrum frequency so it can proceed with LTE deployment, rather than trying to reharvest existing spectrum in heavily oversubscribed key markets (which doesn't help anyone outside of those market). In the mean time, T-Mo USA is giving up marketshare, seeing churn increase, and watching their margins continue to erode.

T-Mobile USA can't move fast because it has nowhere to go.

T-Mobile is about to lose a long term customer over their lollygagging around. Though I don't like what I know about other networks and have had generally a good experience with T-Mobile, I do want an iphone and will go elsewhere if I need to get it. I've been month to month for a long time, thought the potential merger might get the iphone for me, but since that is off, it looks like move or do without. I don't like either option much but won't wait forever either for T-Mobile to get its act together.
post #31 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fake_William_Shatner View Post

Anyone think that it MIGHT be because T-Mobile cannot support the increased bandwidth? I mean, nobody uses their phones like iPhone users.

T-Mobile probably figures they won't capture a lot of market-share and they would have to deal with a doubling of usage.

Their target market is budget-conscious, so perhaps Android phones are good enough.

I won't go android, anything that is as prone to virus and malware as android is, isn't worth the trouble. I have my pc locked down tight but I don't want a phone I have to run a firewall, malware and antivirus on, all that would take up my 2GB allowance in a week, lol...
post #32 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by genej101 View Post

I do want an iphone and will go elsewhere if I need to get it. I've been month to month for a long time,

Why do you think you need to go elsewhere?

Just buy an unlocked iPhone 3GS directly from Apple and stick in your T-Mobile SIM.

Easy as that.
post #33 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

get her an unlocked iPhone. I use it on T-Mobile and love it. I actually have a 3Gs and iPhone 4 working on T-Mobile.

I thought that the iPhone wouldnt work on t mobile?
Hmm, might have to think about that, it would still be nice to get the subsidy though.

Does a iphone4 work on tmobile?

Thanks
post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by jvanleuvan View Post

I thought that the iPhone wouldnt work on t mobile?
Hmm, might have to think about that, it would still be nice to get the subsidy though.

Does a iphone4 work on tmobile?

All iPhones work on T-Mobile. (I use a 3GS on T-Mobile.)

The issue is that Apple doesn't support the 1700MHz frequency needed for 3G data.

EDGE data and voice work just fine.

The only issue with the iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S is that they use micro SIMs. T-Mobile does provide micro SIMs to their stores, but not all store employees may be aware of that. Worst case you would have to cut a regular SIM to fit.
post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by jvanleuvan View Post

I thought that the iPhone wouldnt work on t mobile?
Hmm, might have to think about that, it would still be nice to get the subsidy though.

Does a iphone4 work on tmobile?

Thanks



I agree about the subsidy in the sense that it is nice to have choice. I have a friend on AT&T who upgrades his iPhones every year. I have bought his, unlocked them, and put them on T-Mobile. You actually still save money over two years if you bought the iPhones unlocked directly from Apple and signed up for a T-Moble's value plan, which are meant for people who bring their own phones to the Network so the plans are cheaper.

Yes, the iPhone absolutely works on T-Mobile. The voice service where I live (in Ann Arbor Michigan) is better on T-Mobile than AT&T. The iPhone, however, is stuck on T-Mobile's slower Edge data network, so if you rely on cellular data a lot that might frustrated you. That isn't a problem for me because I am on T-Mobile because I don't want a data plan. If I did however, they would be cheaper on T-Mobile. I rely entirely on wi-fi and Navigon (a GPS app that stores the maps on the phone).

On T-Mobile you can get a 2 line family plan with 1000 shared minutes and unlimited text with unlimited data (slowed down to edge speeds after 2 GB) for less than eighty dollars a month. The same plan on AT&T will cost you $145 a month. If you subtract the $398 in subsidies you'd pay AT&T, the total cost a month spread out over two years would be about $37 a month for two phones. So on T-Mobile your actual cost comes out to about $117 a month. Unlike on AT&T you can even make that cheaper if you are willing to get by with just wi-fi. For instance, I am on a $59.99 a month plan that includes 1000 shared minutes, unlimited text, and no data.
post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fake_William_Shatner View Post

Anyone think that it MIGHT be because T-Mobile cannot support the increased bandwidth? I mean, nobody uses their phones like iPhone users.

T-Mobile probably figures they won't capture a lot of market-share and they would have to deal with a doubling of usage.

Their target market is budget-conscious, so perhaps Android phones are good enough.

T-Mobile is begging for the iPhone. The iPhone 4S doesn't support T-Mobile's 1700 high speed frequency. It would have been easy enough for Apple to support, but it made little sense for Apple to do so if T-Mobile wasn't going to be around anymore. Now that T-Mobile is sticking around, I would be amazed if the next version of the iPhone isn't T-Mobile ready. Apple could also do like it did with Verizon, release a pre iPhone 5 phone that also works with T-Mobile. I wouldn't be surprised, however, if Sprint doesn't have some kind of exclusivity deal for 6 months.
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  • T-Mobile CEO says frequency band issue is 'key reason' for lack of iPhone
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