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Apple could water-proof future devices with HzO technology - Page 2

post #41 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Enjoy your cancers.

Thats all I'm going to say.

Also, dont stand in front of laser printers' paper output slot.

You'll inhale something you dont want in your lungs.

I'm glad they've finally gotten rid of CRT monitors.

One less fumes you have to worry about.

You forgot to mention "chem-trails" to really make yourself sound silly.
post #42 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evilution View Post

You forgot to mention "chem-trails" to really make yourself sound silly.

It your health, not mine.

Dont say I didnt warn ya.

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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post #43 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

It your health, not mine.

Dont say I didnt warn ya.

That explains why he doesn't use any Apple products; he's terrified of everything electronic. Wonder how he's posting here.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #44 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Apple doesnt have Corning's Gorilla Glass on their devices. They have iShield.

Actually, they do use Cornings' Gorilla Glass. From the bio (yes, again, I can't help it):

The natural place to look was Asia, where the glass for the stores was being made. But Jobss friend John Seeley Brown, who was on the board of Corning Glass in Upstate New York, told him that he should talk to that companys young and dynamic CEO, Wendell Weeks. So he dialed the main Corning switchboard number and asked to be put through to Weeks. He got an assistant, who offered to pass along the message. No, Im Steve Jobs, he replied. Put me through. The assistant refused. Jobs called Brown and complained that he had been subjected to typical East Coast bullshit. When Weeks heard that, he called the main Apple switchboard and asked to speak to Jobs. He was told to put his request in writing and send it in by fax. When Jobs was told what happened, he took a liking to Weeks and invited him to Cupertino.
Jobs described the type of glass Apple wanted for the iPhone, and Weeks told him that Corning had developed a chemical exchange process in the 1960s that led to what they dubbed gorilla glass. It was incredibly strong, but it had never found a market, so Corning quit making it. Jobs said he doubted it was good enough, and he started explaining to Weeks how glass was made. This amused Weeks, who of course knew more than Jobs about that topic. Can you shut up, Weeks interjected, and let me teach you some science? Jobs was taken aback and fell silent. Weeks went to the whiteboard and gave a tutorial on the chemistry, which involved an ion-exchange process that produced a compression layer on the surface of the glass. This turned Jobs around, and he said he wanted as much gorilla glass as Corning could make within six months. We dont have the capacity, Weeks replied. None of our plants make the glass now.
Dont be afraid, Jobs replied. This stunned Weeks, who was good-humored and confident but not used to Jobss reality distortion field. He tried to explain that a false sense of confidence would not overcome engineering challenges, but that was a premise that Jobs had repeatedly shown he didnt accept. He stared at Weeks unblinking. Yes, you can do it, he said. Get your mind around it. You can do it.
As Weeks retold this story, he shook his head in astonishment. We did it in under six months, he said. We produced a glass that had never been made. Cornings facility in Harrisburg, Kentucky, which had been making LCD displays, was converted almost overnight to make gorilla glass full-time. We put our best scientists and engineers on it, and we just made it work. In his airy office, Weeks has just one framed memento on display. Its a message Jobs sent the day the iPhone came out: We couldnt have done it without you.
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
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How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
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post #45 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Actually, they do use Cornings' Gorilla Glass. From the bio (yes, again, I can't help it):
[...]

What's worse is says Apple uses a plastic covering from a 3rd-party which is completely false.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #46 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjwal View Post

It's about time someone made a waterproof phone. Waterproof watches have been around for ages. All it takes is a little rubber gasket.

Phones are more complex though and they need to dissipate heat as well as emit and receive sound. A watch can be sealed up as much as possible without affecting its function.

The HzO coating is pretty much the best solution to the problem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxZgr4O2cz8

That company is going to make one hell of a lot of money because it is suitable for any and ever piece of electronic equipment in existence, including watches.

Even if the coating wore out over time it would still protect the device through the most important period of its ownership. I'd say laptops probably need this more than anything to avoid damage from keyboard spillage.
post #47 of 81
Its already in millions of devices already so it is well tried and tested.

It should help increase reliability and won't impact ion the strategic use of those moisture detectors.
post #48 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

I'd say laptops probably need this more than anything to avoid damage from keyboard spillage.

That would be great, but it might not be quite that simple. In my experience the liquids are often sticky, causing other problems that this might not mitigate. I guess though that it would make the keyboard washable.
post #49 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4miler View Post

Recently my iPhone and I were caught in a torrential downpour soaking me to the core, and the iPhone was drenched. The phone was in a bag, but the bag got soaked through.

Naturally the water-damage repair was not covered by AppleCare. The Apple Genius confirmed that the iPhone has sensors that detect whether there has been water ingress - presumably so Apple knows whether to cover it with AppleCare, or whether to make us pay extra money.

I suggest to Apple that - rather than spending engineering effort to put water sensors to detect if we've got the phone wet (so they don't have to provide AppleCare - they should channel their engineering efforts to provide the iPhone with a degree of water resistance.

But purely looking at this from a money-hungry, greed viewpoint, it'd save Apple more money by just having water-sensors so they don't have to cover water damage repairs under AppleCare. Also, making it waterproof would loose Apple some revenue from forcing customers to buy replacement iPhones that they've gotten wet. So, given that Apple consistently takes the route that brings in more money, I'd say we're not going to see a waterproof/water resistant iPhone any time soon.

Since the technology exists to make iPhones waterproof or water resistant, I would not be surprised if there are such hawks in Apple's corporate tower that sit there and say - no, rather than making the iPhone waterproof, we'll instead include water sensors, so we can make more money.

I don't agree. I'd be willing to bet Apple would definitely incorporate this technology once they've vetted it
What is really factored into the price is a kind of perpetual sense of disbelief that any company could be as good as Apple is. ~Retrogusto
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What is really factored into the price is a kind of perpetual sense of disbelief that any company could be as good as Apple is. ~Retrogusto
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post #50 of 81
"I'm sure the lights they use in their stores aren't low-power florescence, because it would make the products look bad."

I believe they use LED light fixtures manufactured by ERCO.
post #51 of 81
I wanna read my iPad inna tub.
post #52 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4miler View Post

Recently my iPhone and I were caught in a torrential downpour soaking me to the core, and the iPhone was drenched. The phone was in a bag, but the bag got soaked through.

Naturally the water-damage repair was not covered by AppleCare. The Apple Genius confirmed that the iPhone has sensors that detect whether there has been water ingress - presumably so Apple knows whether to cover it with AppleCare, or whether to make us pay extra money.

I suggest to Apple that - rather than spending engineering effort to put water sensors to detect if we've got the phone wet (so they don't have to provide AppleCare - they should channel their engineering efforts to provide the iPhone with a degree of water resistance.

The "sensor" is are just adhesive-backed paper discs that changes color when water touches it. Hardly an expensive technology. This new stuff does sound costlier, but I don't see any reason why Apple isn't investigating their options. Engineering is a complicated endevor, and the stuff must be non-toxic, environmentally friendly, pass world wide regulations, and then there are human factors as well.

Quote:
But purely looking at this from a money-hungry, greed viewpoint, it'd save Apple more money by just having water-sensors so they don't have to cover water damage repairs under AppleCare. Also, making it waterproof would loose Apple some revenue from forcing customers to buy replacement iPhones that they've gotten wet. So, given that Apple consistently takes the route that brings in more money, I'd say we're not going to see a waterproof/water resistant iPhone any time soon.

Since the technology exists to make iPhones waterproof or water resistant, I would not be surprised if there are such hawks in Apple's corporate tower that sit there and say - no, rather than making the iPhone waterproof, we'll instead include water sensors, so we can make more money.

You do realize that this is a NEW technology here, right? They can't just retroactively apply it to old phones.
post #53 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I always think it's funny when an American company uses the "z" in a product name and it's clear that they intend it to be pronounced "ZEE" not realising that the majority of the world actually pronounces this letter as "ZED" making the proposed product name totally silly to say. It's like a classic American blind spot.

Edit: even more hilarious that they chose an announcer with an English accent to say "zee."


Zima

Zomething Different

   I am long on my shares of AAPL at $37.00

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   I am long on my shares of AAPL at $37.00

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post #54 of 81
Having gotten caught in the rain on the way him from the gym last month, I just tossed my shorts in the dryer.

Having taken a bath towel to the greasy screen of my iPhone last week, I slipped up and tossed it into 18" of water in the tub.

Strangely, both devices survived with no apparent ill effects, but nonetheless Please. My apparent aquatic lifestyle requires this kind of support.
post #55 of 81
I always think people who're convinced there is a "correct" pronunciation or accent are parochial at best, bigots at worst. The malleability of language is the major part of its beauty and strength. Each generation creates it anew out of available materials.

Fortunately most of us have no problem with multiple definitions, pronunciations, and inflections, being able to evaluate such subtleties in context without undue confusion. Or silly judgments.
post #56 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Enjoy your cancers.

Thats all I'm going to say.

Also, dont stand in front of laser printers' paper output slot.

You'll inhale something you dont want in your lungs.

I'm glad they've finally gotten rid of CRT monitors.

One less fumes you have to worry about.

Finally quit CRT? Took you long enough.

CRTs have been in use for the better part of a century, if they caused cancer, it would be quite an epidemic.

Ozone hasn't been linked with cancer yet in humans. Animal studies were inconclusive.
post #57 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

CRTs have been in use for the better part of a century, if they caused cancer, it would be quite an epidemic.

Never mind all the radio waves floating around since the turn of the last century and the cell transmissions since the late 80s. Oh, and the microwaves in homes. Better wear lead-lined undergarments.

And the people who claim to be affected by Wi-Fi. That's a crock. Anyone moves into my neighborhood and tells me to shut down my Wi-Fi network, I'll laugh in their face. Oh, no, even better, I'll tell them to make their house out of aluminum.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #58 of 81
It's Zee, sing the song again, you'll see.

Two points though:
-I've got caught in a flash storm jogging with my iPhone 4S. I turned the phone off as soon as I could, when I got home, the phone didn't even seem wet, regardless I gave it an hour or so to dry, turned it on. No Problem.
Short of dropping it in a pool, I think our devices are more robust against this kind of thing than we know.

-Apple wouldn't be able to market this unless the method was 100% fullproof. If you were to drop your device and the impact were to crack a component enough to let water through the barrier, your device would be dead. Then what about heat? What about cold? I doubt this product would be like Jesus' feet when he went for a stroll on that lake (sea?) and so if ever the product was less than perfect, Apple would get bit.

But that doesn't prevent them from doing it anyway and not marketing it, simply so they could be that company that doesn't even advertise waterproofing, but whose devices are too good to need to advertise an obviously necessary feature like that
post #59 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjwal View Post

It's about time someone made a waterproof phone. Waterproof watches have been around for ages. All it takes is a little rubber gasket.

Little rubber gaskets require little channels to accommodate them, adding to the device's size. This is a significant issue for a product where 1mm of extra thickness is immediately noticeable. Also, watches don't have headphone or charging ports.
post #60 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

It's Zee, sing the song again, you'll see.

Two points though:
-I've got caught in a flash storm jogging with my iPhone 4S. I turned the phone off as soon as I could, when I got home, the phone didn't even seem wet, regardless I gave it an hour or so to dry, turned it on. No Problem.
Short of dropping it in a pool, I think our devices are more robust against this kind of thing than we know.

-Apple wouldn't be able to market this unless the method was 100% fullproof. If you were to drop your device and the impact were to crack a component enough to let water through the barrier, your device would be dead. Then what about heat? What about cold? I doubt this product would be like Jesus' feet when he went for a stroll on that lake (sea?) and so if ever the product was less than perfect, Apple would get bit.

But that doesn't prevent them from doing it anyway and not marketing it, simply so they could be that company that doesn't even advertise waterproofing, but whose devices are too good to need to advertise an obviously necessary feature like that

A friend dropped his iPhone in the toilet. He quickly rinsed it off, dried it with paper towels and then placed it in a bag packed with uncooked rice. Couple days later the phone was dry, inside and out, and the phone has worked fine since then (months ago.) Somebody should market this as a "water damage recovery kit".
post #61 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

A friend dropped his iPhone in the toilet. He quickly rinsed it off, dried it with paper towels and then placed it in a bag packed with uncooked rice. Couple days later the phone was dry, inside and out, and the phone has worked fine since then (months ago.) Somebody should market this as a "water damage recovery kit".

http://www.ifixit.com/Tools/Thirsty-Bag/IF145-163

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #62 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I always think it's funny when an American company uses the "z" in a product name and it's clear that they intend it to be pronounced "ZEE" not realising that the majority of the world actually pronounces this letter as "ZED" making the proposed product name totally silly to say. It's like a classic American blind spot.

Edit: even more hilarious that they chose an announcer with an English accent to say "zee."


What's an "English" accent? I'm an American and I speak English not "American." Do you mean British accent?
post #63 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesomorphicman View Post

What's an "English" accent? I'm an American and I speak English not "American." Do you mean British accent?

He means English: of or relating to England or its people or language.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #64 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesomorphicman View Post

What's an "English" accent? I'm an American and I speak English not "American." Do you mean British accent?

To my understanding, Britain would include England, Scotland, and Wales, while England is just England. Somebody from the UK please help as we Americans do not really understand the distinction.

We've always been at war with Eastasia...

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We've always been at war with Eastasia...

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post #65 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by HyteProsector View Post

I'm really thinking the iPhone 5 (aka iPhone 4G) is going to be a show stopper. It was the last thing Jobs worked on before he died. I'm thinking an oval capacitive touch home screen button. With simplistic gestures: swipe to go back, forward, double tap (not push) to zoom.

This will allow users to keep their thumb over the home button more often. Over the screen less often and probably allow for the justification of a larger screen, as more action will be on the home button and not on the screen.

Thoughts?

Fantastic theory, I'd love to see something that intuitive implemented in the new iPhone
post #66 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I always think it's funny when an American company uses the "z" in a product name and it's clear that they intend it to be pronounced "ZEE" not realising that the majority of the world actually pronounces this letter as "ZED" making the proposed product name totally silly to say. It's like a classic American blind spot.

Edit: even more hilarious that they chose an announcer with an English accent to say "zee."

Or even far more hilarious when it is not pronounced "zee" when it should be as in a product with a name like E Z Open.
(on way to hospital)...
post #67 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

Little rubber gaskets require little channels to accommodate them, adding to the device's size.

A channel is less material, not more.
post #68 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tk2x View Post

There is no quicker way to kill a deal that is in discussion, than to desperately leak it to the press. So assume that this WON'T happen.

Double when that deal is allegedly with Apple. They are loathe to have any partner speak before they have done so about anything.

That said, saying they are talking to Apple could merely mean that they called the corporate office to book a meeting. And as such it is stock play and possibly nothing more or less. They are going to or have made a pitch but who is to say that Apple said yes.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #69 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

A channel is less material, not more.

Not necessarily. Sometimes, in fact often, you need to thicken a wall in order to provide enough thickness to accommodate a gasket or to exert sufficient pressure on it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

Little rubber gaskets require little channels to accommodate them, adding to the device's size. This is a significant issue for a product where 1mm of extra thickness is immediately noticeable. Also, watches don't have headphone or charging ports.

It's not always necessary to use a channel to accommodate gaskets.

Regardless, gaskets are not part of the HzO technology, to the best of my knowledge.
post #70 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesomorphicman View Post

What's an "English" accent? I'm an American and I speak English not "American." Do you mean British accent?

Quote:
Originally Posted by diplication View Post

To my understanding, Britain would include England, Scotland, and Wales, while England is just England. Somebody from the UK please help as we Americans do not really understand the distinction.

You are correct. Britain is England, Scotland and Wales. The United Kingdom is Great Britain and Northern Ireland. While English is a common language, I don't think Americans can reasonably claim an English accent, since accents are essentially regional variations, and England, from which the adjective English is derived, is not in the USA.
post #71 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

It's Zee, sing the song again, you'll see.

Which song? The ABC song? The one that goes:
A, B, C, D, ....... X, Y, Z,
X, Y, Z, Suger on the Bread. If you don't like it better go to bed...

That one?
post #72 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tk2x View Post

There is no quicker way to kill a deal that is in discussion, than to desperately leak it to the press. So assume that this WON'T happen.

Any chance this company had has been blown.

Beyond that something tells me details about this process are missing.
post #73 of 81
HzO sounds pretty neato to me. I love all this new technology and only wish I was 10 years old right now, with a big bank account.

Maybe they can invent an invisible nano coating that gives the iPhone a rubberized grip while they're at it. I hate having to buy cases just so you can hang on to the thing.

Lastly, if there isn't a market with Apple, I'm sure some enterprising nerd can turn this magic film into some sort of birth control.
post #74 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by humanifestation1 View Post

Did you mean to say "aesthetics"? Because something like an iPhone wouldn't really fit into the lifestyle of an "ascetic".

Yeah that's what I meant ...
post #75 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tk2x View Post

There is no quicker way to kill a deal that is in discussion, than to desperately leak it to the press. So assume that this WON'T happen.

True, especially when it involves a secretive company like Apple.
post #76 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

It strikes me as a bad idea to say you're in discussions with Apple. I call BS, because Apple generally doesn't seem to want its suppliers talking about deals, even prospective deals.

For all we know they sent Apple a brochure and then called to get an appointment. It might be impossible to know for sure until the phone is released.
post #77 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The company says that WaterBlock is a non-toxic, organic material that is safe for people to use. It also doesn't change the aesthetics of a device or add any weight.
[/url][/c]

No indication of the actual process but it's unlikely to involve any new chemistry. I'm guessing a silicone water repellent ('Mr Sheen' for electronics) - some silicones give water-droplet contact angles as great as 160 deg. Brilliant if it works as advertised! If so, Apple and others are likely to adopt or endorse it since it would save megabucks on warrantee repair bills (yes, water damage is excluded but I know of several instances where Apple has footed the bill for such accidents).
post #78 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by enzos View Post

No indication of the actual process but it's unlikely to involve any new chemistry. I'm guessing a silicone water repellent ('Mr Sheen' for electronics) - some silicones give water-droplet contact angles as great as 160 deg. Brilliant if it works as advertised! If so, Apple and others are likely to adopt or endorse it since it would save megabucks on warrantee repair bills (yes, water damage is excluded but I know of several instances where Apple has footed the bill for such accidents).

What warranty repair costs? Better reread your Apple warranty language that excludes water damage from coverage. When your iDevice goes kaput, the first thing they do at the Genius Bar is scope the audio jack and other connectors to see if the water exposure indicators have been triggered.

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

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I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

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post #79 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post

What warranty repair costs? Better reread your Apple warranty language that excludes water damage from coverage. When your iDevice goes kaput, the first thing they do at the Genius Bar is scope the audio jack and other connectors to see if the water exposure indicators have been triggered.

It's impressive the number of times I've seen firsthand Apple replace a product that was accidentally damaged and not covered under AppleCare+.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #80 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

HzO, the maker of a "WaterBlock" technology shown off at last week's Consumer Electronics Show, has said it is in talks with Apple about using its material in future devices, including the iPhone.

HzO was promoting its nano-scale film barrier at CES last week, pitching it as a potential solution to waterproof expensive electronic equipment. One of their demonstrations included submerging an iPhone into water, and having it remain in proper working order.

HzO's technology is similar to the nano-coating process demonstrated at CES by P2i, branded "Aridion" and profiled yesterday. A video demonstration of Aridion-treated paper also appeared in this week's Weekend Tech Review. The technology is already in use by Motorola on both its Droid RAZR smartphone and XYBOARD tablet.

While speaking to attendees at the show, officials with HzO said that Apple is among the companies that have shown interest in the water repelling technology, according to Pocket-lint. Company officials said Apple was interested in making a future iPhone waterproof, potentially with a sixth-generation model expected to be released later this year.

"We expect HzO to be in next season's phones," the company reportedly said.

In addition to Apple, its rival Samsung is also said to have shown interest in HzO's technology. The company said it showed a Samsung executive a waterproofed Galaxy S smartphone, and that company officials were "really excited" by what they saw.

HzO's WaterBlock technology protects the insides of devices on a molecular scale. It has been used in demonstrations to protect a number of Apple products, including the iPhone 4S, iPads and iPods, after the material has been applied to the devices in a vacuum deposition process.



The company says that WaterBlock is a non-toxic, organic material that is safe for people to use. It also doesn't change the aesthetics of a device or add any weight.

The technology is intended for "accidental encounters" with moisture, meaning use in deep waters or being submerged for an extended period of time is not recommended. However, HzO coated devices have reportedly been immersed in water for "many continuous hours," and they continue to work fine.

"The technology is designed to protect against failure due to jumping in a pool and forgetting your phone was in your pocket, or dropping your iPod in the sink while doing dishes, or getting caught in a torrid rain storm and getting soaked, or leaving your smartphone in your pants when they go through the wash," the company said.

Having already lost an iPhone last spring to a heavy thunderstorm, with the phone in my pocket, I welcome the technology.
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