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iTunes U for iPad offers full courses, teacher updates, class enrollment

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
The new iTunes U application for iPad unveiled by Apple on Thursday will allow college students to view course materials, receive updates from their teachers, and even sign up for classes.

“The all-new iTunes U app enables students anywhere to tap into entire courses from the world's most prestigious universities,” said Eddy Cue, Apple’s senior vice president of Internet Software and Services. “Never before have educators been able to offer their full courses in such an innovative way, allowing anyone who’s interested in a particular topic to learn from anywhere in the world, not just the classroom.”

In its presentation to the press, Apple showed off an online course from Duke for "Core Concepts in Chemistry." In the iTunes U application, students can get an overview of the course, view teacher details, obtain the class syllabus, and even access information like the teacher's office hours.

The iTunes U application for iPad has sections for "Info," "Posts," "Notes" and "Materials." In the "Posts" section, teachers can provide updates to students, including assignments.

The assignments can even be context sensitive, allowing a student to tap on it and automatically be sent to the appropriate section of a textbook in iBooks. When an assignment is completed, it can be crossed off of the included task list.

In the "Notes" tab, users can access and modify their class notes, even highlighting certain text. And the "Materials" tab shows off all of the material for a course, including textbooks, videos, audio, and documents.




The iTunes U application will even allow students to sign up for courses from directly within the software. Courses and professors can even be rated through iTunes U for iPad.

While books and applications required for courses do have costs, the iTunes U application itself is free and now available on the iPad App Store. Participating schools that have had early access to the software are Duke, Yale, Harrisburg Area Community College, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and The Open University.
post #2 of 13
Seems that crap, who was it. He predicted credits for iTunes U was exactly right.

I just wonder if these are LEGIT courses that count for real-world credit.
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The new iTunes U application for iPad unveiled by Apple on Thursday will allow college students to view course materials, receive updates from their teachers, and even sign up for classes.

In its presentation to the press, Apple showed off an online course from Duke for "Core Concepts in Chemistry." In the iTunes U application, students can get an overview of the course, view teacher details, obtain the class syllabus, and even access information like the teacher's office hours.

The iTunes U application for iPad has sections for "Info," "Posts," "Notes" and "Materials." In the "Posts" section, teachers can provide updates to students, including assignments.

The assignments can even be context sensitive, allowing a student to tap on it and automatically be sent to the appropriate section of a textbook in iBooks. When an assignment is completed, it can be crossed off of the included task list.

In the "Notes" tab, users can access and modify their class notes, even highlighting certain text. And the "Materials" tab shows off all of the material for a course, including textbooks, videos, audio, and documents.

The iTunes U application will even allow students to sign up for courses from directly within the software. Courses and professors can even be rated through iTunes U for iPad.

While books and applications required for courses do have costs, the iTunes U application itself is free and now available on the iPad App Store. Participating schools that have had early access to the software are Duke, Yale, Harrisburg Area Community College, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and The Open University.

This is going to create HUGE problems in Education outside of the USA.

It could potentially supplant the Education systems of entire countries and replace it with the US one (or at least there will be great pressure to do so form the teachers themselves), when in fact it's use would be mostly illegal in other western countries. It will be interesting to see what happens in regards the laws and wether it will change to accommodate Apple, or whether Apple will change to accommodate the law.

So ironic that the US is doing this also when the US education system is recognised world-wide for it's poor quality.
post #4 of 13
Just been looking through the courses. I already know them all. But hopefully this is just the start.
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

This is going to create HUGE problems in Education outside of the USA.

It could potentially supplant the Education systems of entire countries and replace it with the US one (or at least there will be great pressure to do so form the teachers themselves), when in fact it's use would be mostly illegal in other western countries. It will be interesting to see what happens in regards the laws and wether it will change to accommodate Apple, or whether Apple will change to accommodate the law.

So ironic that the US is doing this also when the US education system is recognised world-wide for it's poor quality.

The Open University is a British institution operating by Royal Charter.
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Seems that crap, who was it. He predicted credits for iTunes U was exactly right.

I just wonder if these are LEGIT courses that count for real-world credit.

I imagine it's as legit as any other online course from an accredited school.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

This is going to create HUGE problems in Education outside of the USA.

So ironic that the US is doing this also when the US education system is recognised world-wide for it's poor quality.

Except for the fact that 16 of the top 20 Universities are US institutions. K-12 in the US is not doing that great, but perhaps change (such as interactive learning materials) could help bring a little excitement back to the classroom. Not to mention lower costs on books, so that money can be spent on other educational costs.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Seems that crap, who was it. He predicted credits for iTunes U was exactly right.

I just wonder if these are LEGIT courses that count for real-world credit.

Probably. I could definitely see this kind of gig being used for 10x level classes where you need to push 1000+ students through the system at once. Those that want to 'attend' in their bed in the dorms can do so. Or kids that want to pack their schedule can take some classes this way (if the lectures are still via a podcasting system after the fact) and just show up to take the test or turn on their homework (if that isn't also online).

In fact they could turn this into the new CLEP. Not to toot my own horn too much but I was doing college level reading when I was a Sophomore in High School (via AP English). I was able to test out of English 101 that way but my school didn't have any AP History classes being offered. In theory the school I wanted to attend would take advance level high school kids and let them attend fresher classes but I couldn't drive at that point and the school was an hour each way by bus. Not really practical. But if I could 'attend' online then I could have squared away those credits before I showed up via the actual classes and not the independent study way that I actually did do it (thanks to getting a copy of the syllabus etc from a friend of my older brother who was at the same school and took said classes)

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toruk View Post

The Open University is a British institution operating by Royal Charter.

and its jolly good too.

I bet many of our younger USA based members won't know that it was quite common back in the early 70's, for 'regular Joes' to come back from the pub of an evening, switch on the TV (we only had 4 channels) and we (they) would watch OU professors explaining laws of thermodynamics, modeling etc.
So many people would actually learn stuff, even if they were not on the courses.
post #10 of 13
some of those ou programs were excellent, i did a couple of their courses ages back

the maths lecturers had criminal dress sense, and i always enjoyed the art criticism programs with the american guy who looked a bit like art buchwald, he just sat on the sofa drinking and chain smoking, looked like he was having a great time

as far as itunes u goes, does nothing an open website couldn't do better, education shouldn't be proprietary
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by umumum View Post

i) I don't argue with forum fools, my time is too precious
ii) It's up to the fool to learn for themselves, it's not my job to teach them
iii) I don't read a fool's responses, they are just shouting into the void

Reading your signature, this Plato quote comes to mind:
Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools speak because they have to say something.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by umumum View Post

some of those ou programs were excellent, i did a couple of their courses ages back

the maths lecturers had criminal dress sense, and i always enjoyed the art criticism programs with the american guy who looked a bit like art buchwald, he just sat on the sofa drinking and chain smoking, looked like he was having a great time

as far as itunes u goes, does nothing an open website couldn't do better, education shouldn't be proprietary

Agree with the OU talk so far on here. It's a widely respected institution over here.

However, as for your last sentence, it's a familiar argument, and one with a familar rejoinder - could, but hasn't/didn't.

The content isn't proprietry anyway, just some of the course schedules via the App. I often pick an essay or lecture to listen instead of a podcast or album on the drive into work. I can only think good things about the whole iTunes U thing, they don't have to do this, and it's been there sitting quietly for years gaining content without making a fuss, just waiting for someone to step back and work out how to integrate this into something larger. I'm quite excited about the whole thing.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

This is going to create HUGE problems in Education outside of the USA.

It could potentially supplant the Education systems of entire countries and replace it with the US one (or at least there will be great pressure to do so form the teachers themselves), when in fact it's use would be mostly illegal in other western countries. It will be interesting to see what happens in regards the laws and wether it will change to accommodate Apple, or whether Apple will change to accommodate the law.

So ironic that the US is doing this also when the US education system is recognised world-wide for it's poor quality.

THe US universities remain highly regarded. It's the high school system that stands to improve. Regardless, I don't quite get (or agree?) with your first premise. Universities from all over can integrate with iTunes U too?
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