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Apple postpones China retail launch of iPhone 4S after unruly crowd rages in Beijing [u]

post #1 of 62
Thread Starter 
After an unruly crowd disrupted the release of Apple's iPhone 4S at its flagship location in Beijing, Apple has decided to postpone the sale of its best-selling handset at its official retail locations in China, though the device will still be available through its carrier partner and authorized resellers [updated].

Update: Apple has confirmed in a statement to AllThingsD that it will delay sales of the iPhone 4S at retail locations in Beijing and Shanghai.

“The demand for iPhone 4S has been incredible, and our stores in China have already sold out,” an Apple spokesperson told the publication. “Unfortunately we were unable to open our store at Sanlitun due to the large crowd, and to ensure the safety of our customers and employees, iPhone will not available in our retail stores in Beijing and Shanghai for the time being. Customers can still order iPhone through the Apple Online Store, or buy at China Unicom and other authorized resellers.”

Apple retail staff at the Sanlitun Apple Store in Beijing put signs out Friday afternoon with a note saying, "This store will not be selling the iPhone in the recent future."

Apple had previously announced that the iPhone 4S would go on sale at its Sanlitun retail store in Beijing at 7AM local time (6PM Eastern), but altercations between scalpers and line-waiters have allegedly delayed the launch. As of 8AM, the store had yet to open.

The imminent launch of Apple's latest handset in China had attracted thousands of customers outside the company's five stores throughout the country. Security barricades had originally been set up to manage the crowd at the Sanlitun store earlier in the week, but they were taken down sometime on Thursday night or Friday morning.


Remnants of the crowd outside Sanlitun Apple Store in Beijing early on Friday, Jan. 13.


One journalist on location in Beijing claimed that Apple had canceled the launch because fights had broken out during the night, while some crowd members claimed Apple would take orders for the iPhone 4S at the store on Friday without distributing the devices.

Groups of professional line-waiters and scalpers could be seen congregating outside the store early Friday. As the 7AM launch time came and went without Apple opening its doors, a number of them became disgruntled. Shouts of "Open the door!" rang periodically rang throughout the crowd. At one point, a group of unhappy line-waiters left shouting profanities at Apple. Several individuals were forcefully escorted away by security officials, though it was not immediately clear why they were being removed.

Bloomberg reported on Friday that some angry customers pelted the Apple Store with eggs after it was revealed that the device would not go on sale. According to the publication, the Apple Store in the Pudong district of Shanghai opened an hour early and has begun selling the iPhone 4S.


Police officers cordoned off the Sanlitun Apple store in Beijing on Friday.

The 16GB iPhone 4S is selling for 4,988RMB ($790) on Apple China's online store, while the 32GB and 64GB models sell for 5,888RMB and 6,788RMB, respectively. Estimated shipping time is currently two weeks. China Unicom is also offering iPhone 4S for free with a multi-year contract on plans starting at 286RMB ($45).

The well-organized secondary market in Beijing has led to conflicts at the Sanlitun store in the past. Last year, the release of the iPad 2 and white iPhone 4 was marred by an incident that resulted in a broken glass door and several injuries.

In addition to China, Apple is scheduled to launch the iPhone 4S in 21 more countries on Friday.
post #2 of 62
Odd. I'm sure Apple will release an explanation for why they didn't open on time.

"FFFFFF-"

Now, hang on. Did I say anywhere in there that it couldn't possibly have been Apple's fault they didn't open on time? No. Thank you. Not taking their side, not taking the crowd's side. I'm just curious why Apple wouldn't have met their goal.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #3 of 62
Given that the whole scalpers etc game is quite well known I don't understand why Apple didn't do this launch as by reservation only, or perhaps only phones that were activated under a contract, no cash purchases or some other system to limit such games.

Or at least have tons of security there, hand out numbers or such to prevent line jumpers, fights etc.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #4 of 62
Why, why, WHY does Apple not take a more proactive role in prevent this sort of melee? It seems the Chinese market is more prone to scalpers and line-cutters that something really needs to be done to provide a fair and safe environment for folks that wait in line for hours.

This can be easily dismissed as something regular security folks should handle, but Apple should set some kind of standard.
post #5 of 62
Has anyone ever become unruly over the launch of an Android or Windows Phone 7?

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Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

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post #6 of 62
Chinese scalpers suck in New York, I personally witnessed that. And apparently, Chinese scalpers suck in China too.

Scalpers are lowlifes and it's no surprise that altercations break out between the lowlifes and the real Apple customers who are patiently waiting in line. These scumbags cut in line and try to bully their way to the front.

I'd like to see more altercations happening, with the outcome being that the scalpers end up getting the short end of the stick. Some of them belong in hospitals and not on an Apple line.
post #7 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Odd. I'm sure Apple will release an explanation for why they didn't open on time.

"FFFFFF-"

Now, hang on. Did I say anywhere in there that it couldn't possibly have been Apple's fault they didn't open on time? No. Thank you. Not taking their side, not taking the crowd's side. I'm just curious why Apple wouldn't have met their goal.

And you would open your store's doors to an unruly crowd of crazy people?
No I did';t think so
post #8 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Has anyone ever become unruly over the launch of an Android or Windows Phone 7?

With so many Android launches every year, it limits the crowd that might swell for a single device. Windows Phones actually get released? Launch dates for Windows phones haven't gotten the most traffic on the net that I have seen honestly.

As to the crowds, sucks for them that it wasn't open when they said it would be, but shit happens. I'm curious how much delay there was before they did open the doors. Clearly those people never had to wait on Axl Rose tocome onstage for a performance, that kinda thing will get you used to waiting
post #9 of 62
Too bad there's so much trouble for iPhone sales. Getting an iPhone should be a happy occasion. In the U.S. the crowds and lines seem rather tame and civil. i've only been to a couple of Apple store openings and everyone around me seemed to be having a grand old time. I'd always heard that American were the pushy and forceful ones and the Chinese are into some calm Zen space.
post #10 of 62
I can't imagine what would happen here in the States if a certain shoe was released..........
post #11 of 62
Just another confirmation of my previous post on this - 99% of the people waiting there are either professional line-waiters or scalpers....
post #12 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Chinese scalpers suck in New York, I personally witnessed that. And apparently, Chinese scalpers suck in China too.

Scalpers are lowlifes and it's no surprise that altercations break out between the lowlifes and the real Apple customers who are patiently waiting in line. These scumbags cut in line and try to bully their way to the front.

I'd like to see more altercations happening, with the outcome being that the scalpers end up getting the short end of the stick. Some of them belong in hospitals and not on an Apple line.

Lowlifes or not, the new iPhone represents an opportunity for a huge mark-up and profit for scalpers. Whenever demand outstrips supply to this degree, the opportunists will come out of the woodwork.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #13 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Has anyone ever become unruly over the launch of an Android or Windows Phone 7?


Only after they start trying to use it.
post #14 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSquirrel View Post

With so many Android launches every year, it limits the crowd that might swell for a single device.

Of course! That explains it. <smacks own forehead>

post #15 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMcIn View Post

Only after they start trying to use it.

Or when they try to return it.
post #16 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Lowlifes or not, the new iPhone represents an opportunity for a huge mark-up and profit for scalpers. Whenever demand outstrips supply to this degree, the opportunists will come out of the woodwork.

and all the best to the scalpers, if money can be made, go for it. You never jump at any occasion to make some coin on the side?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

Too bad there's so much trouble for iPhone sales. Getting an iPhone should be a happy occasion. In the U.S. the crowds and lines seem rather tame and civil. i've only been to a couple of Apple store openings and everyone around me seemed to be having a grand old time. I'd always heard that American were the pushy and forceful ones and the Chinese are into some calm Zen space.

If you only lived here. If I dont push into lines/trains/entrances/buses here, I'll never get anywhere and just be walked on. Its everyman for himself. only civilized places are some western restaurants, my office building and my apartment.
post #17 of 62
I loved living in Korea very dearly, but china was especially unpleasant. I never want to go back there again.

Crudeness and rudeness and an uncouth disposition is a well-practiced art there. So much for 5,000 years of culture.
post #18 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

Too bad there's so much trouble for iPhone sales. Getting an iPhone should be a happy occasion. In the U.S. the crowds and lines seem rather tame and civil. i've only been to a couple of Apple store openings and everyone around me seemed to be having a grand old time. I'd always heard that American were the pushy and forceful ones and the Chinese are into some calm Zen space.

You have lived a sheltered life.

It should be noticeable on your very first bus/taxi/car ride in Southeast Asia. Those lines painted on the road? They're just a laughable suggestion at where you should place your vehicle, but nobody follows them.

Queuing up/standing in an orderly line is a tradition that is mostly restricted to English-speaking countries. Want to get into a bus in Italy? Just push forward when the doors open.
post #19 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

Too bad there's so much trouble for iPhone sales. Getting an iPhone should be a happy occasion. In the U.S. the crowds and lines seem rather tame and civil. i've only been to a couple of Apple store openings and everyone around me seemed to be having a grand old time. I'd always heard that American were the pushy and forceful ones and the Chinese are into some calm Zen space.

Uh, Chinese are calm and Zen. That's a laugh. The Chinese are some of the rudest, pushiest, dirtiest people I have ever come across! Come spend a week out here with me in San Francisco, and you'll have a change of thought!
post #20 of 62
I would think that this does not bode well for chinese culture in the long run.
post #21 of 62
Oddly, the other store in Beijing opened up as normal and was selling phones. it would be as if Apple had closed the 5th Avenue store but kept the Upper West Side open. Anyway, I'm guessing that it has something to do with crowd control. Apple is clearly learning how to do retail business in China, and hopefully they'll be better planned when the iPad 3 and iPhone 5 are released. Apple doesn't need the kind of bad publicity this is sure to get.
post #22 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

You have lived a sheltered life.

It should be noticeable on your very first bus/taxi/car ride in Southeast Asia. Those lines painted on the road? They're just a laughable suggestion at where you should place your vehicle, but nobody follows them.

Queuing up/standing in an orderly line is a tradition that is mostly restricted to English-speaking countries. Want to get into a bus in Italy? Just push forward when the doors open.

Bravo for the stereotype on italians. Have you actually been there?

That must explain why all those american tourists fail to understand the concept of letting people out of the train first, as I often see it.
post #23 of 62
I lived in Italy for about six months in Tuscany, toured other regions for about six months. I am fluent in the language, so if I needed to call someone out, my ability to speak it never stopped me.

I used the Italians as an example, not to single them out as a stereotype.

Italians don't let other Italians off the train first. It's a free-for-all. As to your observation about American tourists failing to let other people out of the train first, it really comes down to those newbies who really haven't encountered the situation. The Americans who have little overseas experience will patiently stand in line and get annoyed because the locals just barge through.

The Italians are nowhere near the worst offenders. They realize that everyone will get aboard. The question is whether or not you will actually get a seat or if you will end up standing the entire Roma-Florence train ride. I usually had a reserved seat and if I ever got the brush off from someone in my reserved spot, it's easy to call over the conductor. "Signore, buon giorno. Ecco il mio biglietto e la prenotazione. Dov'e questa sedia?" A minute later, I would comfortably seated.

Even if I were aggressive enough to barge through and get an unreserved seat in such a throng, I'd probably quickly give up my spot to some little old lady.

Just chill out.
post #24 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

I lived in Italy for about six months in Tuscany, toured other regions for about six months. I am fluent in the language, so if I needed to call someone out, my ability to speak it never stopped me.

I used the Italians as an example, not to single them out as a stereotype.

Italians don't let other Italians off the train first. It's a free-for-all. As to your observation about American tourists failing to let other people out of the train first, it really comes down to those newbies who really haven't encountered the situation. The Americans who have little overseas experience will patiently stand in line and get annoyed because the locals just barge through.

The Italians are nowhere near the worst offenders. They realize that everyone will get aboard. The question is whether or not you will actually get a seat or if you will end up standing the entire Roma-Florence train ride. I usually had a reserved seat and if I ever got the brush off from someone in my reserved spot, it's easy to call over the conductor. "Signore, buon giorno. Ecco la mia prenotazione. Dov'e questa sedia?" A minute later, I would comfortably seated.

Even if I were aggressive enough to barge through and get an unreserved seat in such a throng, I'd probably quickly give up my spot to some little old lady.

Just chill out.

Well, I'm sorry you had that negative experience, in my experience I never witnessed that EDIT not any more than any other country anyway. And if someone is on my seat, I just tell them to move.
post #25 of 62
Beijing SWAT team is now involved.

I'm hearing the launch has been cancelled for this particular store.
My car keeps crashing whenever I do 150mph. It's a design flaw. People tell me to slow down and drive normally but I should be able to use it as I wish.
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My car keeps crashing whenever I do 150mph. It's a design flaw. People tell me to slow down and drive normally but I should be able to use it as I wish.
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post #26 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Chinese scalpers suck in New York, I personally witnessed that. And apparently, Chinese scalpers suck in China too.

Scalpers are lowlifes and it's no surprise that altercations break out between the lowlifes and the real Apple customers who are patiently waiting in line. These scumbags cut in line and try to bully their way to the front.

I'd like to see more altercations happening, with the outcome being that the scalpers end up getting the short end of the stick. Some of them belong in hospitals and not on an Apple line.

I remember here in Palo Alto, when I was buying my iPad 2 on launch day, a clean-cut white kid who's family is probably part of the 1% was walking around trying to sell a couple iPads to people waiting in line for $150 over MSRP, and he was even overtly rude about it, like we somehow owed it to him to buy it.

I haven't the SLIGHTEST doubt in my mind that if I had related this story to you outside of this context you would have called him a "young entrepreneur" or an equally fragile justification. But do you feel like this kid should be put in the hospital? I think he even had blue eyes for christ's sake, what a tragedy THAT would be!

This comment is racist, as are a few of your others, and I am surprised that there isn't any moderation, apparently, on this forum.

(For the record, I am an upper middle class white man.)
post #27 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickf View Post

I loved living in Korea very dearly, but china was especially unpleasant. I never want to go back there again.

Crudeness and rudeness and an uncouth disposition is a well-practiced art there. So much for 5,000 years of culture.

By US standards, my experience was the Chinese were incredibly rude and uncivil, at least in Beijing. While one could chalk it up to the aggressiveness and rudeness inherent in large city denizens, if I contrast it with the behavior of folks in Tokyo, Osaka, Seoul, or Singapore it couldn't be more night and day.

While visiting China was an experience of unbelievable cultural opportunity and enrichment, I actually came away from my time there with a profoundly negative view of the Chinese of Beijing. I specify, because when I lived in Taipei I did not have the same experience, and I've been told that Chinese from other cities view Beijingers as particularly uncouth, but I don't have any data points to validate that. So, in my experience anyway, Beijingers are arguably the rudest people I've encountered in the 33 countries I've visited.
post #28 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by mortarman View Post

By US standards, my experience was the Chinese were incredibly rude and uncivil, at least in Beijing. While one could chalk it up to the aggressiveness and rudeness inherent in large city denizens, if I contrast it with the behavior of folks in Tokyo, Osaka, Seoul, or Singapore it couldn't be more night and day.

While visiting China was an experience of unbelievable cultural opportunity and enrichment, I actually came away from my time there with a profoundly negative view of the Chinese of Beijing. I specify, because when I lived in Taipei I did not have the same experience, and I've been told that Chinese from other cities view Beijingers as particularly uncouth, but I don't have any data points to validate that. So, in my experience anyway, Beijingers are arguably the rudest people I've encountered in the 33 countries I've visited.

It's not the people, it's the institution. Beijing is the capital of China, and it's basically a place in which rule of law means nothing, and only the strong (in terms of political influence) rule. That's why lot's of people there have no manner - because there's no incentive to have manner. If you're the strong one, you get whatever you want, no need to be nice. If you're the weak one, you have to 'look tough' by being rude and aggressive because that's the only thing left to defend yourself from the rulers.
post #29 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

AppleInsider has reached out to Apple for comment on the status of the iPhone 4S launch in China, but has yet to hear back from the company.

Did this make anyone else laugh?
AI sounds so sensitive and caring in their approach to Apple! One corporate entity reaching out to another corporate entity.
post #30 of 62
Yes, China is a crazy rude place when you are in a crowd. This is just a statement of fact not racism. One on one and in tamer situations though, I quite enjoy most Chinese folks. In some ways China seems to have an energy that reminds me of America from a generation or two ago, especially in the rural areas.

The rudeness of crowds is firmly embedded in China both from long standing cultural precedent (as demonstrated by rude crowds in Taiwan and other parts of Asia) and also more recently from the influence of totalitarian ideas (25 years ago crowds in mainland China were even worse.)
It has improved greatly over the years, but it will take a long time for old norms of behavior to change. The behavior of most of China now is more like that of the Hong Kongers of 20 years ago, which is a huge positive change in such a short time. I think most Chinese aspire to create a more civil society for themselves, as do most people in the world.
post #31 of 62
for christ's sake, enlighten me how an altercation in waiting to buy an iPhone will change a culture?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 801 View Post

I would think that this does not bode well for chinese culture in the long run.
post #32 of 62
every once a month, i went to a local book fair to buy some used books for cheap. for sure those printed objects are not favors to many ppl anymore, but their residual values lie on reselling them high by buying it cheap first. most young are late while early birds are most seniors. specially in the cold winter, it is a pity to see those seniors standing outside for the ticket to get in first. well, everything is pretty civil until the book fair door is open. you wanna me to continue to describe what is going to happen in that tiny small room?

you can come to see as i am in south bay. it is in one of the best places in bay area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by alolkoy View Post

Uh, Chinese are calm and Zen. That's a laugh. The Chinese are some of the rudest, pushiest, dirtiest people I have ever come across! Come spend a week out here with me in San Francisco, and you'll have a change of thought!
post #33 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

You have lived a sheltered life.

It should be noticeable on your very first bus/taxi/car ride in Southeast Asia. Those lines painted on the road? They're just a laughable suggestion at where you should place your vehicle, but nobody follows them.

Queuing up/standing in an orderly line is a tradition that is mostly restricted to English-speaking countries. Want to get into a bus in Italy? Just push forward when the doors open.

I can't speak for China, as I have never visited it, but your summary of traffic rules and civic sense perfectly describe India.
post #34 of 62
holy shit, what are you? you think you are michael j. fox to time travel? were you in china 25 years ago? how the hell do you know things at that time? are you smoking joint? if you were in china 25 years ago, unless you are one of those pathetic low life chinese as you mentioned, you would not have a chance to deal those hassles as being a local chinese.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

Yes, China is a crazy rude place when you are in a crowd. This is just a statement of fact not racism. One on one and in tamer situations though, I quite enjoy most Chinese folks. In some ways China seems to have an energy that reminds me of America from a generation or two ago, especially in the rural areas.

The rudeness of crowds is firmly embedded in China both from long standing cultural precedent (as demonstrated by rude crowds in Taiwan and other parts of Asia) and also more recently from the influence of totalitarian ideas (25 years ago crowds in mainland China were even worse.)
It has improved greatly over the years, but it will take a long time for old norms of behavior to change. The behavior of most of China now is more like that of the Hong Kongers of 20 years ago, which is a huge positive change in such a short time. I think most Chinese aspire to create a more civil society for themselves, as do most people in the world.
post #35 of 62
c'mon, man, in other places maybe people treat you as rare species, but in beijing, you were just treated like a normal human being. you should not feel very bad about it, should you?


Quote:
Originally Posted by mortarman View Post

By US standards, my experience was the Chinese were incredibly rude and uncivil, at least in Beijing. While one could chalk it up to the aggressiveness and rudeness inherent in large city denizens, if I contrast it with the behavior of folks in Tokyo, Osaka, Seoul, or Singapore it couldn't be more night and day.

While visiting China was an experience of unbelievable cultural opportunity and enrichment, I actually came away from my time there with a profoundly negative view of the Chinese of Beijing. I specify, because when I lived in Taipei I did not have the same experience, and I've been told that Chinese from other cities view Beijingers as particularly uncouth, but I don't have any data points to validate that. So, in my experience anyway, Beijingers are arguably the rudest people I've encountered in the 33 countries I've visited.
post #36 of 62
I feel sorry for normal customers who have to miss out, because of the scalpers.

Will it become Apple's pattern in China, to launch online first for a few months, and only then launch physically?
post #37 of 62
I am aware of the existence of cultural differences between East and West, but never knew they were so vast as to include the concept of time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

<...>
Apple retail staff at the Sanlitun Apple Store in Beijing put signs out Friday afternoon with a note saying, "This store will not be selling the iPhone in the recent future."
<...>

Isn't the recent future the same as the present?
post #38 of 62
This is not going to be politically correct yet I would say it is not racist... but Ethnic Chinese simply have issues when it comes to civility and ethics. I'm not saying everyone, but around the world, we (I'm half ethnic Chinese) are now brought up in ways that sometimes do not put the right value on etiquette and so on. Mainland China itself is reputed to be a real basket case. My childhood friend who is 100% ethnic Chinese but of Malaysian nationality simply doesn't want to go back there after working in Shanghai for over 5 years. Again, not everyone, but as someone with Chinese heritage I am concerned of how we are perceived in Western countries, let alone Asia itself.
post #39 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

I am aware of the existence of cultural differences between East and West, but never knew they were so vast as to include the concept of time.

Isn't the recent future the same as the present?

What they mean to say is the "We will not be selling iPhone 4S in the near future".

Yes, a translation hiccup. Very common in Asia. Not a concept-of-time issue as such.
post #40 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

Too bad there's so much trouble for iPhone sales. Getting an iPhone should be a happy occasion. In the U.S. the crowds and lines seem rather tame and civil. i've only been to a couple of Apple store openings and everyone around me seemed to be having a grand old time. I'd always heard that American were the pushy and forceful ones and the Chinese are into some calm Zen space.

Easiest thing I can say is don't believe the Kung Fu movies or panda-related animation. There is virtually nothing in modern ethnic Chinese life that is related to ancient wisdom except slavishly following certain traditions to "save face". Again I am truly dissapointed so far in what I have seen of ethnic Chinese in many cities I've been to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

You have lived a sheltered life.

It should be noticeable on your very first bus/taxi/car ride in Southeast Asia. Those lines painted on the road? They're just a laughable suggestion at where you should place your vehicle, but nobody follows them.

Queuing up/standing in an orderly line is a tradition that is mostly restricted to English-speaking countries. Want to get into a bus in Italy? Just push forward when the doors open.

Malaysia is not as bad as Vietnam but of late Kuala Lumpur is a horror story. Forget the road, motorbikes just go on the pavement if they like. And yes, road signs and red lights at night are indeed just laughable suggestions. Enforcement? Virtually non-existent, if a cop pulls you over you just slip a few fiddy notes between his summons book. Parking fines by city councils are apparently ignored because they somehow can't be enforced or something like that which I never figured out. Only police fines (in the rare cases where bribery does not happen because of the cop or the driver or because of speed cameras etc) are payable.

Despite being as safe as possible in Malaysia the past five years, returning to Australia, I'm noticing a lot of bad habits I've accumulated which is out of character with the locals (except for hoons and bogans... even then they are not too horrible during the day).

Quote:
Originally Posted by alolkoy View Post

Uh, Chinese are calm and Zen. That's a laugh. The Chinese are some of the rudest, pushiest, dirtiest people I have ever come across! Come spend a week out here with me in San Francisco, and you'll have a change of thought!

Yeah, the Chinese in San Francisco don't represent the best of us except for the younger generation that was either born in the US or immigrated when young.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeanSolecki View Post

I remember here in Palo Alto, when I was buying my iPad 2 on launch day, a clean-cut white kid who's family is probably part of the 1% was walking around trying to sell a couple iPads to people waiting in line for $150 over MSRP, and he was even overtly rude about it, like we somehow owed it to him to buy it.

I haven't the SLIGHTEST doubt in my mind that if I had related this story to you outside of this context you would have called him a "young entrepreneur" or an equally fragile justification. But do you feel like this kid should be put in the hospital? I think he even had blue eyes for christ's sake, what a tragedy THAT would be!

This comment is racist, as are a few of your others, and I am surprised that there isn't any moderation, apparently, on this forum.

(For the record, I am an upper middle class white man.)

As I proposed earlier there's nothing here that is racist, merely politically incorrect. The post you are referring to said that scalpers are lowlifes and there were a lot of Chinese scalpers in New York during the launch (there's clear evidence of this). He did not say that Chinese are lowlifes.

I know I smack of "if you're black you can use the N word" but like I said, having half Chinese ancestry, there's nothing here that surprised me. It's just that now mainland China is the focus of so much interest, that we see the worst of the culture. Chinese immigrants to all other parts of the world have adapted, improved and played positive roles in various countries over the past few centuries, but whatever is going on in mainland China (I've never been, but I've heard a lot from Malaysian Chinese and others)... is just bizarre but also disturbing.

Probably the last nail in the coffin for communism by the way, just doesn't seem to be right for humankind.
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