or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Reacting to Apple at CES 2012, part two: Samsung's Galaxy Note
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Reacting to Apple at CES 2012, part two: Samsung's Galaxy Note

post #1 of 103
Thread Starter 
As noted in part one, the success of Apple's MacBook Air has driven Intel to inspire its Ultrabooks initiative. Here's a look at how the rest of the industry has chased Apple at this year's CES, starting with Samsung and its fiercely independent new role as an Android licensee.

Reacting to Apple at CES 2012, part one: Intel's Ultrabooks
Reacting to Apple at CES 2012, part two: Samsung's Galaxy Note
Reacting to Apple at CES 2012, part three: Sony, Motorola, RIM, Nokia

Samsung's Galaxy Note takes on the iPad, with a phone

Samsung had a huge booth with lots on display, from a refrigerator running apps to ultra thin, big screen SuperOLED HDTVs. The star of Samsung's exhibit, however, was the Galaxy Note. It even got a huge banner blanketing the sprawling convention's facade, and inside, the most visible signage in Samsung's booth.

While Samsung has been chastised for "slavishly copying" Apple in its smartphone and tablet designs, the Galaxy Note is a new response to the iPad from Samsung, a mini-tablet that incorporates the stylus features that Apple's Steve Jobs mocked five years ago as the wrong way to go about working with mobile devices.



Nobody can say Samsung is aping Apple with its stylus, and the pen-driven aspects of the Galaxy Note are central to its value proposition. Samsung even developed its own pen API and apps to make the stylus more than just a gimmick thrown in the box, and was promoting the device by hiring caricature artists to draw attendees using the device's stylus.



Originally introduced in October, the Galaxy Note is a very large 5.3 inch screen smartphone that incorporates a stylus to perform Tablet PC-like features. Beyond the stylus, it also diverges from Apple's strategy of clearly differentiating its iPhone and iPad as separate products optimized to perform different roles; the Galaxy Note acts as a hybrid placeholder in Samsung's array of Galaxy-branded products that range from conventional smartphones to large screen smartphones to the Note to its small and large Galaxy Tab slates with screen sizes ranging from 7 to 7.7 to 8.9 to 10.1 inches.

Will Galaxy Note be the Palm Pilot to Apple's iOS Newton?

At first glance, the Galaxy Note looks like a smaller, simpler iPad, evoking memories of how Palm's 1997-era cheap, simple $300 Pilot rapidly took over the PDA market that Apple had originally coined with its $700 Newton MessagePad three years earlier. The difference today, however, is that the Galaxy Note isn't cheap.

While the Pilot was less than half the price of a MessagePad, Samsung's 16GB Galaxy Note is $760-$900 on Amazon, considerably more than the 16GB 3G iPad 2 (which Amazon sells for $550-$630). In large part, that's because the Note incorporates all the features of a high end LTE smartphone, including an 8 megapixel camera and a "near Retina" 285ppi Super AMOLED 1280x800 display.

These features all add to the Note's price but also enable it to double as a gigantic smartphone for a "no compromises" experience like that promised by Microsoft's "optimized for everything" Windows 8 with Metro.

The Galaxy Note also packs on the full horsepower of a dual core 1.4 GHz Cortex A9 Exynos or 1.5 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon (there are multiple hardware versions of the Note running SoCs with different graphics cores) and a full gigabyte of RAM, features that eat up battery life but are essential to running Android fast enough to feel responsive.

In large part, that hardware is necessary because the Note runs Android 2.3 Gingerbread from 2010, which lacks the hardware accelerated graphics of Google's newer 2011 Android 3.0 Honeycomb and its successor from last month, Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Even with all its horsepower, the Galaxy Note's user interface still feels a bit sluggish even compared to a 2009 iPhone 3GS, despite being powered by chips with a faster clock speed than brand new iPhone 4S.

On page 2 of 3: Galaxy vs Android

Galaxy vs Android

The Note is more than just Samsung proving that it can introduce a product that isn't a direct clone of an Apple product. It's also a declaration of independence from the freedom and openness of Google's Android.

Google has to be concerned when it sees third parties at CES referring to "Galaxy & Android devices," because Samsung has now gained a marketing name poised to usurp the crown of Google's mobile operating system, with Google's help.



Samsung was one of the first Android licensees to blatantly ignore Google's request not to use Android 2.x to build tablets back in late 2010, when it introduced the original 7 inch Galaxy Tab. Yet, after working with Google for over a year on delivering Android 3.0 Honeycomb versions of its Galaxy Tab devices throughout 2011, Samsung is back to releasing an Android 2.3-based tablet device for 2012.

The only explanation for this is Samsung's reported interest in developing its own software and platform value, an initiative that was kicked into high gear after Google announced plans to buy Motorola.

Last August, Samsung's chairman reportedly "urged his company`s executives to strengthen Samsung`s smartphone operating system Bada in responding to Google's takeover of Motorola Mobility" and "focus on differentiating the quality of Samsungs smartphones."

While Android licensees all lined up to voice support for their singular party platform and the "Great Successor" of Android 3.0/4.0, the acquisition of Motorola by Google is a direct threat to what are now second tier licensees, simply because they are now in line behind Motorola, a new first party to Google's Android platform.

While Samsung, Google's most visible and successful licensee, is distancing itself from Google in an effort to control its own destiny, Google is working to enforce the use of its own "Holo" user interface for Android 4.0 for any devices that connect to its Android Market. It's also working to promote its "Android Upgrade Alliance" to enhance homogeny and gain control of the fractionalization tearing apart the Android platform.

Solo not Holo

Samsung's "go it alone" opposition strategy has included creating its own TouchWiz user interface for its Android phones, something that Samsung used as an excuse not to roll out Android 4.0 to customers of its relatively new Galaxy S, a direct attack on Google's Android Upgrade Alliance, which was supposed to commit licenses to roll out upgrades for their Android devices for at least 18 months.



Samsung's move was particularly embarrassing for Google because the Galaxy S is virtually identical to the Nexus S, a cobranded Google model. Galaxy S was first released in July 2010, making it about the same age as iPhone 4, and barely 18 months old when Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich rolled out on the Samsung/Google Galaxy Nexus last month. (Correction was made to Galaxy/Nexus S branding details as originally published a few hours ago.)

With the Galaxy Note, Samsung has not only continued using Android 2.3 and TouchWiz, but has also added its own new stylus features, pen-based apps and a stylus API for third party developers. Google has developed its own stylus support in parallel in Android 4.0, but the two implementations aren't compatible; they were both developed in isolation.

So while Google is pushing homogeny among tablets and smartphones with Android 4.0, its top smartphone licensee Samsung has adopted the same strategy of Android's top selling tablet maker, Amazon: take an old version of the platform, fork it, and drive off in an original direction at odds with Google's strategic plan.

Samsung has also followed Amazon in plotting to replace Google entirely by starting to develop its own mobile advertising intuitive, AdHub. If Google was concerned about Apple's iAd taking back a significant chunk of iOS mobile ad revenue, it must also be concerned that the two most prolific Android licensees are both attempting to take the mobile revenue currently supporting Android for themselves.

Android vs Tizen

On top of that, Samsung has also followed up on expanding two initiatives that directly compete for oxygen with Android: Samsung's own Bada platform, and the company's Tizen partnership with Intel, which is essentially the remains of Intel's Meego partnership with Nokia without Nokia (which has since abandoned Meego Linux to focus on Microsoft's Windows Phone platform).

If those two efforts weren't enough evidence that Samsung wants independence from Android, the company also just announced plans at CES to combine Bada with Tizen, creating a new Linux mobile platform that can run existing Bada apps and porting Samsung's Bada SDK to Tizen.

Samsung is also a Windows Phone licensee, but the company's own Bada platform now has greater market share among mobile phones than Microsoft has with WP7 across all of its licensees, making Bada/Tizen a credible candidate for the third place smartphone platform. Of course, removing Samsung's support from Android would also have a tremendous impact on the viability of Android to remain among the top two.

That should leave Google terrified of Samsung, which is essentially doing to Google what Google did to its original smartphone partner Apple. The primary difference is that Apple continued to make lots of money even as Google delivered Android, while Google isn't making nearly as much revenue from Android, and will likely collapse if Samsung, Amazon, Barnes & Noble and others continue to take its software and ignore Google's ad platform.

On page 3 of 3: More Samsung at CES

More Samsung at CES

Samsung's other mobile innovations at CES included the "Smart Station," billed as a way to "let your keyboard and mouse control your Smart Phone."

Samsung's platform savvy was also on display in a series of laptops running everything from conventional Windows to the pre-iPad Slate PC to Google's Chromebook specification.



The company even still had a 2007-era Surface PC on display, in a cordoned-off strip of museum also presenting a refrigerator, microwave and washing machine fitted with touch screens and running apps.



One product that beat Samsung in adding a touchscreen to it was the Almond-branded WiFi router. Although, presumably, if you have a WiFi router you also have some sort of device with a display you can configure it with, and don't need to dedicate all that hardware to a device that's intended to sit largely ignored on a shelf.



More impressive were Samsung's HTDVs, from the super slim Series 8 models to the wafer-thin technology demo of SuperOLED panels driven by a cabinet of gear below them (below, and juxtaposed alongside the Slate PC above).






Part three provides an overview of Apple's impact on other CES exhibitors, including Motorola, Nokia, RIM and Sony.

Reacting to Apple at CES 2012, part one: Intel's Ultrabooks
Reacting to Apple at CES 2012, part two: Samsung's Galaxy Note
Reacting to Apple at CES 2012, part three: Sony, Motorola, RIM, Nokia
post #2 of 103
"the finger, best pointing device" .... that's it ...
post #3 of 103
Quote:
Nobody can say Samsung is aping Apple with its stylus,

Then you must not know Apple fans.

I've already heard some people say other wise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by umrk_lab View Post

"the finger, best pointing device" .... that's it ...

Tell that to an artist or people with actual jobs.

Ever try scribbling down notes with your fingers?

Drawing detailed diagrams with your fingers?

Pie chart and bar charts with your fingers?

Yes, that is what people in the work place do.

No, really.



Just give credit where its due (as much as people like your kind hate to do).

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

Reply

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

Reply
post #4 of 103
How is nobody realizing the complete and blatant error on the part of the author? I love Apple as much as the next, but don't make up stuff to try to make a point. Android 4.0 was not held from the Nexus S because of TouchWiz, it was held from their Galaxy S II models. I still think that's rediculous and horrible service to their paying customers, but the Nexus S, I believe, already got 4.0.
post #5 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The Note is more than just Samsung proving that it can introduce a product that isn't a direct clone of an Apple product. It's also a declaration of independence from the freedom and openness of Google's Android.

I didn't realise this was already happening, just speculation that could happen.

Despite Samsung being put up against Apple, Apple has the least to worry about from Samsung. Samsung is hurting Google, is hurting MS, is hurting all other vendors using Android or Windows. They have blatantly stolen Apple designs but they're losing profit the way the others are and Apple will continue to maintain their control of the PMP, handset, tablet and PC markets. The only real option for Samsung is getting Bada to be as competent as Apple with quality HW to match, but that seems like a longterm plan for Samsung.


Quote:
Originally Posted by umrk_lab View Post

"the finger, best pointing device" .... that's it ...

I can't parse that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Then you must not know Apple fans.

I've already heard some people say other wise.

No you haven't. Aping means imitating and Apple has no stylus in production.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #6 of 103
+1 for an interesting discussion on Samsung-Google relations.
-1 for insinuating that Apple has anything to do with that.
post #7 of 103
Well, I've been outraged by Samsung's "operation" for a while. However, if they decide to do something on their on for a change, that might end up well. However, taunting all the giants to see how far they can go is bad.

Apple's touch screen devices do have the hardware capability to be used with styluses. There are even some software projects that allow you to do so. All unsupported and doing so would void warranty, bla bla, but the technology is there.

If Samsung comes up with a game changer device, that will be terrific. Not only it will force some players to get back to the top of their game, as it may also make Apple bring some innovations that we all know could be good, but that the vast majority doesn't care because it would only help a small minority of people.

I can't deny it, using my finger to draw somethings on an iPad is... well... horrible. There must be a pen like something to work with. Sausage pen? Seriously? No thanks...
post #8 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by igorleandro View Post

I can't deny it, using my finger to draw somethings on an iPad is... well... horrible. There must be a pen like something to work with. Sausage pen? Seriously? No thanks...

There are dozens of companies that make capacitance styli, but It's not anything Apple did it's what they do to make it work with your finger. You can use them on your Mac's trackpad, too. Anywhere a system responds to capacitance touch.

One thing this Galaxy Note pen has that I haven't seen on 3rd-party solutions are buttons on the stylus that will work with the Note's system. I'm not sure how, but that plus a more Wacom-esque experience that allows for very slow and detailed drawing is something I haven't seen on Apple's devices. Previously Apple's touchscreen was clearly the best when matched against other smartphones but I wonder if Samsung's inclusion of the stylus forced them to use a more refined digitizer.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #9 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

There are dozens of companies that make capacitance styli, but It's not anything Apple did it's what they do to make it work with your finger. You can use them on your Mac's trackpad, too. Anywhere a system responds to capacitance touch.

One thing this Galaxy Note pen has that I haven't seen on 3rd-party solutions are buttons on the stylus that will work with the Note's system. I'm not sure how, but that plus a more Wacom-esque experience that allows for very slow and detailed drawing is something I haven't seen on Apple's devices. Previously Apple's touchscreen was clearly the best when matched against other smartphones but I wonder if Samsung's inclusion of the stylus forced them to use a more refined digitizer.

Its not "Wacom-esque" it IS a Wacom digitzer with 256 level of sensitivity (pressures).

Example video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WSpbD..._order&list=UL

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

Reply

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

Reply
post #10 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Its not "Wacom-esque" it IS a Wacom digitzer with 256 level of sensitivity (pressures).

Example video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WSpbD..._order&list=UL

1) So who said that Samsung is imitating Apple with this stylus and Wacom digitizer?

2) this is a nice addition, one that would be nice for larger tablets, but we're still dealign with a 5" device which I don't think is the best size for the unique buyers that need a tablet they can draw on.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #11 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Then you must not know Apple fans.

I've already heard some people say other wise.



Tell that to an artist or people with actual jobs.

Ever try scribbling down notes with your fingers?

Drawing detailed diagrams with your fingers?

Pie chart and bar charts with your fingers?

Yes, that is what people in the work place do.

No, really.



Just give credit where its due (as much as people like your kind hate to do).


Notice how Galbi said the FINGER was the best POINTING device. Not drawing or scribbling or coffee making device. The best POINTING. POINTING. POINTING.

seriously...
post #12 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Its not "Wacom-esque" it IS a Wacom digitzer with 256 level of sensitivity (pressures).

Example video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WSpbD..._order&list=UL

They sure blew it with this one... out of the water!

I hope this isn't patented. Would be nice to see other companies offering alternative implementations.
post #13 of 103
A big a** 5 inch hd screen and 1.5 ghz chip= 15 minutes of usage.
BS aside I was unimpressed when I went to Youtube and saw a demo of the Galaxy Note.
post #14 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

There are dozens of companies that make capacitance styli, but It's not anything Apple did it's what they do to make it work with your finger. You can use them on your Mac's trackpad, too. Anywhere a system responds to capacitance touch.

One thing this Galaxy Note pen has that I haven't seen on 3rd-party solutions are buttons on the stylus that will work with the Note's system. I'm not sure how, but that plus a more Wacom-esque experience that allows for very slow and detailed drawing is something I haven't seen on Apple's devices. Previously Apple's touchscreen was clearly the best when matched against other smartphones but I wonder if Samsung's inclusion of the stylus forced them to use a more refined digitizer.

I wonder if Apple will even bother with highly-accurate stylus input. I'm sure they could figure it out.... but that's still a very specialized task. Apple seems to focus on the more mainstream consumer.

The reason all those old smartphones used a stylus is because the screens were terrible and the interfaces were terrible... not because people were drawing all over their Palm Pilots and Windows Mobile phones.

There are quite a few Windows tablets that offer stylus input, drawing, etc... but they are a niche. Anytime someone mentions OneNote I have to ask... "is that a very popular program compared to general office programs?"

It's not. Drawing on a device is nice... but it's far from mainstream. And for every one person using a Wacom for drawing... there are thousands of people who have no use for such a thing.

I feel that the Galaxy Note will be the one and only stylus phone for quite some time. It might gain a small following... but will not be a star seller.

I don't think Apple has a stylus on their radar.
post #15 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

They sure blew it with this one... out of the water!

I hope this isn't patented. Would be nice to see other companies offering alternative implementations.


Dito

WOW that video turned my opinion of the note around. I would not mind having one after seeing that.
post #16 of 103
Is it just me or is a refrigerator that runs apps one of the stupidest ideas that this industry has ever come up with?
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #17 of 103
What modern TV's are really lacking in is great sound quality. My Kuro, the one with the chin speaker has the best sound ever!!!
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #18 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

I wonder if Apple will even bother with highly-accurate stylus input. I'm sure they could figure it out.... but that's still a very specialized task. Apple seems to focus on the more mainstream consumer.

The reason all those old smartphones used a stylus is because the screens were terrible and the interfaces were terrible... not because people were drawing all over their Palm Pilots and Windows Mobile phones.

There are quite a few Windows tablets that offer stylus input, drawing, etc... but they are a niche. Anytime someone mentions OneNote I have to ask... "is that a very popular program compared to general office programs?"

It's not. Drawing on a device is nice... but it's far from mainstream. And for every one person using a Wacom for drawing... there are thousands of people who have no use for such a thing.

I feel that the Galaxy Note will be the one and only stylus phone for quite some time. It might gain a small following... but will not be a star seller.

I don't think Apple has a stylus on their radar.

I don't see Apple getting into adding a stylus that fits in the device either, but I can see them beefing up the iPad's HW and adding APIs, then letting 3rd-parties sell styli.

It's easily argued that the iPad is the first commercially tablet because it doesn't require a stylus to operate because of a poorly designed UI. There are certainly uses that a pen can do better than a finger tapping or dragging on a screen but general usage isn't one of them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Is it just me or is a refrigerator that runs apps one of the stupidest ideas that this industry has ever come up with?

I think the washer/dryer with an iPod docking station still trumps it.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #19 of 103
I love seeing Samsung backstab Google.

Free and open source software means you can take it and create your own version, independent of the mothership, and cut out the mothership's profits.

Ha ha ha.

I would love to see Samsung completely replace Google's advertisements with its own. This would cut out a large chunk of Google's income.

I would love to see Samsung create its own app market should Google block its customers from the Android market. Then it would also get money that would have gone to Google.

Amazon has lead the way to creating one's own Android ecosystem independent of Google and gaining all the income for oneself.

Samsung, being the evil copyist, saw this move and now wants to copy it.

Gnusmas = Devil in Korea.
post #20 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Is it just me or is a refrigerator that runs apps one of the stupidest ideas that this industry has ever come up with?

This is an idea just a little ahead of its time. As RFID tags get cheaper and cheaper, a "smart refrigerator" could keep track of what is or is not in your refrigerator and pre-order groceries for you. Connect that to your grocery stores supply chain and big efficiencies could be made, driving down prices.

I agree that as it stands, I don't get it, but a refrigerator with intelligence could be a powerful idea.
post #21 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jameskatt2 View Post

I love seeing ... backstab ...

Free and open source ... you can take it ... and cut out ...

Ha ha ha.

I would love to see ... cut out a large chunk of ... income.

I would love to see ... block ... also get money ...

... and gaining all the income for oneself.

...

A whole lotta love.
post #22 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

Android 4.0 was not held from the Nexus S because of TouchWiz, it was held from their Galaxy S II models. I still think that's rediculous and horrible service to their paying customers, but the Nexus S, I believe, already got 4.0.

It wasn´t held from Galaxy S II.
Samsung announced all the Galaxy line, except the Galaxy S and the original Tab 7" will get Android 4.0, Galaxy S and Tab 7" will get a Value Pack with Android 4.0 features, but it won´t be Android 4.0.
post #23 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperTomcat View Post

It wasn´t held from Galaxy S II.
Samsung announced all the Galaxy line, except the Galaxy S and the original Tab 7" will get Android 4.0, Galaxy S and Tab 7" will get a Value Pack with Android 4.0 features, but it won´t be Android 4.0.

I understand why Samsung devices with TouchWiz and 512MB RAM aren't getting the update, but why not the Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7* which has 1GB RAM?


* For those that don't know Samsung's first 7" model was simply called Galxy Tab which came with 512MB RAM.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #24 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Is it just me or is a refrigerator that runs apps one of the stupidest ideas that this industry has ever come up with?

You don´t have idea of appliance line products/customers...
post #25 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I understand why Samsung devices with TouchWiz and 512MB RAM aren't getting the update, but why not the Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7* which has 1GB RAM?


* For those that don't know Samsung's first 7" model was simply called Galxy Tab which came with 512MB RAM.

The only Samsung Galaxy Tab is not getting the Android 4.0 was the first one (2010).
All the Galaxy Tab with Honeycombs, including the Tab 7" Plus will get it.
The Tab 7.7" is the new Samsung gold-cup, I really doubt Samsung won´t push Android 4 for it.
post #26 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I understand why Samsung devices with TouchWiz and 512MB RAM aren't getting the update, but why not the Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7* which has 1GB RAM?
...

But it is getting ICS.

http://global.samsungtomorrow.com/?p=8894

I sure hope Android-curious people get their info elsewhere than AI...
post #27 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperTomcat View Post

You don´t have idea of appliance line products/customers...

Then why don't you explain to us why Twitter on a fridge door 4 feet off the ground is such a groundbreaking concept for appliance line products/customers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

But it is getting ICS.

http://global.samsungtomorrow.com/?p=8894

I sure hope Android-curious people get their info elsewhere than AI...

That's good, from a logical standpoint.

And I got my info elsewhere, I previously read that Samsung had not stated anything about the 7" tabs.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #28 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

As noted in part one, the success of Apple's MacBook Air has driven Intel to inspire its Ultrabooks initiative. Here's a look at how the rest of the industry has chased Apple at this year's CES, starting with Samsung and its fiercely independent new role as an Android licensee...

Quote:
Samsung's Galaxy Note takes on the iPad, with a phone

It's insane to believe the Note is meant to take on the iPad. It's a smartphone with pressure-sensitive stylus for writing and drawing. Samsung's answers to the iPad is the Galaxy Tab line, not the Note. I see the Note as an addition to the Galaxy S smartphones.

Quote:
While Samsung has been chastised for "slavishly copying" Apple in its smartphone and tablet designs, the Galaxy Note is a new response to the iPad from Samsung, a mini-tablet that incorporates the stylus features that Apple's Steve Jobs mocked five years ago as the wrong way to go about working with mobile devices.

The Note still has capacitive touchscreen does it not? Having the CAPABILITY to use a pressure-sensitive stylus in ADDITION to finger touch is a plus. If the stylus is the ONLY way to interact with the Note, then it would be wrong. But it's clearly not.

Quote:
At first glance, the Galaxy Note looks like a smaller, simpler iPad, evoking memories of how Palm's 1997-era cheap, simple $300 Pilot rapidly took over the PDA market that Apple had originally coined with its $700 Newton MessagePad three years earlier. The difference today, however, is that the Galaxy Note isn't cheap.

An iPhone 4S 16GB unlocked no-contract is $800 on Amazon. Your point is?

Quote:
While the Pilot was less than half the price of a MessagePad, Samsung's 16GB Galaxy Note is $760-$900 on Amazon, considerably more than the 16GB 3G iPad 2 (which Amazon sells for $550-$630). In large part, that's because the Note incorporates all the features of a high end LTE smartphone, including an 8 megapixel camera and a "near Retina" 285ppi Super AMOLED 1280x800 display.

Can you make a regular phone call with the iPad 2 3G? The answer is NO. You would need to use a voice app to that. The Note is functionally the same as an iPhone 4S as a smartphone, except it has a bigger screen and a digitizer for pen. The iPad cost should be compared to the Galaxy Tab 10.1, which is $448 (16GB), $548 (32GB) on Amazon.

Quote:
The Galaxy Note also packs on the full horsepower of a dual core 1.4 GHz Cortex A9 Exynos or 1.5 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon (there are multiple hardware versions of the Note running SoCs with different graphics cores) and a full gigibyte of RAM, features that eat up battery life but are essential to running Android fast enough to feel responsive.

Only Apple is allowed to use dual core processors, right? Here's a quote from Engadget ( http://www.engadget.com/2011/10/28/s...y-note-review/ ):

"Battery life is phenomenal. While you'd expect solid performance from a 2500mAh battery, it's having to power a massive screen (both in terms of size and pixel count) and ultra-fast CPU -- energy vampires for sure. Our battery rundown test (playing a video in a loop starting from a full charge) achieved an impressive 9 hours and 36 minutes, putting the Galaxy Note right into iPad territory."

Quote:
Solo not Holo

Samsung's "go it alone" opposition strategy has included creating its own TouchWiz user interface for its Android phones, something that Samsung used as an excuse not to roll out Android 4.0 to customers of its relatively new Nexus S, a direct attack on Google's Android Upgrade Alliance, which was supposed to commit licenses to roll out upgrades for their Android devices for at least 18 months.

Samsung's move was particularly embarrassing for Google because the Nexus S was supposed to be a cobranded Google model lacking unnecessary third party baggage and supposedly providing the best upgrade service that Android buyers could expect. It was first released in December 2010, making it about six months newer than iPhone 4, and barely 12 months old when Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich rolled out on the Samsung/Google Galaxy Nexus last month.

The article that you linked to says exactly the OPPOSITE of what you wrote here. Is this an intentional lie or some typo? The article that you linked to says, "But the Galaxy S sports the same internal hardware as Google's Nexus S smartphone, and Nexus S owners can already obtain Android 4.0 through an over-the-air update." I think you meant the Galaxy S. But Samsung never promised ICS for the Galaxy S line.
post #29 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

This is an idea just a little ahead of its time. As RFID tags get cheaper and cheaper, a "smart refrigerator" could keep track of what is or is not in your refrigerator and pre-order groceries for you. Connect that to your grocery stores supply chain and big efficiencies could be made, driving down prices.

I agree that as it stands, I don't get it, but a refrigerator with intelligence could be a powerful idea.

I don't think it will catch on. At my house most food in the fridge is fresh, some of it from our garden. Partial solutions rarely become ubiquitous. If everything you eat has a bar code on it you have bigger problems than a smart refrigerator can solve.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #30 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Then why don't you explain to us why Twitter on a fridge door 4 feet off the ground is such a groundbreaking concept for appliance line products/customers.

Apps is not just for Twitter, Facebook or any other social app. The option for connection, remote control, notifications are present in the apps.
A fridge with apps, for product expire notification, redistribution of products by quality, type and temperature would run and would be updated like an app.
Image gallery, TV and radio programs, internet browsers and social networking are just more option for these products.
Many people go to appliance store to ask for the biggest, the simplest washing/drying machine, no more than 1 set of cloth of the simplest way to that work. I really doubt a housewife doesn´t love control all those appliances from a smartphone wherever she is and not have to wait for her cloth or to know what she have on the fridge.
post #31 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperTomcat View Post

Apps is not just for Twitter, Facebook or any other social app. The option for connection, remote control, notifications are present in the apps.
A fridge with apps, for product expire notification, redistribution of products by quality, type and temperature would run and would be updated like an app.
Image gallery, TV and radio programs, internet browsers and social networking are just more option for these products.
Many people go to appliance store to ask for the biggest, the simplest washing/drying machine, no more than 1 set of cloth of the simplest way to that work. I really doubt a housewife doesn´t love control all those appliances from a smartphone wherever she is and not have to wait for her cloth or to know what she have on the fridge.

That's the problem, we're talking about a smart fridge that is monitoring the fridge and letting you know when it needs your attention, we're talking about pointless apps being pushed to an appliance because we can.

We can put an HDTV in the front of a consumer oven with a webcam in the oven instead of using a window but you aren't going to come up with a reason why this makes sense just like you didn't come up with a reason why a fridge should have Twitter. How about a stock ticker that runs around the edge of a counter top of the stock trader who also loves to cook.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #32 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Is it just me or is a refrigerator that runs apps one of the stupidest ideas that this industry has ever come up with?

Ericsson/Electrolux had prototypes way back in 2000 with refrigerators that had WAP.
It was pretty useful. Your phone/fridge new what you had in the fridge, when the stuff expired.
= Automatic shopping lists to refill what you have used.

They had loads of cool stuff that have not come into production 12 years later.

My other favorite demo was the WAP enabled car. You WAPed into the car and started the heater from you living room. Could see status of the car, how much fuel and so on.

I want this NOW!
post #33 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by shompa View Post

Ericsson/Electrolux had prototypes way back in 2000 with refrigerators that had WAP.
It was pretty useful. Your phone/fridge new what you had in the fridge, when the stuff expired.
= Automatic shopping lists to refill what you have used.

How would it know what you had in the fridge? Wold you have to manually input everything with names and expiration dates? How is this "pretty useful" over just looking at the items's dates in your fridge or writing this down someplace that's actually convenient?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #34 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by shompa View Post

My other favorite demo was the WAP enabled car. You WAPed into the car and started the heater from you living room. Could see status of the car, how much fuel and so on.

I want this NOW!

That is actually illegal in my home town in Colorado. We call it huffing. People want to warm up their car in the winter but they leave it running in the driveway for 30 minutes sometimes, which causes a lot of unnecessary pollution.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #35 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

This is an idea just a little ahead of its time. As RFID tags get cheaper and cheaper, a "smart refrigerator" could keep track of what is or is not in your refrigerator and pre-order groceries for you. Connect that to your grocery stores supply chain and big efficiencies could be made, driving down prices.

I agree that as it stands, I don't get it, but a refrigerator with intelligence could be a powerful idea.

Yes, I can understand the concept of using RFID tags being tracked by a refrigerator. But why does the refrigerator need to run Angry birds, for example?
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #36 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinN206 View Post

It's insane to believe the Note is meant to take on the iPad. It's a smartphone with pressure-sensitive stylus for writing and drawing. Samsung's answers to the iPad is the Galaxy Tab line, not the Note. I see the Note as an addition to the Galaxy S smartphones.


The Note still has capacitive touchscreen does it not? Having the CAPABILITY to use a pressure-sensitive stylus in ADDITION to finger touch is a plus. If the stylus is the ONLY way to interact with the Note, then it would be wrong. But it's clearly not.


An iPhone 4S 16GB unlocked no-contract is $800 on Amazon. Your point is?


Can you make a regular phone call with the iPad 2 3G? The answer is NO. You would need to use a voice app to that. The Note is functionally the same as an iPhone 4S as a smartphone, except it has a bigger screen and a digitizer for pen. The iPad cost should be compared to the Galaxy Tab 10.1, which is $448 (16GB), $548 (32GB) on Amazon.


Only Apple is allowed to use dual core processors, right? Here's a quote from Engadget ( http://www.engadget.com/2011/10/28/s...y-note-review/ ):

"Battery life is phenomenal. While you'd expect solid performance from a 2500mAh battery, it's having to power a massive screen (both in terms of size and pixel count) and ultra-fast CPU -- energy vampires for sure. Our battery rundown test (playing a video in a loop starting from a full charge) achieved an impressive 9 hours and 36 minutes, putting the Galaxy Note right into iPad territory."


The article that you linked to says exactly the OPPOSITE of what you wrote here. Is this an intentional lie or some typo? The article that you linked to says, "But the Galaxy S sports the same internal hardware as Google's Nexus S smartphone, and Nexus S owners can already obtain Android 4.0 through an over-the-air update." I think you meant the Galaxy S. But Samsung never promised ICS for the Galaxy S line.

All excellent points, No Doubt, but actual facts such as the ones you've outlined have never mattered one iota to the likes of Daniel Eran Dilger (aka DeD on Arrival) and his ilk.
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
Reply
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
Reply
post #37 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... .... fiercely independent ... Android licensee.

Thus far, the best oxymoron of 2012!
post #38 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Yes, I can understand the concept of using RFID tags being tracked by a refrigerator. But why does the refrigerator need to run Angry birds, for example?

your mistake is confusing "has the ability to" with "needs to"
post #39 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

How is nobody realizing the complete and blatant error on the part of the author? I love Apple as much as the next, but don't make up stuff to try to make a point. Android 4.0 was not held from the Nexus S because of TouchWiz, it was held from their Galaxy S II models. I still think that's rediculous and horrible service to their paying customers, but the Nexus S, I believe, already got 4.0.

"Blatant" means openly and unashamedly. Using that word to refer to a minor error involving brand names and numbers is a bit over the top, even for a cluster of Apple foeboys desperately seeking to attack an article via typos and minutia because they have nothing to criticize about the actual content.

Even so, only select Nexus S owners got ICS before the spigot was turned off to figure out what was wrong with the update and fix things. Last I heard, it's still not available for Nexus S owners, the only group that has even been offered an update.

So yes, you're right about Samsung's "rediculous and horrible service to their paying customers."
post #40 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinN206 View Post

It's insane to believe the Note is meant to take on the iPad. It's a smartphone with pressure-sensitive stylus for writing and drawing. Samsung's answers to the iPad is the Galaxy Tab line, not the Note. I see the Note as an addition to the Galaxy S smartphones

If you think Samsung would suddenly be making tablets that looked any different from Microsoft's reference designs if Apple had not launched the iPad to great success, you are too delusional to be having a discussion with. Saying the Note is a reaction to the iPad is both factually accurate and does not imply any wrongdoing on the part of Samsung, so it's hard to see what you're so bent out of shape about here.

Quote:
The Note still has capacitive touchscreen does it not? Having the CAPABILITY to use a pressure-sensitive stylus in ADDITION to finger touch is a plus. If the stylus is the ONLY way to interact with the Note, then it would be wrong. But it's clearly not.

Why you are complaining about a stylus being "wrong" is difficult to understand, given that nowhere in the article does it say a stylus is "wrong" outside of noting Steve Jobs' opinion on the subject. Maybe you need to calm down a notch or two mr hysterical.


Quote:
An iPhone 4S 16GB unlocked no-contract is $800 on Amazon. Your point is?

Nobody buys unlocked iPhones from Amazon. Apple's US sales are all coming from subsidized contracts, which is what Samsung is competing with. The iPad is not subsidized. Is the Galaxy Note going to become a mainstream phone with subsidies? Once it does we can talk about how much it actually costs and/or appears to cost to buyers. So far, the only source for buying it is Amazon.

Quote:
Can you make a regular phone call with the iPad 2 3G? The answer is NO. You would need to use a voice app to that. The Note is functionally the same as an iPhone 4S as a smartphone, except it has a bigger screen and a digitizer for pen. The iPad cost should be compared to the Galaxy Tab 10.1, which is $448 (16GB), $548 (32GB) on Amazon.

Shocking that Samsung doesn't have any buyers then! That's a whopping $50 discount from the iPad 2.

Quote:
Only Apple is allowed to use dual core processors, right?

Again, in you hysterical fit you fail to note that the article is describing the Note's specs, not passing judgement on the MHz numbers. It simply observed that despite being clocked faster than the iPhone 4S, it doesn't feel like it because its running a year + old version of Android.

Quote:
Here's a quote from Engadget ( http://www.engadget.com/2011/10/28/s...y-note-review/ ):

"Battery life is phenomenal. While you'd expect solid performance from a 2500mAh battery, it's having to power a massive screen (both in terms of size and pixel count) and ultra-fast CPU -- energy vampires for sure. Our battery rundown test (playing a video in a loop starting from a full charge) achieved an impressive 9 hours and 36 minutes, putting the Galaxy Note right into iPad territory."

Well most people do real things with the mobile, like say, use the mobile part. Once you have GPU accelerated hardware, playing video isn't exactly an example of something that runs the battery down. Real tests would include WiFi and mobile network activity, not playing video in a loop. Hard to believe Engadget is that stupid, or that you didn't observe that reality on your own, given your hair trigger to perceived factual errors on AI.

Maybe you just want to believe certain things?

Even Apple's iPhone ratings say 10 hours of video, 40 hours of audio,, 9 hours of WiFi internet, 8 hours of 3G talk time, or 6 hours of 3G Internet.

I wonder what Engadget would find if it actually turned on 4G and did some real world testing? On the Galaxy Nexus, doing that discharges the battery fast **even when the thing is plugged into a car charger**.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPad
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Reacting to Apple at CES 2012, part two: Samsung's Galaxy Note