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Apple to reinvent the textbook with interactive iBooks 2 for iPad - Page 3

post #81 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by DamenS View Post

And then you get the Spanish speakers who allow you to understand why Americans can't speak English any more. Thank you for illustrating my point, Senior stupido !

Don't you mean: "El señor estúpido de la edad mejor?
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post #82 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

Or they could create an app for that, for that whole universe even. It could hold all the content from all the books, have character builders, map builders perhaps. If you were 'the Master' you could create the campaign and it would be recorded as people make their moves so if you had to cut short you could pick up where you left off and even review the old stuff. You could connect in folks that might not be in the room via some kind of networking system. Etc.

Exported interaction with these ibooks would be more of the 'make notes etc and be able to export them as an outline, study sheet' type stuff

They could, but right now the app is web based and built using Silverlight, which means it is incompatible w/the whole iOS universe. I want WotC to make sure their next round of products and support doesn't ignore that. Yes, I email them about this topic
post #83 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


Haven't read any of the posts here...

But the news in the SF Bay Area is reporting that UC is considering a tuition-paid education on all UC campuses. In exchange, the student would agree to pay 5% of his annual income for 20 years...

Thoughts?


On the plus side, a student can get a high quality education and go into a field that doesn't have a high salary rate (social services, education, new lawyers working as public defenders) without crushing debt. On the other hand, engineering and finance students will be supplementing barristas with medieval folk singing degrees.
post #84 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thorntondw View Post

More than anything Apple has done to date, this will change the world.

Here's one who understands!

Just as the iPad "gets out of the way" from in-between you and your stuff...

iPad/iBooks now "gets out of the way" from in-between you and your knowledge (learning capability).
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post #85 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Evolution is a theory, intelligent design is a faith. There is a massive difference here because one can't be disconnected from the teaching of religion. It isn't so much that many want evolution to be taught in schools it is the issue of using public schools as a state sponsored forum to teach a religious view point that they object to. It is all about trying to keep our crumbling Constitution intact.

I just wish they would teach exactly what constitutes a scientific theory. It's not just a hunch or a guess. In fact, high school (hell, grade school) sciences classes should teach the scientific process and how it works instead of a lot of the actual science they teach.

Once kids have to proper tools and know how to use them, you can teach any thing you want as far as I'm concerned.
post #86 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

A lot of this sounds like what I've been reading is in the new EPUB 3 standard. So really this is just ibooks updated to support that. But most teachers etc have no clue what EPUB 3 is or that there is a standard so rather than go into that more technical focus they looked at what you can do with this new version of ibooks. Typical Apple announcement protocol, they never to rarely look at the specs but rather what you can do with it in a practical sense.

Now it needs the tools to help make these things. My mother is a PhD in Art/Art and Architectural History and her AAH dissertation is one of her textbooks in her senior seminar. She has been saying for months that she wants to ebook the text (which she expanded to about 800 pages with photos etc). We tried it with the Pages template and it was rather gross looking. And she doesn't really do tech to do it all by hand and I'm too tied up with my own work. Something as simple as Pages or iWeb but with better coding would be great for her. And if she could add photos, video etc it would be a killer book. She already does Keynotes of the content for the students to download off her site but it would be so much easier if it was just in the book.

And if my mother could find a use for this I'm sure other subjects like the sciences totally could. Heck I'm already thinking about Film Studies books. Imagine you are reading about a particular cinematography technique and you can watch a sample video of it. Or talking about a certain film maker and you can see clips of key film moments. Right there in the book.

How about all those tutorials by Ripple Training, Larry Jordan, 2ReelGuys...

... An eBook telling the story of teaching story telling...

Now, not only will pilots use iPads to replace their flight bags...

But airplane maintenance people will use iPads/iBooks containing always-up-to-date, interactive reference/maintenance manuals...

And, that's just for starters...

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post #87 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExceptionHandler View Post

Observability, testability, repeatability, and falsifiability are the hallmarks of the scientific method. I say leave evolution/millions of years out of the books and let kids figure it out on their own... in the end it would make them better problem solvers - force them to figure out what is true instead of just telling them what is true.

So, do you leave out any discussion of the Big Bang and let them do their own glass spectrographs and studies on Type 1A Supernova to determine the relationship between brightness/decay and distance. Of course, you need to let them first discover the wave properties of light and the concept of absorption spectrums not to mention coming up with the periodic table of elements.

Heck, why not have your kids invent their own numbering system and figure out how to do math. Why even teach them Arabic numbers? Just see what they come up with.

Do you solve those realy simple problems in the K-12 timeframe?
post #88 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by vXhanz View Post


I just wish this wasn't targeted towards K-12... I could have used some serious relief in my college classes from the stagnant powerpoint lessons or even the cost of text books alone.

The advantage of targeting K-12 just now is that boards of education make large purchases of textbooks--or their e-equivalents, and if they buy in to this, large hardware purchases, too. College and university markets are different. It's likely that for many courses texts are the choice of individual instructors. (Although in the case of large intro courses in large schools, departments make a single choice for perhaps 500 students at a time.)

But the software that can build a compelling HS Bio or Chem text--or Math text--Can build any text or ancillary book I can imagine--and I've been a college teacher for close to 40 years.

So--aim at K-12 to make a big splash, and sell to the whole education enterprise, right through grad and professional school.
post #89 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExceptionHandler View Post

I dunno... the age of the earth (or anything really before written record of stuff) seems to be a moving target. WIth all the articles Ive read the age keeps being pushed further and further back. Before long they'll have the age of the earth as being in the order of quadrillions of years. In the end there is really no way of knowing as long as we rely on "educated guesses"/guesstimation. So if it MUST be included, then at least state that this is a "best guess" made by only some scientists instead of actual fact.

That is why you should stop reading books like "Of Panda and People". When I was a kid (35+ years back or so), the age of the Earth was estimated to be between 3.5 and 5.5 billion years old. When I was in high school, that figure was narrowed to between 4-5 billion. Now, with better instrumentation and tons and tons more data, that value is 4.54 billion +/- 1.5% at a 95% confidence.

All that has happened in the past 50 years is the targeted age and confidence has gotten more precise and more refined.

It is posts like yours that demonstrate the sad state of science education in the US.
post #90 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by DamenS View Post

I just assumed it was senility, but that was giving the "benefit of doubt" so I may have been wrong.

This should help you
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post #91 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conrail View Post

I just wish they would teach exactly what constitutes a scientific theory. It's not just a hunch or a guess. In fact, high school (hell, grade school) sciences classes should teach the scientific process and how it works instead of a lot of the actual science they teach.

I'm 35 and when I was in school they did teach the scientific method. Far as I know, they still do. It's part of science class
post #92 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

I mostly agree. But when it comes to the pay of teachers, I have a serious problem with the perception that's out there. On the surface, teachers do not get paid a lot. Teachers do not live in mansions - true enough. But teachers do ok. If they are careful with saving money, they can afford a mortgage. Furthermore, they have the whole frigging summer off. They have a good pension plan. And they can obtain tenure without much difficulty! I will go along with paying teachers more if they are willing to give up on some of these securities.

100% agree. I grew up as a child of an educator and understand first hand. One thing I always had trouble with is how difficult it is to get rid of a bad instructor. And there are lots of them (lots of bad parents out there as well). But one truth is always there. Talent follows the challenge with awarded compensation.
post #93 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

I wonder what they will add in iBooks 2?

As an engineer - what I would have liked to have would be an embedded scientific graphing calculator, so I could work through the examples the book gave, on my own. This would come in handy not only in technical books (Physics, Statics, Dynamics, Differential Equations, Calculus, Real/Imaginary and Matrix mathematics), but also for quick sanity checks for classes like Economics.

Being able to quickly open a window and plug in the formulas and run a couple examples would have been a great learning tool.

I'm excited to see what Apple is adding to the mix.

As a Mechanical Engineer why on Earth would you be plugging in your formulas first when you should be reducing your equations down to their simplest form of knowns and uknowns well before you pass in constants for the variables being represented?

If you're looking for a symbolic equation solver and thus not actually solving it yourself you can always by Mathematica.

Apple's not going to provide an HP 28S/48S/TI-83S style calculating solution and knife out the traditional handheld calculator providers. They don't provide one for OS X.

No operating system provides one, out of the box to match those products.

Besides, when you're actually taking large data sets for Numerical Analysis then your matrix computations go into a much larger product ala Octave, Matlab, etc.

I'd rather see efforts going into extending support for backends into the Publishing tool or an open spec to make extensions in XeTeX/XeLaTeX come about so creating the books will be an enjoyable process.
post #94 of 118
Apple has democratised the production of textbooks. Now anyone can produce a text book - including teachers, students and anyone else and put it the iBook store.

Schools can write their own text books. Students and teachers can collaborate.

No different than developers writing Apps for the App Store.

Result? Massive sales of the only tablet that matters - the iPad.

Schools will see this and take it up in their thousands.

Absolute genius move by Apple.
post #95 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyhrx View Post

Apple has democratised the production of textbooks. Now anyone can produce a text book - including teachers, students and anyone else and put it the iBook store.

Schools can write their own text books. Students and teachers can collaborate.

I can't be the only one that sees this as troubling. Where's the integrity? Is a creationist going to ban evolution in science books? Anyone produce textbooks?...Doesn't Wikipedia already exist?

I'm not too worried, the school district here can barely afford to pay their teachers' salaries and pensions (they're still on strike actually) I doubt they intend or can afford buying up iPads anyway.
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post #96 of 118
iDVD did not change the movie business, similarly iBook author will not dramatically change the textbook business. It's about content and quality of that content...
post #97 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by applestockholder View Post

iDVD did not change the movie business, similarly iBook author will not dramatically change the textbook business. It's about content and quality of that content...

Worst... analogy... EVER!

Apple didn't introduce a new medium with iDVD. It's in the name. They were using the same medium as other media being burned to DVD. On top of that, iDVD is a consumer product, not one for professionals. It wasn't made to change the movie industry as a whole or even the very small part that is the home viewings of movies at home.

What you need to look at is the what Apple is doing with the device and distribution. This is more akin to iTunes and App Store than some consumer app that is part of iLife that comes with every new Mac and is updated periodically.

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post #98 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by DamenS View Post

Jesus - I can tell Americans struggle to speak ... seriously the phrase "Falling into disrepair" is now being distorted into "Falling in to disappear" ?? Surely this is a step too far towards stupidity or towards mishearing a well-known phrase in one's youth and then repeating the mistake ad nauseum until all are contamonated... a step even the US is unwilling to take ?? You are already struggling with English - why not take this further step I guess ... may these repeated mistakes not go "nucular" !

The terrible irony is this rampant stupidity and rampant abuse of the English language occurs in a post about education ... EDUCATION, of all things. Good Grief !!

Oh, the irony. Yep!

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post #99 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by applestockholder View Post

iDVD did not change the movie business, similarly iBook author will not dramatically change the textbook business. It's about content and quality of that content...

Hear hear. OK, I've been branded a heretic; so be it. While there is a place for technology in education, replacing books is not it. There was a comment earlier about Apple perhaps policing the content, I'm not sure how that would work, or if it is possible or appropriate.

The iPad is an amazing device. I got one on launch day and love it. But...it is not a substitute for a textbook. There is value in peer review. Yes, that system needs help. Yes, book publishers have other options. And yes, consumers getting more options is a good thing. But when you're a K-12 teacher making $25k/yr, and you have 40 students with iPads (and who is going to pay for those iPads BTW?) and one malfunctions, who's going to fix it so we can do today's lesson? With a stack of books in the corner, you toss one to the kid and move on.

Content content content. The notes idea is fine - until you try to make it work. With a paper book and a pencil in hand, you have instant learning, not margin collections. In the instant you lose trying to work the technology, the insights that are part of learning are lost. The psychology of learning is very important here. I am skeptical this is a real improvement.

We will see how this plays out. I'm in the meh phase.

Yes, I'm in Seattle. No, I have no connection to the folks in Redmond. I'm an exclusive Apple consumer.

And thanks to everyone for making me feel welcome and valued. And yes, this is all just my opinion. It is worth what you paid for it.
post #100 of 118
As a Californian I can not help but feel emotions of dichotomy: it saddens me to see such a large disconnect between our public schools systems as some of the lowest rated in the country (and falling more every year- including the UC system) and the private entities like Apple that are advancing society through innovation and commitment to education. Will our public school systems be able to utilize such awesome technologies when public education is lower than prisons on the budget?
post #101 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by I am a Zither Zather Zuzz View Post

They might make them, but good luck getting Apple to sell them.

If my school district were to propose a large capital expenditure to buy iPads which would force them to buy all textbooks from a single vendor, Apple, I would go to the meetings and object.

It would be crazy for any school district to lock themselves into buying only Apple-approved texts. Apple has proven that the software it vends through its online stores is subject to secret and idiosyncratic approval mechanisms.

Using iPads doesn't force a school to only use the iPad. If a school moves 60%, 70%, etc., of its texts to iBooks but continues to use print editions for the remaining texts, it may still be worth the investment. A lot of teachers already make up their own loose-leaf supplements to the texts that they use, so I suspect many of those teachers will publish an iBooks supplement in addition to whatever print or iBooks text they use for their classes.

The big barrier will be the iPad itself; school systems are going to have to decide whether to buy iPads, require parents to pay an iPad fee, require parents to buy an iPad, etc. I suspect private school and small, suburban public school systems will move much faster toward adoption than bigger, urban school systems that are more resource-strapped and have a much larger one-time investment to make.
post #102 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by DamenS View Post

Jesus - I can tell Americans struggle to speak ... seriously the phrase "Falling into disrepair" is now being distorted into "Falling in to disappear" ?? Surely this is a step too far towards stupidity or towards mishearing a well-known phrase in one's youth and then repeating the mistake ad nauseum until all are contamonated...

Call off the panic attack, Chuckles. "Falling into disappear" is, I'll happily wager, the result of a mistyping of "disrepair" that was changed to "disappear" by automated spelling correction, followed by a failure to catch the error in proofreading. That's much more plausible than some tragic chain of miseducated Neanderthals passing along the (highly) unlikely expression "falling into disappear".

Unless you think proofreading errors don't happen, in which case "contamonation" is indeed the explanation.
post #103 of 118
If it aint broke, dont fix it.

Laptops in the classroom itself is a distraction.

This is going to be even more of a distraction.

Plenty of technology proponents love to boast about technology helping students learn more interactively.

I'd say BS.

It only introduces more distraction, a higher learning curve and more resources spent on the technology than the actual learning itself.

Instead of wasting money on useless technology, hire better qualified and more passionate teachers in the class rooms.

Teachers make the kids learn better, not technology.

Kids before the day of computers learned just as easily and effortlessly as kids in modern times.

What is the purpose of introducing ever more distracting technology into the hands of today's young ones?

Standardized test scores already show that kids nowadays are WORSE off than kids from 40 years ago.

Since when did higher education, or education system in general, became the peons of the corporate world?

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post #104 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

If it aint broke, dont fix it.

It's completely broken.

Quote:
This is going to be even more of a distraction.

Not when they don't have Internet access until the teacher allows it.

Quote:
Instead of wasting money on useless technology, hire better qualified and more passionate teachers in the class rooms.

You can't pay them to be better qualified. You can't teach passion.

Quote:
Teachers make the kids learn better, not technology.

So how do you plan on making the teachers learn better?

Quote:
Standardized test scores already show that kids nowadays are WORSE off than kids from 40 years ago.

And you think this implies what?

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #105 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

It's completely broken.

Not when they don't have Internet access until the teacher allows it.

You can't pay them to be better qualified. You can't teach passion.

So how do you plan on making the teachers learn better?

And you think this implies what?

First off, stop thinking like a shareholder and start thinking like a responsible adult who looks out for the future of this country.

Second, all Apple is trying to do is switch oligopoly business model of the publishers into a monopolistic business model with it being the sole driver. That would make the business even worse than it already is. (But for shareholders like you , you wouldn't give a damn).

Third, passion in learning CAN be instilled in kids. Develop new and "fun" ways of teaching the usually "boring" materials. Make kids apply the things that they learned to every day lives.

Fourth, are you going to shut off the internet access for grown up college aged students?
Good luck with that one when they are the ones paying the tuition.

Fifth, decrease in standardized tests, at least partially, indicates that more use of technology in the field of education has distracted many of these kids from achieving their best. Teaching styles and number of teachers have not changed over the years. Kids still attend the same amount of hours in school as kids from the past. The same teacher unions still exist today. That leaves money and technology as the only variables left that has actually changed.

Lastly, when 60% of the math and science college majors in the US are from foreign countries, that tells you something about the serious competitive problem that the US has.

Sooner or later, the majority of the people running the high tech businesses in this country will be foreigners. If not, many of the future companies wont even be based in the US. Thus, later the US's competitive edge will falter.

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post #106 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

(But for shareholders like you , you wouldn't give a damn).

Zero shares of stock in any company.

Quote:
Third, passion in learning CAN be instilled in kids. Develop new and "fun" ways of teaching the usually "boring" materials. Make kids apply the things that they learned to every day lives.

Hmm. I wonder if there's any way we could spice up boring paper textboOH WAIT.

Quote:
Fourth, are you going to shut off the internet access for grown up college aged students?

Uh, then they're old enough to be intelligent enough to know how to manage their time and pay attention.

Quote:
Good luck with that one when they are the ones paying the tuition.

They want to waste their money and fail their tests, that's fine with me.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

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post #107 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

First off, stop thinking like a shareholder and start thinking like a responsible adult who looks out for the future of this country.

Second, all Apple is trying to do is switch oligopoly business model of the publishers into a monopolistic business model with it being the sole driver. That would make the business even worse than it already is. (But for shareholders like you , you wouldn't give a damn).

Third, passion in learning CAN be instilled in kids. Develop new and "fun" ways of teaching the usually "boring" materials. Make kids apply the things that they learned to every day lives.

Fourth, are you going to shut off the internet access for grown up college aged students?
Good luck with that one when they are the ones paying the tuition.

Fifth, decrease in standardized tests, at least partially, indicates that more use of technology in the field of education has distracted many of these kids from achieving their best. Teaching styles and number of teachers have not changed over the years. Kids still attend the same amount of hours in school as kids from the past. The same teacher unions still exist today. That leaves money and technology as the only variables left that has actually changed.

Lastly, when 60% of the math and science college majors in the US are from foreign countries, that tells you something about the serious competitive problem that the US has.

Sooner or later, the majority of the people running the high tech businesses in this country will be foreigners. If not, many of the future companies wont even be based in the US. Thus, later the US's competitive edge will falter.

Your post is fraking nuts! I suppose we should just go with 16th century tech with the Amish because technological progress is making people less knowledgable.

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post #108 of 118
This is a fine summary of what was essentially a press release, but is summarizing a press release journalism? Aside from the fact that corporations love few things as much as people repeating their hype for free and would therefore never use the world, how is this different from plagiarism?

Once upon a time it wasn't possible for every interested individual to access the original source of some bit of information, but that's frequently no longer true. What's the point of all this repetition, sans analysis, sans contrasting arguments, sans any added content at all?

Content aggregation is nothing more than data flow as echo chamber. It's the cybernetic equivalent of a planet-wide game of "Chinese whispers," without the laughter.
post #109 of 118
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Your post is fraking nuts! I suppose we should just go with 16th century tech with the Amish because technological progress is making people less knowledgable.

If this was the initiative of a different technology company, Galbi would be jizzing his pants.
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post #110 of 118
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Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Indeed. I see major problems with content ahead.

Apple will no doubt start with the premise that they won't censor or edit content, but what if I want to make a sex education book available in the USA with "interactive elements?" what if I want to publish a Women's rights textbook in iBooks and make it available in United Arab Emirates?

Are people going to be allowed to publish anything at all and call it a textbook? They should be, but I don't see it happening. The US is one of the most anal, religious countries on earth. There are literally tons of topics (besides the obvious), that would be intolerable to that audience.

Who's going to check the facts on all this stuff?

Come on man. Anyone can publish pretty nice looking books already with services like Lulu and a decent graphic designer.

It's the UNIVERSITIES and SCHOOL BOARDS and MAJOR TEXTBOOK PUBLISHERS that set the curriculum and decide what textbooks are going to be read. That's not going to change.

I think this is absolutely amazing. I remember being in university back in the early 1990s and lugging a hockey bag's weight worth of books that cost a fortune. And NONE of them would play full screen videos on demand! It's truly amazing we are even talking about this.

Textsbooks are a huge business and I think just like smartphones, Apple is going to become a major player here as well.
post #111 of 118
My eyes are in tears and my jaw is on the floor. I cannot even begin to tell you how profund this is in general and specifically in relation to what I want to do with the iPad this year.

This is... my God, I can't even... begin
post #112 of 118
BTW Terry McGraw was a ****** (insert appropriate expletive) for leaking the iPad launch but at the end of the day McGraw Hill is just too massive in education to not be involved.
post #113 of 118
Steve was right... when the dots connect... Boom! But you can't connect the dots going forward (not often, anyway), you can only connect them looking back. I'm just floored. It will take a few days or weeks to digest this. Thank goodness I didn't watch this last night I wouldn't have been able to sleep.
post #114 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by tyler82 View Post

As a Californian I can not help but feel emotions of dichotomy: it saddens me to see such a large disconnect between our public schools systems as some of the lowest rated in the country (and falling more every year- including the UC system) and the private entities like Apple that are advancing society through innovation and commitment to education. Will our public school systems be able to utilize such awesome technologies when public education is lower than prisons on the budget?

That has always been the American dilemma. You can soar as high as you can dream, but you can also crash as low as the sea.

BTW Phil was immensely reserved compared to previous presentations... Do you think he might be on his way out or assigned to a different role (probably the latter?) A bit strange, I'm sure we'll see what happens in due time.
post #115 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyhrx View Post

Apple has democratised the production of textbooks. Now anyone can produce a text book - including teachers, students and anyone else and put it the iBook store.

Schools can write their own text books. Students and teachers can collaborate.

No different than developers writing Apps for the App Store.

Result? Massive sales of the only tablet that matters - the iPad.

Schools will see this and take it up in their thousands.

Absolute genius move by Apple.

Yeah, because making money is more important than giving out quality information.

In the real textbook world, there is such a thing called "peer review" system.

Open up any college textbook, turn to the first couple of pages in the book. You will see a whole slew of names with their associated school affiliations on it.

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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post #116 of 118
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Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

That has always been the American dilemma. You can soar as high as you can dream, but you can also crash as low as the sea.

BTW Phil was immensely reserved compared to previous presentations... Do you think he might be on his way out or assigned to a different role (probably the latter?) A bit strange, I'm sure we'll see what happens in due time.

I disagree. This is pretty much Phil Schiller's style. He also sounds like he has reciting a rehearsed speech written by someone else. Passion seems to emerge in some words, and then disappears again. Rosner did a better job.
post #117 of 118
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Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Yeah, because making money is more important than giving out quality information.

In the real textbook world, there is such a thing called "peer review" system.

Open up any college textbook, turn to the first couple of pages in the book. You will see a whole slew of names with their associated school affiliations on it.

IOW, Galbi thinks that digitally distinuted textbooks can't be of huh quality or peer reviewed. You are awesome¡

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #118 of 118
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Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

Hear hear. OK, I've been branded a heretic; so be it. While there is a place for technology in education, replacing books is not it. There was a comment earlier about Apple perhaps policing the content, I'm not sure how that would work, or if it is possible or appropriate.

The iPad is an amazing device. I got one on launch day and love it. But...it is not a substitute for a textbook. There is value in peer review. Yes, that system needs help. Yes, book publishers have other options. And yes, consumers getting more options is a good thing. But when you're a K-12 teacher making $25k/yr, and you have 40 students with iPads (and who is going to pay for those iPads BTW?) and one malfunctions, who's going to fix it so we can do today's lesson? With a stack of books in the corner, you toss one to the kid and move on.

Content content content. The notes idea is fine - until you try to make it work. With a paper book and a pencil in hand, you have instant learning, not margin collections. In the instant you lose trying to work the technology, the insights that are part of learning are lost. The psychology of learning is very important here. I am skeptical this is a real improvement.

We will see how this plays out. I'm in the meh phase.

Yes, I'm in Seattle. No, I have no connection to the folks in Redmond. I'm an exclusive Apple consumer.

And thanks to everyone for making me feel welcome and valued. And yes, this is all just my opinion. It is worth what you paid for it.

Apologies for accusing you of being a Microsoft mouthpiece. But now I have to find another explanation for your first post, shockingly negative on what I and others thought was a breakthrough announcement on Apple's constructive use of technology. I also confess that the two words I hate to see here the most are "underwhelmed" and "meh," both of which you've managed to use.

To me these always bespeak a lack of vision and imagination on the part of the user. I started seeing these two words when the iPad was originally announced. I was so infuriated be the dumbness (as in numbness, insensitivity) of these meh-ists that I was provoked to eventually join AI to make myself feel better by responding. I've come to believe that meh-ism is a corollary to narcissism, but the particular kind of narcissism created by powerful personal gadgetry. A generation of twitchy gamers have arisen who can't comprehend anything elegant or subtle, can't envision how others might use or enjoy something as unassuming as the iPad seemed to be at first -- just a big iPod touch, after all.

So does this make any sense to you? Apple has just revolutionized book production. We had rain post an equally negative response in another thread, and he is in Vancouver. Someone suggested he had water on the brain. Is there an affect disorder in the Pacific Northwest that makes people hostile to great new things happening?
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