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iPhone 4S launch propels surging Apple 20% to close the gap with Android

post #1 of 69
Thread Starter 
The launch of the iPhone 4S last October had an "enormous impact" on the U.S. smartphone landscape, boosting Apple's share among new buyers by almost 20 percent and putting it neck-and-neck with Android in December.

The latest quarterly sales data from Nielsen shows that while just 25.1 percent of American smartphone buyers in October chose an iPhone, that number ballooned to 44.5 percent in December. In addition, 57 percent of new iPhone owners polled in December indicated they bought an iPhone 4S.

Though Apple's massive spike in sales helped the company close the gap on Android, Google's mobile platform remains the most popular choice among smartphone owners in the U.S. Nielsen found that 46.3 percent of all domestic smartphone owners have an Android device, compared to the 30 percent share iOS holds.

But in October, before the iPhone 4S launched, Apple's 25.1 percent share among recent smartphone acquirers was more than 35 percentage points below Android. In November, the gap was narrowed considerably to less than 10 points, and by December, the iPhone had come within 2.5 point of Android.

Apple finished the year with a 44.5 percent share among recent smartphone buyers, nipping at the heels of Android and its 46.9 percent share.




RIM's BlackBerry platform continued a downward slide through the end of 2011, dropping from a 7.7 percent share among recent smartphone buyers in October, to just 4.5 percent in December. Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 and Windows Mobile, Nokia's Symbian, and HP's Palm webOS combined for just over 5 percent of recent purchases.

Nielsen also found that as of the fourth quarter of calendar 2011, 46 percent of U.S. mobile consumers had smartphones. The number is growing quickly, and 60 percent of those who bought a new handset in the last three months chose a smartphone.




Apple's tremendous performance in December is a major turnaround from what Nielsen found last September, when the iPhone represented 28 percent of recent smartphone sales in the U.S. At the time, Android was continuing to grow and held a 43 percent share.

At the time, Nielsen cautioned that Apple's market share could "change quickly" with the launch of a new product. Only weeks later, the company introduced the iPhone 4S.
post #2 of 69
Just wait. In 7 months, the 4 will be free on contract, the base 4S will be $99, and the 5 will be out.

And the 3GS? It becomes Apples low cost off contract solution

Apple is just getting going here

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post #3 of 69
There are many other smartphones on the market that have designs I like much better than the iPhone 4/4s. Yes, I preferred the physical build of the 3GS and original iPhone best. BUT, while I dislike the glass back of the 4/4s, I just cannot get myself to buy a phone that doesn't use iOS. Sure, I could easily give up using my iPhone and go back to a standard cell phone/computer combo, but I just don't see switching to Android.

No, I am not an Apple fanatic either. It simply seems that Android simply isn't as polished and easy to use as iOS. Don't get me wrong, Apple could really improve the iOS 5 notification panel by adding WIDGETS. But knowing Apple, we will not see any new widgets...instead we will be stuck with stocks and weather for the life of iOS 5. Come on Apple, let people build widgets for the notification bar/panel/whatever you call it.
post #4 of 69
Interesting to know, however the numbers close to product launches (especially delayed ones) aren't particularly informative about the long term trends.
post #5 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Oak View Post

Just wait. In 7 months, the 4 will be free on contract, the base 4S will be $99, and the 5 will be out.

And the 3GS? It becomes Apples low cost off contract solution

Apple is just getting going here

Not sure about the 3GS, as it's going to be really old by then & not a compelling choices (at least in the US), but I am excited about the 4 turning into the 'free' iphone. This will open it up to Sprint & Verizon to carry a free iPhone. It will be interesting to see what happens with iOS vs Android at that point.
post #6 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by lamewing View Post

...Come on Apple, let people build widgets for the notification bar/panel/whatever you call it.

Be careful what you wish for. I barely use any widgets on my Android phone. The impact on battery life and UI responsiveness can become noticeable with too many widgets. I do appreciate having the option though...
post #7 of 69
The problem here is that, in 6 months, the growth for iOS smartphone will slow again because of anticipation of iphone 5, while new Android phones will keep coming out every 3 months and maintain the lead.

IMO Apple still needs an additional model, and makes alternate launch cycles every half-year (Sep for traditional launch, Mar for variation launch). E.g. they could make a larger screen 4s model in March, and iPhone 5 in Sep.
post #8 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

Interesting to know, however the numbers close to product launches (especially delayed ones) aren't particularly informative about the long term trends.

The way I see it is that even if iPhone sales drop off in the next two quarters then you can expect even more massive sales with v. 6 of the iPhone. Android will retain its market share lead but Apple will continue to increase market share, stealing it not only from Symbian and RIM but also from Android.

That's the long term trend imho.
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post #9 of 69
So here's my question, pondering point, or whatever

Does anyone here think that the average Android user has any brand loyalty?

My thoughts are basically that any platform has some level of lock-in. However, when you lock-in with Apple you need to buy another iPhone. When you lock in with Android, you only lock-in the OS, not the vendor.

That is, Apple can count on a high percentage of their iPhone customers buying another iPhone. Samsung cannot. Since they're all the same OS, why not get the best price/performance ratio at any particular second in time?

So that implies that all of these companies need to continue in their race to the bottom against each other.

Do you agree?

I ask because I have some direct experience here. Until I upgraded her for her bday, my wife was running a 3+ year old 3G which worked perfectly. I only have experience with three owners of Android phones, one has gone through three handsets in the last year looking for one that still worked (some candy-bar phone with Android which was basically useless, then the Sony which failed continually, and finally to Samsung), another that had a similar experience and then gave up and went to BB, and finally a new owner who got an HTC for Christmas and it's already failing to receive calls.

In all of these case, and here's the issue, none of them had any brand loyalty. More importantly, most of them didn't really have any sort of syncing lock-in. A few songs, some photos, that's it.

So to me that implies that as the used market for iPhones grows, unless something radical happens on the features side, the lock-in percentage for iPhone should keep going up.

Right?
post #10 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

Interesting to know, however the numbers close to product launches (especially delayed ones) aren't particularly informative about the long term trends.

I bet that RIM are glad to hear that. They released three new phones in August and lost significant ground in the last quarter.
post #11 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by drobforever View Post

The problem here is that, in 6 months, the growth for iOS smartphone will slow again because of anticipation of iphone 5, while new Android phones will keep coming out every 3 months and maintain the lead. .

That's my take as well. This is one metric that needs a year of data, not one quarter YoY to see a trend. Surely we all expect a spike when an iPhone is newer as opposed to later. That said, China Unicom just got the ipHone (officially) at the beginning of January so that market could still keep the iPhone looking strong and I don't expect iPhone sales to be lower this quarter than last.

Quote:
IMO Apple still needs an additional model, and makes alternate launch cycles every half-year (Sep for traditional launch, Mar for variation launch). E.g. they could make a larger screen 4s model in March, and iPhone 5 in Sep.

If Apple plans to have a larger model I think 2012 is the year.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #12 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

Interesting to know, however the numbers close to product launches (especially delayed ones) aren't particularly informative about the long term trends.

Using your logic, the Android numbers should not be used for long term trends since there is a new Android device coming out that is 'better' every week.
post #13 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

Interesting to know, however the numbers close to product launches (especially delayed ones) aren't particularly informative about the long term trends.

For long term trends, check out Horace's new blog on the longevity of tech companies.

http://www.asymco.com/2012/01/18/the...ter-companies/

Does not look like Apple is doing to badly.
post #14 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

So that implies that all of these companies need to continue in their race to the bottom against each other.

Do you agree?

Spot on.
post #15 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

So here's my question, pondering point, or whatever


So to me that implies that as the used market for iPhones grows, unless something radical happens on the features side, the lock-in percentage for iPhone should keep going up.

Right?

I agree. It's a good time to own AAPL.
post #16 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by drobforever View Post

The problem here is that, in 6 months, the growth for iOS smartphone will slow again because of anticipation of iphone 5, while new Android phones will keep coming out every 3 months and maintain the lead.

IMO Apple still needs an additional model, and makes alternate launch cycles every half-year (Sep for traditional launch, Mar for variation launch). E.g. they could make a larger screen 4s model in March, and iPhone 5 in Sep.

Actually, recent reports are that the Android manufacturers are realizing that releasing new phones every 3 months is not a good business model. It increases costs across the board - from manufacturing and marketing to inventory disposal costs. I suspect you'll see a significant decrease in the frequency of new Android phone launches.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

So here's my question, pondering point, or whatever

Does anyone here think that the average Android user has any brand loyalty?

My thoughts are basically that any platform has some level of lock-in. However, when you lock-in with Apple you need to buy another iPhone. When you lock in with Android, you only lock-in the OS, not the vendor.

That is, Apple can count on a high percentage of their iPhone customers buying another iPhone. Samsung cannot. Since they're all the same OS, why not get the best price/performance ratio at any particular second in time?

So that implies that all of these companies need to continue in their race to the bottom against each other.

Do you agree?

I ask because I have some direct experience here. Until I upgraded her for her bday, my wife was running a 3+ year old 3G which worked perfectly. I only have experience with three owners of Android phones, one has gone through three handsets in the last year looking for one that still worked (some candy-bar phone with Android which was basically useless, then the Sony which failed continually, and finally to Samsung), another that had a similar experience and then gave up and went to BB, and finally a new owner who got an HTC for Christmas and it's already failing to receive calls.

In all of these case, and here's the issue, none of them had any brand loyalty. More importantly, most of them didn't really have any sort of syncing lock-in. A few songs, some photos, that's it.

So to me that implies that as the used market for iPhones grows, unless something radical happens on the features side, the lock-in percentage for iPhone should keep going up.

Right?

My experience agrees. The people I know who have Android phones have absolutely no brand loyalty and switch readily from one brand to another. Beyond that, they have SOME OS loyalty, but not as much as iOS users. Most surveys show that the percentage of iOS users who plan to buy another iOS device is significantly higher than the percentage of Android users who plan to buy another Android device.
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post #17 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

So here's my question, pondering point, or whatever…

Does anyone here think that the average Android user has any brand loyalty?

My thoughts are basically that any platform has some level of lock-in. However, when you lock-in with Apple you need to buy another iPhone. When you lock in with Android, you only lock-in the OS, not the vendor.

That is, Apple can count on a high percentage of their iPhone customers buying another iPhone. Samsung cannot. Since they're all the same OS, why not get the best price/performance ratio at any particular second in time?

So that implies that all of these companies need to continue in their race to the bottom against each other.

Do you agree?

I ask because I have some direct experience here. Until I upgraded her for her bday, my wife was running a 3+ year old 3G which worked perfectly. I only have experience with three owners of Android phones, one has gone through three handsets in the last year looking for one that still worked (some candy-bar phone with Android which was basically useless, then the Sony which failed continually, and finally to Samsung), another that had a similar experience and then gave up and went to BB, and finally a new owner who got an HTC for Christmas and it's already failing to receive calls.

In all of these case, and here's the issue, none of them had any brand loyalty. More importantly, most of them didn't really have any sort of syncing lock-in. A few songs, some photos, that's it.

So to me that implies that as the used market for iPhones grows, unless something radical happens on the features side, the lock-in percentage for iPhone should keep going up.

Right
?

You make a lot of good points but I think Samsung, the great competitor to Apple these days, is a poor example as they do have quality HW (choke full of stolen IP is irrelevant here), a certain level of lock-in with their TouchWiz UI, and the most mindshare and customer loyalty among Android-based smartphone vendors.

They still pale in comparison to Apple's modi operandi — especially when it comes to updates —*but remember Samsung's first line of defense is against all other vendors using Android OS, not Apple.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #18 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Oak View Post

Just wait. In 7 months, the 4 will be free on contract, the base 4S will be $99, and the 5 will be out.

And the 3GS? It becomes Apples low cost off contract solution

Apple is just getting going here

Agreed, Apple is now grinding it out with Andriod, Apple is in a perfect place. Before they were selling about 25% of the smart phones and taking home the lion's share of the profits. Now it appears Apple is taking in 45% of the smart phone customers and on top of that most of the profits. Droids better innovate fast while they still have monies to support R&D.
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post #19 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

So here's my question, pondering point, or whatever

Does anyone here think that the average Android user has any brand loyalty?

This only matters if you own stock in an Android OEM.

Otherwise, what's the issue? How is this any different than the Windows ecosystem (both mobile and desktop) with different OEMs?

Is it tough for OEMs? Sure.

Is it great for consumers? Most definitely. I shudder to think what smartphone ASPs would be if the only successful ecosystems were ones where there was vertical integration, essentially ensuring a limit on competition as switching brands would require consumers to switch ecosystems. Android is doing to smartphones what Windows did to computers. By commoditizing the technology, it is making accessible to everyone.

If you live in the developed world, it's quite easy to see a $600 iPhone as reasonably priced (quite often also because you're getting it on contract). Go to places like India, where people often pay the full price and then some for iDevices and take a look at Apple's marketshare there.

That's not to say, that Apple's strategy is pointless. It's profitable for Apple and yields the best tech in the world. But this idea that it is the only way to win or the best path for all consumers is flawed. Lack of brand loyalty to OEMs never hurt the Windows ecosystem. The diversity of OEMs actually propelled personal computing forward. It'll work the same way for both Android and Windows Phone.

And this is good for companies like Apple. This ensures that vertically integrated products will always command a healthy premium (err...unless you're RIM).
post #20 of 69
"Though Apple's massive spike in sales helped the company close the gap on Android, Google's mobile platform remains the most popular choice among smartphone owners in the U.S. Nielsen found that 46.3 percent of all domestic smartphone owners have an Android device, compared to the 30 percent share iOS holds."

The cheerleading here doesn't change the fact that this is temporary. A new product will always produce a spike. But if you look closely iOS Smartphone share is losing ground fast. The days of iPhone leading the market as long gone.
post #21 of 69
Let's see if we can ignore the troll's clearly inflammatory and incorrect remarks.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #22 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


.

We don't know anything until slapppy explains this graph to us ignorants.

EDIT: OK I see, I am late with my post. The all knowing slapppy has already spoken.
post #23 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

So here's my question, pondering point, or whatever

Does anyone here think that the average Android user has any brand loyalty?

My thoughts are basically that any platform has some level of lock-in. However, when you lock-in with Apple you need to buy another iPhone. When you lock in with Android, you only lock-in the OS, not the vendor.

That is, Apple can count on a high percentage of their iPhone customers buying another iPhone. Samsung cannot. Since they're all the same OS, why not get the best price/performance ratio at any particular second in time?

So that implies that all of these companies need to continue in their race to the bottom against each other.

Do you agree?

I ask because I have some direct experience here. Until I upgraded her for her bday, my wife was running a 3+ year old 3G which worked perfectly. I only have experience with three owners of Android phones, one has gone through three handsets in the last year looking for one that still worked (some candy-bar phone with Android which was basically useless, then the Sony which failed continually, and finally to Samsung), another that had a similar experience and then gave up and went to BB, and finally a new owner who got an HTC for Christmas and it's already failing to receive calls.

In all of these case, and here's the issue, none of them had any brand loyalty. More importantly, most of them didn't really have any sort of syncing lock-in. A few songs, some photos, that's it.

So to me that implies that as the used market for iPhones grows, unless something radical happens on the features side, the lock-in percentage for iPhone should keep going up.

Right?

I agree 100%

In my circle of friends... I see more and more of them having a crappy time with their Android phones. Most of the problems stem from crappy hardware. I know a couple friends who are on their 2nd or 3rd Droid X... I wonder if Verizon ever gets sick of replacing the same phone over and over...

When the time comes to get a new phone... they might have a sour taste in their mouth about Android as a whole... instead of the manufacturer. I'm not sure if people can separate the hardware from the software.

Thanks to "Droid" advertising... lots of people think all Android phones are Droids. And when someone hears their friends complaining about their broken Android phones time after time... that's not exactly a glowing endorsement.

I'd say Android lock-in was doomed by all the crappy Android phones in the early days.

Of course today's Android phones are way better than earlier generations. But if you've been bitten once by Android... you're probably not gonna go down that road again.

Manufacturer lock-in: Apple has it... the others don't.

People are typically happy with iPhones... and they know the next one will work the same as their previous one.

One nice thing is... when you bring home your new iPhone and plug it into your computer... your iTunes library gets copied to your iPhone. Boom... your iPhone becomes your iPod.

In contrast... barely any of my friends (non-geeks) have any music on their Android phones. They simply don't even think about it. They'd rather use their iPods!

Another interesting note: Apple is still selling the iPhone 3GS... which came out in 2009. It's obviously still good enough for Apple to put its seal of approval on... and we know how picky Apple is.

Now... imagine an Android phone from 2009 still being sold today.... a Droid Eris, for instance. I can't even type that without laughing... or cringing...
post #24 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

This only matters if you own stock in an Android OEM.

Otherwise, what's the issue? How is this any different than the Windows ecosystem (both mobile and desktop) with different OEMs?

Is it tough for OEMs? Sure.

Lack of brand loyalty to OEMs never hurt the Windows ecosystem.

Exactly... and that's why PC OEMs are engaged in a race to the bottom. All those $399 laptops aren't helping their bottom line very much.

Just a few months ago HP was thinking about getting out of the PC business.

To review: the world's largest PC manufacturer was actually considering leaving the PC business...

Sure... that announcement was penned by the wacko ex-CEO of HP.... but it does give some insight into the PC business as a whole. It's a tough place to be.

As for phones... LG and Motorola haven't made any money in years... and HTC is beginning to feel the burn as well.

Samsung is the only Android OEM that is actually doing well.

I'm generalizing this, of course... but the overall message is the same. Just because you sell phones that run Google's Android OS.... it's not exactly smooth sailing.
post #25 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by slapppy View Post


The cheerleading here doesn't change the fact that this is temporary. A new product will always produce a spike. But if you look closely iOS Smartphone share is losing ground fast. The days of iPhone leading the market as long gone.

Apple's lead in market share has been gone for over a year... where have you been?

Oh that's right... you've been here saying the same thing over and over...

You're a bigger cheerleader for "Android market share" than all the Apple folks on this Apple website put together!
post #26 of 69
Historically, new iPhone releases haven't led to a spike, but to a new baseline for sales. The only large spikes are in the holiday quarter. Of course, this year the new release coincided with the holiday quarter, so it might be a little more difficult to establish a new baseline. Sales for the 1st quarter of 2012 will probably be down 30-40% from what Apple reports for the holiday quarter next week. Last year Android sales spiked in the holiday quarter too, but this year they did not. Whether this speaks to long-term Android trends or not we'll find out in a few months.

Personally I think this is going to be an extremely good year for Apple in the US market and they may overtake Android. For that to happen in the rest of the world they need a cheaper, off-contract phone.
post #27 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Apple's lead in market share has been gone for over a year... where have you been?

Oh that's right... you've been here saying the same thing over and over...

You're a bigger cheerleader for "Android market share" than all the Apple folks on this Apple website put together!

When did Apple ever have have a dominate share of the mobile OSes? Before Android took off it Symbian was in the lead. Apple has been doing their thing, increasing their profits, while Android is eating the marketshare of the other mobile OSes and the vendors using Android OS taking a little of the profit away from non-Apple players.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #28 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by poke View Post

Personally I think this is going to be an extremely good year for Apple in the US market and they may overtake Android. For that to happen in the rest of the world they need a cheaper, off-contract phone.

Android's constant missteps is only reason Apple should be able to overtake a free OS uses by dozens of vendors on hundreds of devices, but it has to be substantial and repetitive. Even Windows has 90%+ despite their mishaps because what they do right they do very well, even though Apple is by far the most profitable PC vendor on the planet (and handset vendor).

The US market also has a 55% saturation rate, which is much faster than I would have expected. This is good news for Apple, not for Android. Android will continue to do better in emerging markets with cheaper devices and less saturation. The US with its hundreds of Apple Stores and multiple generations of smartphone users are much more inclined to buy an iPhone than an Android-based phone regardless of what they have before so I agree that the US will show the iPhone uptick in a better light (compared to the world as a whole).

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #29 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

When did Apple ever have have a dominate share of the mobile OSes? Before Android took off it Symbian was in the lead. Apple has been doing their thing, increasing their profits, while Android is eating the marketshare of the other mobile OSes and the vendors using Android OS taking a little of the profit away from non-Apple players.

True... but I was replying to Slaphappy... he said it!

Apple did have more market share than Android at one time, though...
post #30 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

True... but I was replying to Slaphappy... he said it!

Apple did have more market share than Android at one time, though...

Sure, more than Android, but that's because Android purchased in 2005 had to go back to the drawing board to compete with iOS instead of BB OS. Still, Android has taken everyone else's pie, not Apple's. I might be wrong but Apple is closer now to having the most mobile OS marketshare than its ever been, and they've done it by focusing on profits, not simply going after the most pointless metric a company can have.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #31 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Sure, more than Android, but that's because Android purchased in 2005 had to go back to the drawing board to compete with iOS instead of BB OS. Still, Android has taken everyone else's pie, not Apple's. I might be wrong but Apple is closer now to having the most mobile OS marketshare than its ever been, and they've done it by focusing on profits, not simply going after the most pointless metric a company can have.

I agree... but don't tell that to Slapphappy...
post #32 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Oak View Post

Just wait. In 7 months, the 4 will be free on contract, the base 4S will be $99, and the 5 will be out.

And the 3GS? It becomes Apples low cost off contract solution

Apple is just getting going here

Apples pricing is artificial.
AppleTV have the same hardware as iPhone beside 3G chip + touchscreen. Somehow Apple charges 650 dollar for an iPhone and 99 dollar for the AppleTV.

Apple could sell cheap phones if the wanted, but its more fun making money. Many parts in 3GS is more expensive then the Iphone4, still its cheaper.
post #33 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by shompa View Post

Apples pricing is artificial.
AppleTV have the same hardware as iPhone beside 3G chip + touchscreen. Somehow Apple charges 650 dollar for an iPhone and 99 dollar for the AppleTV.

Apple could sell cheap phones if the wanted, but its more fun making money. Many parts in 3GS is more expensive then the Iphone4, still its cheaper.

Not even close. There is a huge cost difference from from components, licensing, engineering, and manufacturing.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #34 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by shompa View Post

Apples pricing is artificial.
AppleTV have the same hardware as iPhone beside 3G chip + touchscreen. Somehow Apple charges 650 dollar for an iPhone and 99 dollar for the AppleTV.

Apple could sell cheap phones if the wanted, but its more fun making money. Many parts in 3GS is more expensive then the Iphone4, still its cheaper.



You need to learn more about this sort of thing. What you've said is blatantly wrong.

Originally Posted by asdasd

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Originally Posted by asdasd

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post #35 of 69
Coming out of the world of BB and into the Apple ecosystem is as different as night and day. My family is able to communicate with each other easily, calendars match and with a handicapped son, Siri makes life easier for him. We have 4 4s phones and a 3gs, all of us have iPads and have never looked back at those decisions.

When I travel for business, I mainly see iPhones and very few BB's anymore. To me, it's not the phone, which is great, but it's the entire Apple experience. No other vendor offers as much, that is so easy to use, functional for everyday life or work and like Apple says, it just works!

Right now, they offer the very best value for me and my family. Great job Apple.
post #36 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by slapppy View Post

"Though Apple's massive spike in sales helped the company close the gap on Android, Google's mobile platform remains the most popular choice among smartphone owners in the U.S. Nielsen found that 46.3 percent of all domestic smartphone owners have an Android device, compared to the 30 percent share iOS holds."

The cheerleading here doesn't change the fact that this is temporary. A new product will always produce a spike. But if you look closely iOS Smartphone share is losing ground fast. The days of iPhone leading the market as long gone.

Apple will also eventually lose in the tablet market but Apple will always retain the highest loyalty of any brand. Thats what you get when you control both hardware and software
post #37 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

When did Apple ever have have a dominate share of the mobile OSes? Before Android took off it Symbian was in the lead. Apple has been doing their thing, increasing their profits, while Android is eating the marketshare of the other mobile OSes and the vendors using Android OS taking a little of the profit away from non-Apple players.

Samsung and a few other android oems have recorded increasing profits post android release
post #38 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Android's constant missteps is only reason Apple should be able to overtake a free OS uses by dozens of vendors on hundreds of devices, but it has to be substantial and repetitive. Even Windows has 90%+ despite their mishaps because what they do right they do very well, even though Apple is by far the most profitable PC vendor on the planet (and handset vendor).

The US market also has a 55% saturation rate, which is much faster than I would have expected. This is good news for Apple, not for Android. Android will continue to do better in emerging markets with cheaper devices and less saturation. The US with its hundreds of Apple Stores and multiple generations of smartphone users are much more inclined to buy an iPhone than an Android-based phone regardless of what they have before so I agree that the US will show the iPhone uptick in a better light (compared to the world as a whole).

Apple has cheap phones. You can get a 3Gs all the way up to the 4s for free. Apples lion share of profits comes from emerging markets
post #39 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by drobforever View Post

The problem here is that, in 6 months, the growth for iOS smartphone will slow again because of anticipation of iphone 5, while new Android phones will keep coming out every 3 months and maintain the lead.

IMO Apple still needs an additional model, and makes alternate launch cycles every half-year (Sep for traditional launch, Mar for variation launch). E.g. they could make a larger screen 4s model in March, and iPhone 5 in Sep.

Android maintain the lead in what? Profits?
post #40 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Psych_guy View Post

Android maintain the lead in what? Profits?

Marketshare is the only thing in which Android leads. Apple has HALF of the profits of ALL cell phones sold.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
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Originally Posted by asdasd

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