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Apple to reinvent the textbook with interactive iBooks 2 for iPad

post #1 of 118
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Suggesting that physical textbooks are no longer the ideal learning tool, Apple on Thursday proposed a new platform and method of digital education: iBooks 2 for iPad.

Speaking to the press at New York's Guggenheim Museum, Apple's senior vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing, Phil Schiller, said current textbooks are not very portable, they're not durable, and they're not interactive. He believes the iPad stacks up better, particularly with the new iBooks 2.

"Education is deep in Apples DNA and iPad may be our most exciting education product yet. With 1.5 million iPads already in use in education institutions, including over 1,000 one-to-one deployments, iPad is rapidly being adopted by schools across the US and around the world," Schiller said."Now with iBooks 2 for iPad, students have a more dynamic, engaging and truly interactive way to read and learn, using the device they already love."

Demonstrating iBooks 2 on Thursday, Apple's Roger Rosner showed off how iBooks 2 allows texbooks to start off with intro movies. He also quickly went across thumbnails for pages, and could skip across chapters.

Touting the new textbooks as "gorgeous," Rosner argued that "no printed book can compete with this." He demonstrated the ability to pinch into photos, and showcased 3D models of biological structures that can be rotated and manipulated in real-time -- all of this interaction happens within a digital textbook in iBooks 2.

Titles were shown off in both portrait and landscape mode. When switching to portrait, the digital textbook takes on a simpler look, with smaller pictures on the side and reading the more dominant task.



Rosner's demonstration utilized a number of multi-touch gestures to interact with the book, like pinch the page to access the table of contents. He also used features like tapping a word to get a definition, or to access a glossary.

Also demonstrated was a new gallery view. Users can swipe to browse the images in a gallery, and tap the screen to make the image go fullscreen.

iBooks 2 also offers chapter summaries, and multiple choice tests with questions and answers. Students are offered immediate feedback on their answers, and teachers are given options for layouts and question types.

Additionally, the new platform simplifies note taking, allowing students to swipe over text to highlight. Tapping highlighted text allows students to change the color, while notes can be added to the margin by tapping the note icon.



New textbooks can be purchased from the iBookstore, where screenshots of titles are also available. Free samples remain available, and there's an option for one-tap purchasing. Titles can be re-downloaded as needed.

iBooks 2 remains a free application, and the new update is available on the App Store today.



Apples's added push into the education, with a specific focus on student engagement, comes at a time when US scholars are lagging far behind their international peers. US students rank 17th in reading, 21st in math and 23rd in science, Schiller said. And those students who are lucky enough to work hard and graduate may still not be best positioned to compete in the global market, he added.

For their part, teachers interviewed ahead of Thursdays event said they've long battled low levels of engagement and witnessing students struggle with basic reading and writing skills while generally lacking interested in subjects taught in the classroom.



Meanwhile, class sizes have swelled to excess of 40 students each inside institutions whose infrastructure is falling into disrepair and which lack all the modern technology -- and even all of the text books -- they need.

While Apple acknowledge that "no one person or company can try to fix" all of the education shortcomings plaguing the US, the company feels best positioned to help.

Already, 1.5 million iPads are in use as part of US educational programs and the App Store already boasts more than 20,000 education and learning applications for the iPad -- a number which is sure to swell given the Cupertino-based company's latest initiative.



Features of iBooks highlighted by Apple are:
Download many of your favorite books from the included iBookstore
In addition to standard text, the iBookstore also offers books that are fully illustrated, and enhanced with audio, video, and animation
Experience gorgeous fullscreen Multi-Touch textbooks designed for iPad. These textbooks are filled with interactive features, diagrams, photos, videos, and more
Read a free sample of any book on the iBookstore before making it a part of your collection
Reorder your books on your bookshelf or browse them in a list sorted by title, author, or category
Organize your books and PDFs into personal Collections. Swipe left or right to jump between Collections
Easily adjust your screen brightness to find the perfect lighting for any environment
Change the font size and pick from six included type faces to make your books more comfortable to read
Find a word, character, or phrase anywhere in your book with the built-in search feature
Keep your bookmarks, notes, and your current page wirelessly in sync between iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch with the automatic bookmark syncing feature
Quickly find a specific page using the page navigator at the bottom of every page
Read your books on white or sepia colored pages
Switch to full screen to remove all distractions, or read in white-on-black with the nighttime mode
Choose left or fully justified text layout from Settings
Highlight your favorite passages and add notes with the built-in bookmarking features
Add books in the industry-standard ePub electronic book format to iTunes and sync them to iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch
Add PDF documents to iBooks from Mail, or add them to iTunes and sync them to iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch
Print PDF documents and notes you've written in iBooks using AirPrint
Use iBooks with the amazing accessibility features in iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch such as speaking the words on a given page
post #2 of 118
I wonder what they will add in iBooks 2?

As an engineer - what I would have liked to have would be an embedded scientific graphing calculator, so I could work through the examples the book gave, on my own. This would come in handy not only in technical books (Physics, Statics, Dynamics, Differential Equations, Calculus, Real/Imaginary and Matrix mathematics), but also for quick sanity checks for classes like Economics.

Being able to quickly open a window and plug in the formulas and run a couple examples would have been a great learning tool.

I'm excited to see what Apple is adding to the mix.
post #3 of 118
Quote:
One of the largest was student engagement, and the fact that many students aren't interested in subjects taught in the classroom.

When I look back at my education, I can't clearly remember a single teaching supplement that I used, but I can remember the teachers that chose to make a difference.

iBooks 2 is not going to change that.

I wasn't a big fan of English class, but one of my favorites classes overall was 12th Grade English because of the teacher. I don't think giving me an iPad in the other X number of English classes I took would have changed my opinion.

I wish Apple the best on this endeavor, but I'm a little skeptical.
post #4 of 118
I love what we can do with technology - but 2 things these new beautiful ENTERTAINING books can not do compared to print.

The Printed form can not BE ALTERED as in present a new point of view of history in education. (I work in the legal field and ROM is still very importatnt)

and 2 - when one day (if) we lose power in society or become poor to the point where we can not access electricty - the printed form is all we will have left.

I am not saying this for doomsday reasons - or to say that only the rich will prosper - its just that everything these days are made with entertainment in mind rather then the educational experience needed that will exercise your mind from the printed text.

of course this will appeal to the youth - and thats how it starts.

Love apple - hate that everything has to be ENTERTAINMENT-ED (if that's a word) just to get someone to read.
post #5 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

I wonder what they will add in iBooks 2?

As an engineer - what I would have liked to have would be an embedded scientific graphing calculator, so I could work through the examples the book gave, on my own. This would come in handy not only in technical books (Physics, Statics, Dynamics, Differential Equations, Calculus, Real/Imaginary and Matrix mathematics), but also for quick sanity checks for classes like Economics.

Being able to quickly open a window and plug in the formulas and run a couple examples would have been a great learning tool.

I'm excited to see what Apple is adding to the mix.

It will be interesting to see if CourseSmart tries to compete with this or lets their iPad/iPhone app stagnate. The only benefit they might have is lower prices since you are only "borrowing" the book for the semester.
post #6 of 118
"Many students aren't interested in subjects taught in the classroom." Don't see how technology is going to change that. It may facilitate those who participate in the system, but not those who think outside of the box. Would Steve Jobs have participated? Remember, he quit college and trusted his own mind, vision.
post #7 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

I wonder what they will add in iBooks 2?

As an engineer - what I would have liked to have would be an embedded scientific graphing calculator, so I could work through the examples the book gave, on my own. This would come in handy not only in technical books (Physics, Statics, Dynamics, Differential Equations, Calculus, Real/Imaginary and Matrix mathematics), but also for quick sanity checks for classes like Economics.

Being able to quickly open a window and plug in the formulas and run a couple examples would have been a great learning tool.

I'm excited to see what Apple is adding to the mix.

That's an interesting thought. Those graphics calculators are expensive and it would be a shame if students had to jump between two apps to do some equations from a math textbook and calc app, but I have a feeling Apple won't give access to its iOS calc app in the SDK so I think they will have to create their own. I hope I'm wrong.


Quote:
Originally Posted by holmstockd View Post

I love what we can do with technology - but 2 things these new beautiful ENTERTAINING books can not do compared to print.

[...]

I am not saying this for doomsday reasons - or to say that only the rich will prosper - its just that everything these days are made with entertainment in mind rather then the educational experience needed that will exercise your mind from the printed text.

[...]

Love apple - hate that everything has to be ENTERTAINMENT-ED (if that's a word) just to get someone to read.

Yes, we should make learning more boring for students, not less¡

BTW, making a book more interactive doesn't necessarily make it more entertaining but it does add a new way to engage the student that could lead to a much faster and more thorough understanding of the content in ways printed material never could

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post #8 of 118
Does iBooks 2 replace the current iBooks? Or is it in addition?

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post #9 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Oak View Post

Does iBooks 2 replace the current iBooks? Or is it in addition?

Replace. It's a point update.
post #10 of 118
couple of questions for you guys

(1) I was unable to download iBooks 2 to my mac. Is it only available for iOS devices and not Macs? or will it launch later internationally (Im in the UK)

(2) Is it only a reader, or is it meant to provide the tools for content providers. I've got a gorgeous project that I finished 18 months back, but realised I couldn't monetize a pdf project--the ePub version is a sow's ear by comparisonso it's languished.
post #11 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeSmoke View Post

"Many students aren't interested in subjects taught in the classroom." Don't see how technology is going to change that. It may facilitate those who participate in the system, but not those who think outside of the box. Would Steve Jobs have participated? Remember, he quit college and trusted his own mind, vision.

Well, there's a difference between an "outside the box" thinker like Steve Jobs who has the skill and motivation to learn on their own and a spoiled or un-parented high school kid who doesn't care to participate in school other than to not get kicked/flunk out. It's a culture problem, which technology won't solve but something that makes it easier to learn with less effort would probably make a difference for all kids, even the ones who aren't trying that hard.
post #12 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadow415 View Post

When I look back at my education, I can't clearly remember a single teaching supplement that I used, but I can remember the teachers that chose to make a difference.

iBooks 2 is not going to change that.

You're completely missing the point. It's not meant to change that. It's meant to supplement that.

The teachers that choose to make a difference will continue to stand out, obviously. It's the ones that do mediocre work that will now be supplemented by a great method by which the student can learn. You'll remember the iPad in those classes and the teachers in the other classes. Either way, you'll retain the CORRECT information. Either the raw data from the iPads or the passion given to you by the teachers who love their job.

iBooks 2 will also be a way for the teachers who can make a difference but are restricted by the physical limitations of existing material TO make said difference. Just wait and see.
post #13 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcsegenmd View Post

couple of questions for you guys

(1) I was unable to download iBooks 2 to my mac. Is it only available for iOS devices and not Macs? or will it launch later internationally (Im in the UK)

(2) Is it only a reader, or is it meant to provide the tools for content providers. I've got a gorgeous project that I finished 18 months back, but realised I couldn't monetize a pdf project--the ePub version is a sow's ear by comparison––so it's languished.

(1) I downloaded and installed the new 2.0 iBooks app on my Mac. I don't know what the problem is with your system; try again tomorrow. If it persists, take your Mac to a Genius Bar at an Apple Retail Store.

(2) It's just a reader. The authoring tools will be separate.
post #14 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

institutions whose infrastructure is falling into disappear...



I hate when things fall into disappear!
post #15 of 118
iBooks author
post #16 of 118
Underwhelmed. First time I've seen Apple announce something that is largely irrelevant. And with iBooks Author, now anyone can make a textbook with crappy content, and claim it is a "published textbook." I can see whole school districts in Kansas making science textbooks that omit evolution.

Nothing here, move along. Except of course, tho looks like Apple is returning to the Newton Model of business.
post #17 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

You're completely missing the point. It's not meant to change that. It's meant to supplement that.

The teachers that choose to make a difference will continue to stand out, obviously. It's the ones that do mediocre work that will now be supplemented by a great method by which the student can learn. You'll remember the iPad in those classes and the teachers in the other classes. Either way, you'll retain the CORRECT information. Either the raw data from the iPads or the passion given to you by the teachers who love their job.

iBooks 2 will also be a way for the teachers who can make a difference but are restricted by the physical limitations of existing material TO make said difference. Just wait and see.

I think that's exactly right. An excellent teacher could do a better job than even the best designed interactive book. Also, a very motivated and smart student could learn everything they need from a traditional paper book. The new interactive book will make it easier, more fun, and faster to learn information, helping students that aren't as interested and not trying as hard. The job of a teacher and book is to make it as clear and easy as possible for students to understand difficult concepts (at least for technical subjects like math, biology, chemistry, etc).
post #18 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

Underwhelmed largely irrelevant. Nothing here, move along.

Come off it.
post #19 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

Underwhelmed. First time I've seen Apple announce something that is largely irrelevant. And with iBooks Author, now anyone can make a textbook with crappy content, and claim it is a "published textbook." I can see whole school districts in Kansas making science textbooks that omit evolution.

Nothing here, move along. Except of course, tho looks like Apple is returning to the Newton Model of business.

:scratching head:
post #20 of 118
I would have absolutely loved this in school. I remember paying $140.00 for a new chemistry book, and then when I went to the bookstore at the end of the semester to get my cash back, I found out they were moving to a new version. If they can get all of the major publishers to start using ibooks and can hold that $15.00 price point that I have read, it will be an amazing service. The ipad would pay for itself.

The thing is, it works out well for the publisher too. The high price of books is based largely on the fact that students sell them at the end of the semester and the publisher gets nothing from secondary sales. They would now get cash on all textbook sales and it would at least limit sharing since it would be linked to an itunes account.

The other thing this would do would get even more ipads in the amount of students. Basically, it is a win for everyone.
post #21 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

Underwhelmed. First time I've seen Apple announce something that is largely irrelevant. And with iBooks Author, now anyone can make a textbook with crappy content, and claim it is a "published textbook." I can see whole school districts in Kansas making science textbooks that omit evolution.

Nothing here, move along. Except of course, tho looks like Apple is returning to the Newton Model of business.

...then you are the one who needs to move on. With engagement a constant challenge in today's classrooms, with teachers struggling to get needed resources, this is huge for them. The relevancy is your problem, not Apple's. And what makes you think your particularly myopic vision of what this means in any way reflects reality? Your whole post post smacks of jaded cynical elitism. So in your line of thinking making clean water avalable for everyone is just going to encourage those who piss on the corner to just piss more? Get. Over. Yourself.
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post #22 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baka-Dubbs View Post

I would have absolutely loved this in school. I remember paying $140.00 for a new chemistry book, and then when I went to the bookstore at the end of the semester to get my cash back, I found out they were moving to a new version. If they can get all of the major publishers to start using ibooks and can hold that $15.00 price point that I have read, it will be an amazing service. The ipad would pay for itself.

The thing is, it works out well for the publisher too. The high price of books is based largely on the fact that students sell them at the end of the semester and the publisher gets nothing from secondary sales. They would now get cash on all textbook sales and it would at least limit sharing since it would be linked to an itunes account.

The other thing this would do would get even more ipads in the amount of students. Basically, it is a win for everyone.

This looks like it hurts printers and distributors/resellers most. I expect the publishers to make even more money but without all the additional cost of putting out a new printed book every year or two.

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post #23 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

Underwhelmed. First time I've seen Apple announce something that is largely irrelevant. And with iBooks Author, now anyone can make a textbook with crappy content, and claim it is a "published textbook." I can see whole school districts in Kansas making science textbooks that omit evolution.

Nothing here, move along. Except of course, tho looks like Apple is returning to the Newton Model of business.

We've only seen some tools, you know there is an ecosystem change coming also with Apple's entry. And that's the hard part that Apple has done well in other industries more than once.
post #24 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

Underwhelmed. First time I've seen Apple announce something that is largely irrelevant. And with iBooks Author, now anyone can make a textbook with crappy content, and claim it is a "published textbook." I can see whole school districts in Kansas making science textbooks that omit evolution. ...

Indeed. I see major problems with content ahead.

Apple will no doubt start with the premise that they won't censor or edit content, but what if I want to make a sex education book available in the USA with "interactive elements?" what if I want to publish a Women's rights textbook in iBooks and make it available in United Arab Emirates?

Are people going to be allowed to publish anything at all and call it a textbook? They should be, but I don't see it happening. The US is one of the most anal, religious countries on earth. There are literally tons of topics (besides the obvious), that would be intolerable to that audience.

Who's going to check the facts on all this stuff?
post #25 of 118
The real benefit that computers bring to knowledge is the ability to put all knowledge in one place and link it together. Such as Wikipedia does. In that sense separate/individual textbooks are anachronistic. But in another sense, when someone young is learning, they still need a self-contained introductory tome on a subject, and textbooks are still relevant for that purpose.

I am disappointed there is no iBooks for Mac. Amazon somehow managed this. Whatever the technical or legal hurdles, they overcame them, and I can now read my Amazon books on both the Mac and iPad.

I also would have liked to hear them mention gifted education. The advantage of an interactive book is that it can (in theory) adjust to the reader, should they want to know more.
post #26 of 118
Phil looks killer. He's like half the size he was!
post #27 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baka-Dubbs View Post

... The high price of books is based largely on the fact that students sell them at the end of the semester and the publisher gets nothing from secondary sales. ...

This is not actually true. Historically, you are putting the cart before the horse here.

The buying back of textbooks arose as a *reaction* to the high prices of the books which came first. There was a least a decade of the publishers raping the students for their money before the buyback thing got started.

The buying back of course books originally started as a separate business by parties who saw an opportunity because the publishers were stealing the students lunch money with their pricing structure. Only then, after about five or six years of that, did the publishers step in and take over the buyback business so that they could make even more money.
post #28 of 118
I think the take away value of this is to note that only Apple can supply the end-to-end toolchain you need to create these kind of books. Amazon released a more capable ebook format recently but Amazon can't do tools like iBooks Creator. Android just doesn't have anything like this and if a school wanted to adopt Android tablets who do they turn to, Google? Samsung? None of these companies appear to be interested in the long-term viability of their products. I don't think any school is going to purchase 100k Samsung Galaxy Tab's. With Apple they get all the tools they need from a single supplier and they know the platform will be supported, they'll be able to get updates, etc. Apple just extended its lead in education and, more importantly, showed a huge amount of commitment to improving education. This presentation was clearly aimed at US educators. Now, if you're a school or university considering using tablets, you'd be utterly insane to consider anything other than the iPad. That's a pretty big deal.
post #29 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by HyteProsector View Post

Phil looks killer. He's like half the size he was!

In before "PHIL HAS CANCER, TOO".
post #30 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by techguy911 View Post

I think that's exactly right. An excellent teacher could do a better job than even the best designed interactive book. Also, a very motivated and smart student could learn everything they need from a traditional paper book. The new interactive book will make it easier, more fun, and faster to learn information, helping students that aren't as interested and not trying as hard. The job of a teacher and book is to make it as clear and easy as possible for students to understand difficult concepts (at least for technical subjects like math, biology, chemistry, etc).

In my personal experience and with my childrens I've found there to be more poor teachers than good ones. Anything that make it easier them to motivate their students is worthwhile. Likewise anything that motivates the average student to learn on their own is also worthwhile. I don't think a traditional book converted to digital will accomplish any of the above.

It will be interesting to see actual iBooks2 and how they differ from traditional boks. If well done the concept may well be a game changer in education.
post #31 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

Underwhelmed. First time I've seen Apple announce something that is largely irrelevant. And with iBooks Author, now anyone can make a textbook with crappy content, and claim it is a "published textbook." I can see whole school districts in Kansas making science textbooks that omit evolution.

They might make them, but good luck getting Apple to sell them.

If my school district were to propose a large capital expenditure to buy iPads which would force them to buy all textbooks from a single vendor, Apple, I would go to the meetings and object.

It would be crazy for any school district to lock themselves into buying only Apple-approved texts. Apple has proven that the software it vends through its online stores is subject to secret and idiosyncratic approval mechanisms.
post #32 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadow415 View Post

When I look back at my education, I can't clearly remember a single teaching supplement that I used, but I can remember the teachers that chose to make a difference.

iBooks 2 is not going to change that.

I wasn't a big fan of English class, but one of my favorites classes overall was 12th Grade English because of the teacher. I don't think giving me an iPad in the other X number of English classes I took would have changed my opinion.

I wish Apple the best on this endeavor, but I'm a little skeptical.

That's it then? Because education depends on something more than the material you're going to dismiss a much-improved piece of material?

This kind of people makes me depressed.

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post #33 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

largely irrelevant

So is your poorly constructed opinion on the matter.

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post #34 of 118
I see the benefit of having a tool like this available in the classroom, whether it's for high school or for college.

I had several great instructors in high school, who did the best that they could with videos to get a point across. In the classes that had projectors, they tried power points. Classes that didn't, used that light box with the magnifier that would project it on a white pull down screen. All in all though the instructors did the best they could with the tools that they had. On more than one occation the TV, VCR or Projector wouldn't work and they had to move on to something else.

With a tool like this, an instructor could quite easily present information in a way that is easier to understand. Chemistry? Heck yes that would have helped me! The ability to actually see an atom as a three dimentional object would have helped me immensely. It was a difficult subject for me because I couldn't (at the time) understand how this flat image of valence shells was supposed to be 3 dimentional. All the static pictures in the book didn't make a whole lot of sense at the time.

Biology? Absolutely too! It would be great to read text as I do now, then look at a supplemental video embeded in the program that lets me see what's actually taking place. I do it now with news, read a story, watch the video. Or while reviewing information on photosynthesis, you see a video of what goes on inside the cell while it's still alive.

Crappy teachers will still be crappy teachers because they lack enthusiasm for what they do. The best teachers I had were enthusiastic, maybe not the smartest people on the planet, but they LOVED what they were doing and it showed through in their class instruction.

I just wish this wasn't targeted towards K-12... I could have used some serious relief in my college classes from the stagnant powerpoint lessons or even the cost of text books alone.
post #35 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

Underwhelmed. First time I've seen Apple announce something that is largely irrelevant. And with iBooks Author, now anyone can make a textbook with crappy content, and claim it is a "published textbook." I can see whole school districts in Kansas making science textbooks that omit evolution.

Nothing here, move along. Except of course, tho looks like Apple is returning to the Newton Model of business.

And thats not a good thing? Science can be learned/executed without the presuppositions brought by evolution and millions of years. Why not let the students see actual observable science in action and let them make the logical decision on their own? Id rather my kids use their minds and their own discernment rather than be spoon fed one theology/ideology or another.

Observability, testability, repeatability, and falsifiability are the hallmarks of the scientific method. I say leave evolution/millions of years out of the books and let kids figure it out on their own... in the end it would make them better problem solvers - force them to figure out what is true instead of just telling them what is true.

W. Pauli, winner of the Nobel prize in physics, said that all scientific methods fail when questions of origin are involved.


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W. Pauli, winner of the Nobel prize in physics, said that all scientific methods fail when questions of origin are involved.


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post #36 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by I am a Zither Zather Zuzz View Post

They might make them, but good luck getting Apple to sell them.

If my school district were to propose a large capital expenditure to buy iPads which would force them to buy all textbooks from a single vendor, Apple, I would go to the meetings and object.

It would be crazy for any school district to lock themselves into buying only Apple-approved texts. Apple has proven that the software it vends through its online stores is subject to secret and idiosyncratic approval mechanisms.

One vender? The books are from major publishers. How is it different than the ones from the same publisher you get in other platforms? If my kid's school has someone like you I'd go and vote to fire you in a heartbeat.
post #37 of 118
I can't help but think in the Education video Eddie Cue looks like an animated character: http://www.apple.com/education/#video-textbooks

Either way, I think this will be great for schools (like mine) planning on completely moving away from text and exercise books to iPads and Macs. This is technology, if used correctly, could really move schools 10 years ahead of where they are now.
post #38 of 118
Jesus - I can tell Americans struggle to speak ... seriously the phrase "Falling into disrepair" is now being distorted into "Falling in to disappear" ?? Surely this is a step too far towards stupidity or towards mishearing a well-known phrase in one's youth and then repeating the mistake ad nauseum until all are contamonated... a step even the US is unwilling to take ?? You are already struggling with English - why not take this further step I guess ... may these repeated mistakes not go "nucular" !

The terrible irony is this rampant stupidity and rampant abuse of the English language occurs in a post about education ... EDUCATION, of all things. Good Grief !!
post #39 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExceptionHandler View Post

I say leave evolution/millions of years out of the books and let kids figure it out on their own... in the end it would make them better problem solvers - force them to figure out what is true instead of just telling them what is true.


The facts supporting a geocentric universe could also be presented in a more balanced manner. Leave out all those bits about the "theory of universal gravitation". Let them figure out for themselves what is true.
post #40 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukeskymac View Post

So is your poorly constructed opinion on the matter.

Poor eightzero lives in Seattle, which is a suburb of Redmond () where I suspect many are having trouble right now in the mental-horizon department. I have an Apple-hater ex-friend up there, that's why I suspect this. Does anyone who is on the scene there have confirmation of this?
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