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Apple's education event will focus on textbooks for K-12 students - report

post #1 of 55
Thread Starter 
Apple on Thursday plans to push for broader educational materials on the iPad with a specific focus on students in grades kindergarten through 12, according to a new report.

Just a day ahead of Apple's scheduled event in New York City, Bloomberg reported on Wednesday that Apple Internet software chief Eddy Cue will unveil the K-12 focused software at the scheduled media event. It noted that the textbook industry is a $10 billion-per-year market where Apple plans to use its iPad "to shun costly tomes that weigh down backpacks in favor of less-expensive, interactive digital books that can be updated everywhere via the Web."

Citing anonymous sources familiar with Apple's plans, the report said that Apple plans to "announce a set of tools that make it easier to publish interactive books and other digital educational content." That's similar to one report from earlier this week which claimed that Apple will unveil a tool that is like "Garageband for e-books," though a later report contradicted that and said the event would focus on e-book distribution, not publication tools.

Bloomberg's sources, however, suggest that Apple will indeed unveil new software that aims to make it easier for publishers to make their titles digital and interactive. It said Apple's tools will allow a broad range of authors to publish their content digitally, while large publishers will be able to embed graphics and videos with their textbooks.

"Apple also wants to empower 'self-publishers' to create new kinds of teaching tools, said the people," authors Peter Burrows and Adam Satariano wrote. "Teachers could use it to design materials for that week's lesson. Scientists, historians and other authors could publish professional-looking content without a deal with a publisher."




Earlier reports characterized Apple's plans for Thursday as "publishing industry-oriented" news. Major consumer-related announcements, including new hardware like the anticipated third-generation iPad, are not expected at Thursday's event.

Apple sent out invitations for its event last week, revealing that it had planned an "education announcement in the Big Apple." AppleInsider will have full live coverage of the briefing when it kicks off at 10 a.m. Eastern, 7 a.m. Pacific.
post #2 of 55
K-12 is how old?

Don't say something like "duh, 12, obviously", because it's not obvious and Wikipedia is down.

P.S. Appleinsider should stop reporting until something sticks.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #3 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

K-12 is how old?

Don't say something like "duh, 12, obviously", because it's not obvious and Wikipedia is down.

P.S. Appleinsider should stop reporting until something sticks.

1) In the US kindergarten typically starts at 5yo, with 1st grade being 6yo and so on. So 12, or 12th grade typically means student graduate around 17 to 18yo.

2) Wikipedia is down, expect for one page, but you can also use cached pages in Google to find anything you want in Wikipedia today. "Work smater, not harder." Scrooge McDuck

3) The only way something is sticking is if it's made official by Apple, which then makes this being AppleInsider a pointless site if they don't report on rumours and speculation.

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #4 of 55
If this is true then it follows that Apple must either

1. extend their education discounts to K-12 students and include the iPad
2. Extend the discount but only the one for the iPad
3. Give a discount but only via schools placing bulk orders either to loan to students or resell at cost to the students
4. Drop the starting price of the iPad
5. Keep the base iPad 2 at a reduced cost perhaps only as an education online item (a la the MacBook)

Otherwise schools will remain loathe to invest in the hardware due to costs, especially if the students are going to have to buy the devices themselves.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #5 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

If this is true then it follows that Apple must either

1. extend their education discounts to K-12 students and include the iPad
2. Extend the discount but only the one for the iPad
3. Give a discount but only via schools placing bulk orders either to loan to students or resell at cost to the students
4. Drop the starting price of the iPad
5. Keep the base iPad 2 at a reduced cost perhaps only as an education online item (a la the MacBook)

Why does ANY of this have to happen? People are already buying iPads on their own. They'll just buy MORE on their own if Apple revolutionizes school.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #6 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

If this is true then it follows that Apple must either

Otherwise schools will remain loathe to invest in the hardware due to costs, especially if the students are going to have to buy the devices themselves.

The cost of paper books needs to be factored in against the cost of iPads.

Sounds like a fine idea, unless the schools still cannot afford to provide physical ed. and the arts.
post #7 of 55
I hoping they still have something for the college level people like myself. I'm halfway done and this book industry is killing us with their ridiculous prices.
post #8 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

K-12 is how old?

K-12 isn't a single grade/age. It is a range, Kindergarden through 12th grade. Our school classes are usually organized as kindergarden, 1st grade, 2nd grade, 3rd grade, etc all the way up to 12th grade. Most students take each grade once over the course of a year (unless they repeat the same grade again because they fail or the parents decide they are not ready to move on, or in rare cases of gifted students they may finish a grade early and move on quickly).

Kindergarden through 5th or 6th grade is usually called grade shcool. 6th or 7th through 8th is called middle school or junior high, and 9th through 12th grade is high school. After graduating from high school students are then eligible to go on to junior college or college.

So it sounds like they are saying this is more geared toward grade/middle/high school where the schools typically give a student a book for each of their courses and the student then returns the book at the end of the class so it can be re-used for the following class. Fines are collected from students that damage the books more than regular wear and tear. In this case a school could theoretically give each student an ipad with whatever books they need on it, and then collect the ipad at the end of the year. If you damage the ipad you have to pay for the damages. Or maybe the students have to supply their own ipads, but they school can loan out so many copies of each textbook in e-book form each year, and then take them back at the end of the year. No more wear and tear on the books, and it's much simpler to upgrade an e-book to a new edition when it's released instead of buying all new textbooks (assuming the publishers will just release free or discounted updates instead of charging for a whole new book).

It sounds like they are avoiding the college textbook situation at this time where most students are forced to buy their own books. Many students buy used books, or sell their used books after they complete the course. This may be a more difficult market to get into because how do you sell a e-book to someone else?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zuriel View Post

I hoping they still have something for the college level people like myself. I'm halfway done and this book industry is killing us with their ridiculous prices.

Here's a few hints I learned as I went through college. Buy used if at all possible, even if it is an older version it might be close enough to the same to get by, you might just have to photocopy or borrow a classmates newer version if the questions/problems assigned as homework are different. Sell your old books after the class if over if you don't think you will need them again for other courses/later on in your career. Even then you may be better off selling them and just buying a new copy later on if you need it for your job, you will most likely have more disposable income at that time and can afford it. Don't buy books until after you have started taking a course and find out you will really need it. I had some courses that said I needed books that we only ended up using for a chapter or two, I was able to just borrow/photocopy other's books in order to get through those chapters.

Hope that helps.
post #9 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by kent909 View Post

The cost of paper books needs to be factored in against the cost of iPads.

Sounds like a fine idea, unless the schools still cannot afford to provide physical ed. and the arts.

There are also questions of how often are the school textbooks redone? I know when I was in middle school, they used the same history books for about 5 years running. I'm sure the math to figure out if it will be a better value to do the iPad way instead of physical books will be something like

[Cost of iPad + cost of all books + replacement units (10-30% yearly?)] / lifespan of physical books

This does leave several questions tho, including how much of a discount will happen for the digital books vs physical? I'm also curious about if the price is higher than physical books, but the schools do it anyway, where will the money come from. I definitely agree it would be bad to cut programs like art and music from schools. My wife actually said no to one of the schools we looked at for our daughter when she started kindergarten in the 2010-11 school year b/c they had just shrunk their art and music departments into a single Humanities class, which is likely just a step closer to removed entirely.
post #10 of 55
I went to Grinnell College, where Steve Jobs was a trustee for a few years in the early '80's. The alumni magazine recently published some anecdotes about Jobs's activities there. Apparently he joined the library committee and told everyone, "Don't waste your money on a new library. Books are going to be obsolete." Sounds like he was 30-40 years early on that one!

(He was also on the finance committee, where he advocated for investing the college's endowment in gold. Fortunately this was overruled by the committee chairman, Warren Buffet.)
post #11 of 55
Although this is being called an "education" event, if Apple releases publishing tools that make self-publishing a reality, that will be a major disruption to the publishing industry at large.
post #12 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSquirrel View Post

There are also questions of how often are the school textbooks redone? I know when I was in middle school, they used the same history books for about 5 years running. I'm sure the math to figure out if it will be a better value to do the iPad way instead of physical books will be something like

[Cost of iPad + cost of all books + replacement units (10-30% yearly?)] / lifespan of physical books

This does leave several questions tho, including how much of a discount will happen for the digital books vs physical? I'm also curious about if the price is higher than physical books, but the schools do it anyway, where will the money come from. I definitely agree it would be bad to cut programs like art and music from schools. My wife actually said no to one of the schools we looked at for our daughter when she started kindergarten in the 2010-11 school year b/c they had just shrunk their art and music departments into a single Humanities class, which is likely just a step closer to removed entirely.

I'm coming from a Canadian perspective, but out here there is a "digital push" and they've been buying crappy netbooks for classes anyway. So previous computer/digital product purchasing should be factored in (they also bought a ton of flip cameras for the students to use in various art/tech classes)

Also where we're from they are sort of expanding art/music (though they've lumped dance, music, art, and drama into one "Arts Ed" curriculum) - Perhaps oddly this seems to be where the greatest use of digital media is occurring, though I can see an interactive Shakespeare Text for a grade 12 that includes cilps of Olivier doing Hamlet, then Brannaugh (sp?) as well, etc., and its exciting to think about
post #13 of 55
My daughter is a freshman at a high school in the Seattle area.

Half of her classes use reading materials that are online.

Come to think of it, I wonder if all kids have internet access at home. There is accessibility at school, though.
post #14 of 55
Let me guess: iBooks will remain iOS only.
post #15 of 55
Currently, certain major states with right-wing leanings have undue influence on the content of textbooks (e.g., the treatment of evolution) because it costs too much to create a special print edition for them and publishers are unwilling to give up that part of the market. As a result, students everywhere are forced to use inferior textbooks. With the transition of textbooks to the iPad, however, it becomes feasible to create more than one edition: a doctrinaire edition for communities that demand that (if the publishers are willing to make that compromise for the money) and an uncensored edition for everyone else. The potential benefits to the educational system are huge.
post #16 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianus View Post

Let me guess: iBooks will remain iOS only.

Ultimately, that is the problem. While the Apple platforms are good. They aren't good enough for everyone.
post #17 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by nw3227 View Post

Currently, certain major states with right-wing leanings have undue influence on the content of textbooks (e.g., the treatment of evolution) because it costs too much to create a special print edition for them and publishers are unwilling to give up that part of the market. As a result, students everywhere are forced to use inferior textbooks. With the transition of textbooks to the iPad, however, it becomes feasible to create more than one edition: a doctrinaire edition for communities that demand that (if the publishers are willing to make that compromise for the money) and an uncensored edition for everyone else. The potential benefits to the educational system are huge.

Yes, not dumbing the nation down to Texas's level is extremely important
post #18 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by kent909 View Post

The cost of paper books needs to be factored in against the cost of iPads.

Sounds like a fine idea, unless the schools still cannot afford to provide physical ed. and the arts.

To me the sticking point will be 'ubiquity'.
Unless you can find a way for EVERY student in a class or school to have access to an iPad, you've developed a 2-tier system and have economized on nothing. That kind of set-up gets you a cute 'pilot program', but nothing more.
To work, Apple has to see to it that every student has access to an inexpensive or subsidized device.

Perhaps they release a dirt cheap 8 GB iPad 2 along with the iPad 3?
It wouldn't cut into serious sales, and would be perfectly adequate for the purpose.
post #19 of 55
$199 ipad 2 once the 3 comes out. even the ipad 2 is overkill for text books

at the same time they can release software to enable note taking and homework for the ipad so that instead of parents spending ridiculous amounts of money on notebooks, paper, and pens they will just buy the ipad
post #20 of 55
Really looking forward to that. Cheaper university textbook on an iPad would really be very very awesome.
post #21 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

$199 ipad 2 once the 3 comes out. even the ipad 2 is overkill for text books

That's insane. $399.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #22 of 55
The iPad price isn't the problem, the problem is the books price. For this to really succeed Apple has to find a way to reduce the Textbook price.
Easy to use tool will definitely help by making the authors publish directly to the App store and eliminate the Publishers.

I hope this will not be another US only.
English is not my native language so feel free to correct me.
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English is not my native language so feel free to correct me.
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post #23 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

That's insane. $399.

the BoM at launch was $225 and its probably down to well under $200 now
post #24 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

the BoM at launch was $225 and its probably down to well under $200 now

Lowering it to the price of the Kindle Fire would be legitimizing it as a competitor. It's not. Apple has no reason to do that.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #25 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iceltic View Post

The iPad price isn't the problem, the problem is the books price. For this to really succeed Apple has to find a way to reduce the Textbook price.
Easy to use tool will definitely help by making the authors publish directly to the App store and eliminate the Publishers.

I hope this will not be another US only.

There is whole sale copying of school textbooks happening. Publishers could subsidize iPads against against a lower cost textbook subscription and make much more than they do now imo.
post #26 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSquirrel View Post

Yes, not dumbing the nation down to Texas's level is extremely important

So, only presenting one option in either case (especially when the science is simply a theory and the details debated among scientists) is better? :roll eyes:

Disclaimer: I'm a Creationist, but I believe an issue such as this is better handled with a fair and open discussion--since neither option can be proven absolutely. (i.e. seen in action), and the implications of either theory are too important just to cram one view down someone's throat. Both camps should give a fair presentation of both sides of the debate and explain WHY they disagree with the opposing viewpoint. (discussing the counter-arguments is also a good idea---you know, discussion)
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post #27 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Lowering it to the price of the Kindle Fire would be legitimizing it as a competitor. It's not. Apple has no reason to do that.

it would be as bad as a free on contract 3gs that competes with free android phones wouldn't it

in most product categories apple has a cheapo version for the low end of the market
post #28 of 55
Hope this helps to bring down the cost of textbooks. Also hope it's not a US only thing.

Really like the idea of making it easier to self publish and anything that helps push out Adobe and their rip-off pricing is very welcome.

I can see the day when we have a national curriculum app which has all the required textbooks included so you don't have to go and buy them all separately. The iPad really does have so much potential to change things like no computer before it.
post #29 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

If this is true then it follows that Apple must either

1. extend their education discounts to K-12 students and include the iPad
2. Extend the discount but only the one for the iPad
3. Give a discount but only via schools placing bulk orders either to loan to students or resell at cost to the students
4. Drop the starting price of the iPad
5. Keep the base iPad 2 at a reduced cost perhaps only as an education online item (a la the MacBook)

Just had a meeting with the sometimes completely clueless PC IT head of our school district who thinks that iPads are no good because they are not laptops (duh!). But I'll add to your list.

6. No real way to massively deploy iPads (like the way you can set up the Mac OS exactly the way that you want it, make an image of it, and push it over the network to other Macs). Buy 100 iPads for your school district = a complete pain in the ass setting everything up before distributing them. If this could be done once and pushed out things would be incrementally easier.
7. No legal way to monitor/control what users are doing with the iPads (key requirement in an educational setting).

iPads would be a little easier to justify to brain-dead IT/PC guys if Apple addressed 6 and 7.
post #30 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanl View Post

Ultimately, that is the problem. While the Apple platforms are good. They aren't good enough for everyone.

steve's biggest marketing pitch is to tell how good a people is and this individual also uses mac products. i don't get it that it is so simple idea that no many get it. sorry if i am saying this harsh: apple never tried to please everyone, but successful ones.
post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by kohelet View Post

So, only presenting one option in either case (especially when the science is simply a theory and the details debated among scientists) is better? :roll eyes:

Disclaimer: I'm a Creationist, but I believe an issue such as this is better handled with a fair and open discussion--since neither option can be proven absolutely. (i.e. seen in action), and the implications of either theory are too important just to cram one view down someone's throat. Both camps should give a fair presentation of both sides of the debate and explain WHY they disagree with the opposing viewpoint. (discussing the counter-arguments is also a good idea---you know, discussion)

The Texas board did not have a fair and even discussion. They had enough ID folk on the committee to win all votes. It wasn't only Intelligent Design, they also made wholesale changes to actual history in the textbooks. The panel involved was not made up of scientists or scholars, you know, people who actually have knowledge and experience of the topics at hand. THAT is what I meant by dumbing things down to Texas's level. I mean, they cut Thomas Jefferson out of history.
post #32 of 55
Concentrating on K-12 makes no sense to me (and why I don't buy the Bloomberg report).

Getting books approved for K-12 is a difficult process involving state BofEs and sometimes involves state legislatures. University books, however, are at the discretion of the individual professors and schools - especially in the case of private universities. Further, professors are often authors themselves, or want to be, and would be perfect candidates for self-publishing solutions.

If Apple really is going after K-12 then I think their efforts will be of little consequence.

But then again ... we'll see (and learn more tomorrow).
post #33 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSquirrel View Post

The Texas board did not have a fair and even discussion. They had enough ID folk on the committee to win all votes. It wasn't only Intelligent Design, they also made wholesale changes to actual history in the textbooks. The panel involved was not made up of scientists or scholars, you know, people who actually have knowledge and experience of the topics at hand. THAT is what I meant by dumbing things down to Texas's level. I mean, they cut Thomas Jefferson out of history.

That I can agree with you on. You can't cut out Jefferson--even if you don't like everything he has to say. The man was a founder of the country and a president!
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post #34 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TalkingNewMedia View Post

Concentrating on K-12 makes no sense to me (and why I don't buy the Bloomberg report).

Getting books approved for K-12 is a difficult process involving state BofEs and sometimes involves state legislatures. University books, however, are at the discretion of the individual professors and schools - especially in the case of private universities. Further, professors are often authors themselves, or want to be, and would be perfect candidates for self-publishing solutions.

If Apple really is going after K-12 then I think their efforts will be of little consequence.

But then again ... we'll see (and learn more tomorrow).

Imagine if as part of the announcement, Apple said they were focusing on their home state first and subsidized a lower price iPad for every K-12 school in California and paid for the first year's worth of textbooks. That could easily cost that 3B or so that Apple had earmarked for strategic investment. Investing in our nation's future by helping to educate kids could be an interesting take on things.

I don't think this will happen, but it's certainly fun to think about
post #35 of 55
for professors, just publishing their books in current format is not enough anymore. digital device can provide better interactive communication than traditional paper medium. further paper based textbook can be easily printer-copied and piracy is bad. so it would make sense that textbook publishers want to move away from paper. in this effort, lots of ppl are needed to publish a textbook, so more ppl would be hired as well. of course, ppl in traditional paper printing business will be hurt and thus shrink, but it will not disappear.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TalkingNewMedia View Post

Concentrating on K-12 makes no sense to me (and why I don't buy the Bloomberg report).

Getting books approved for K-12 is a difficult process involving state BofEs and sometimes involves state legislatures. University books, however, are at the discretion of the individual professors and schools - especially in the case of private universities. Further, professors are often authors themselves, or want to be, and would be perfect candidates for self-publishing solutions.

If Apple really is going after K-12 then I think their efforts will be of little consequence.

But then again ... we'll see (and learn more tomorrow).
post #36 of 55
The weight issue is wonderful for kids but I can't even begin to count the number of times I'd get to a class with the wrong books or get home with the wrong ones. I had a sort of mental fog when I was in the first few years at Grammar School, The Royal Liberty, in Essex UK. Probably as I had a 90 minute commute in both directions and a long walk to and from bloody stations. Oh how wonderful iPad technology would have been for me back then! All data available from anywhere as long as I had had my iPad. All those detentions I'd have avoided! Lucky kids today.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) In the US kindergarten typically starts at 5yo, with 1st grade being 6yo and so on. So 12, or 12th grade typically means student graduate around 17 to 18yo.

2) Wikipedia is down, expect for one page, but you can also use cached pages in Google to find anything you want in Wikipedia today. "Work smater, not harder." Scrooge McDuck

3) The only way something is sticking is if it's made official by Apple, which then makes this being AppleInsider a pointless site if they don't report on rumours and speculation.

Took me a while to figure the nomenclature out when I first came to the States to live, I kept hearing this 'k12' mentioned and I knew what k9 was, the American Police Dog units. So I was really confused till enlightened.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #38 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beerstalker View Post

So it sounds like they are saying this is more geared toward grade/middle/high school where the schools typically give a student a book for each of their courses and the student then returns the book at the end of the class so it can be re-used for the following class. Fines are collected from students that damage the books more than regular wear and tear. In this case a school could theoretically give each student an ipad with whatever books they need on it, and then collect the ipad at the end of the year. If you damage the ipad you have to pay for the damages. Or maybe the students have to supply their own ipads, but they school can loan out so many copies of each textbook in e-book form each year, and then take them back at the end of the year. No more wear and tear on the books, and it's much simpler to upgrade an e-book to a new edition when it's released instead of buying all new textbooks (assuming the publishers will just release free or discounted updates instead of charging for a whole new book).

It sounds like they are avoiding the college textbook situation at this time where most students are forced to buy their own books. Many students buy used books, or sell their used books after they complete the course. This may be a more difficult market to get into because how do you sell a e-book to someone else?

Those are good points. A lot of the speculation around this announcement has focused on the college textbook market, with a lot of people wondering how Apple could possibly convince the publishers to relinquish their hefty profits in a way that would make electronic editions even desirable, much less preferable.

But as you say, K-12 is a whole different animal. Given the re-occurring costs to schools districts to acquire, store, provide and replace a huge inventory of textbooks, it's much easier to imagine a way for Apple to provide a service that works for all participants. The textbook publishers could charge less and still make their money, since they could realize cost savings over conventional print runs.

But more importantly they could charge the same and the school districts could still save money, since they would be unburdened of the shipping, storage and replacement costs of traditional books. Not to mention access to editorial updates, built in interactivity, peer to peer collaboration, and being able to uniformly address the student population via a single hardware/software channel (scheduling, grades, notes to parents, school news, private notes from teachers, breaking news, etc).

Sure, there's a fairly hefty buy-in cost for the hardware, but if Apple can get enough publishers on board there are huge savings and benefits on the backend, so the economics might actually make sense for more than just a handful of wealthy school districts intent on impressing parents with their forward vision. In other words, Apple may intend to mainstream electronic textbooks via the iPad in much the same way they've mainstreamed other prior existing but muddled technologies.
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post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by kohelet View Post

So, only presenting one option in either case (especially when the science is simply a theory and the details debated among scientists) is better? :roll eyes:

Disclaimer: I'm a Creationist, but I believe an issue such as this is better handled with a fair and open discussion--since neither option can be proven absolutely. (i.e. seen in action), and the implications of either theory are too important just to cram one view down someone's throat. Both camps should give a fair presentation of both sides of the debate and explain WHY they disagree with the opposing viewpoint. (discussing the counter-arguments is also a good idea---you know, discussion)

Best laugh I've had all day.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #40 of 55
I could easily see a new bare bones model of the ipad being released just for schools at a much lower price. Knock it down to 8Gb, get rid of the camera (don't want kids taking naughty pictures with the schools property) get rid of bluetooth, keep the current res screen, etc. Create a slightly different version of iOS that lets the school IT department easily manage/image multiple iPads at the same time. Only allow the IT department to install apps/books.

This really could work well, and be a cost savings for the schools. As well as make the textbook publishers more money. Maybe instead of them selling the books to the schools once every 5-10 years instead now they rent the books to the schools for so much money per copy, per year. They can then make small updates to the books each year, etc. and have a constant revenue stream instead of one that can swing wildly as different schools replace/don't replace their books each year.

I really think this is where Apple should be concentrating if they aren't, because others are. My wife is a high school guidance counselor and they are currently in discussions with a few companies to do very similar things with simple android based tablets like the kindle fire.
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