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First Look: Apple's new iBooks Author

post #1 of 93
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Apple has released its new iBooks Author in the Mac App Store for free, enabling users to create dynamic, multimedia ebooks targeted for iPad deployment.

The new iBooks Author is billed as a tool to "create and publish amazing Multi-Touch books for iPad," but can also export to a standard PDF viewable anywhere. The main thrust is in creating ebook titles for the iBookstore.

Getting published

Apple notes, "You can request that your book be made available for public download by submitting it to the iBookstore," which requires creating a seller account, downloading iTunes Producer (used to upload content to the iTunes Store), and signing a publisher contract.

Submitted books must offer a free sample, although the publisher can decide how much and what content to offer in this sample. The file limit for published books is 2 GB, but Apple recommends that authors keep their ebooks under 1 GB and notes that readers on 3G networks are limited to downloads of 20 MB or less.

Books published through iBooks are protected with iTunes' FairPlay which "helps prevent unauthorized duplication of your book," but Apple adds that "movies and audio included in HTML widgets are not DRM protected."

Authors can also export book files they can distribute on their own, in addition to exporting a PDF or the plain text of their work.

Authoring books

The new iBooks Author app interface will be very familiar to iWork users, with an appearance similar to Keynote and text editing features virtually identical to Pages.




Like other iWork apps, when opened it presents a template chooser offering a half dozen professionally designed textbook types named basic, contemporary, modern type, classic, editorial and craft.




In the portrait orientation, iBooks Author presents the text of the book (below is the classic template) as it would appear on an iPad, with a primarily text-based focus.




Set to landscape orientation (from the tool bar), the presentation is laid out more akin to Keynote slides, with all photos, movies and other content appearing inline.




The basic features of template includes the Book Title graphics, "Intro Media," which is an introductory image or video that plays when the book is opened, a Table of Contents generated automatically as you create new chapters and sections of content, and a Glossary of terms that includes a definition, links to related glossary terms, and an index of where the word appears in the text.






For an immediate preview of how the book looks on an iPad, the user can simply plug in an iPad via USB and click the Preview toolbar button. A dialog sheet drops down to select the device, and as long as the connected iPad has the iBooks 2.0 app running, the in-progress book will appear in its iBooks library as a viewable title labeled "proof."

Exported as a text file, the document appears as an ".ibooks" document. It's also possible to export an ".iba" file for moving the book project to another Mac running iBooks Author.

There's currently no support for importing and converting existing complex documents, such as PDFs or EPUB ebooks; only basic support of text input, including content from Word or Pages documents.

On of 2: Working with iBooks Author

Working with iBooks Author sections and pages

Laying out new pages of a new iBook works like iWork's Pages, where you must edit the content to rearrange its position within a chapter or section. You can't simply drag around individual pages because your text repaginates across pages.

As you type text into the flow of the book (or import existing text from Word or Pages, one chapter at a time), new pages are automatically created. You can also add arbitrary text blocks anywhere in the page, but this text isn't connected to the text flow of the book. Conversely, you don't have to manually create text blocks that flow the main content of the book from one page to the next; that's done automatically.

Individual chapters and sections behave like Keynote slides, allowing you to freely drag them around the rearrange their order. As you create and rearrange chapters and sections, the Table of Contents automatically updates. Each template provides a selection of chapter and section layout types, also similar to Keynote.




In the classic template, a chapter layout can be a Preface or a Chapter, while the section layouts offer a basic design for a Section, Section Text, Copyright, Forward or a Dedication page. Within a section, a page template can offer one, two or three columns of text.




Embellishing pages

From the basic page template, authors can add arbitrary text boxes, shapes (which may also contain text), tables and charts, all in the same way these elements are added within Keynote or Pages; just drag the item into the page, customize its attributes, define it as inline, floating or anchored with the type of text wrap desired and set a level of opacity, shadow and other features.

Like other iWork apps, it's easy to drop in photos, videos and audio using the standard Media Browser.

Something new in iBooks Author is support for Widgets, an idea taken from iWeb for adding a self-contained bit of interactive content. In iBooks Author, there are a half dozen provided Widgets, including:

Gallery (adds a sequence of graphics with captions that users can swipe between).




Media (embeds an AAC audio or H.264 video the reader can play)

Review (adds an interactive multiple choice or drag to match question for readers to review the material presented)




Keynote (embeds a presentation presented as HTML)

Interactive Image (creates an image with "callout" labels and supporting zooming in for detail)




3D (embeds a COLLADA 3D model that the reader can rotate). Apple says the first-generation iPad "is optimized for viewing 3D objects with fewer than 20,000 moderately textured polygons" while iPad 2 "supports viewing 3D objects in a completed book with up to 50,000 moderately textured polygons." Objects can be set to auto rotate in the finished book, but aren't animated in iBooks Author.

HTML (adds an interactive Dashboard widget to the book).

After a Widget is dropped in the page, you can add accessibility text via the Inspector, which identifies the content when users activate VoiceOver when using the digital book. Other attributes of the widget can similarly be set from the Inspector.

iBooks Author in review

Overall, the new iBooks Author app feels like a natural part of iWork, and what iWeb "should have been." The difference with iWeb is that iBooks Author now targets the iPad with what is essentially a rich, self contained web app that has a lot in common with iTunes Extras and iTunes LP, but extremely easy to create (rather than generating fancy web pages like iWeb, some features of which many browsers had trouble rendering properly).

Just using the built in functionality, iBooks Authors allows anyone to create interactive books, with a focus on creating immersive textbooks. By incorporating standards-based Dashboard Widgets, which are created from HTML, CSS and JavaScript (and can be built using Apple's Dashcode development tool), authors and publishers can develop their own novel types of interactivity.

The new app opens up lots of opportunities for anyone wanting to publish professional looking material with automated reference features (including an indexed Glossary of terms and an easily searchable Table of Contents) and learning tools, and promised to make iPads in education even more useful and customizable.
post #2 of 93
Adobe staff must be crying right now...
post #3 of 93
I always wanted to publish my own book with large exposure this is perfect!!

I guess I'll resign my job and turn into a freelance Hank Moody right now.

Thank you so much Apple!
post #4 of 93
NOTE: requires Mac OS 10.7 - Lion
post #5 of 93
I think some people owe that Ars Techncia guy an apology.

This is totally awesome btw. I'm blown away that it's free. Can't wait to download it this weekend.
post #6 of 93
That's pretty fast review work. Didn't you just post an article two days ago about how this event was NOT going to be about a new text book authoring tool?

http://iphone.appleinsider.com/artic...not_tools.html
post #7 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by aderutter View Post

Adobe staff must be crying right now...

While their senior management continues on totally oblivious.

It's insane that Apple beat Adobe to market with a tool like this. Totally insane. Creating tools like this ought to be Adobe's entire reason to exist. What a bunch of knuckleheads.
post #8 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by aderutter View Post

Adobe staff must be crying right now...

LOL
post #9 of 93
Apple is really driving a dagger into Adobe now. While this doesn't kill Adobe's InDesign but looks a lot more intuitive to learn and it's FREE ... I'm looking forward to test out this app soon.
post #10 of 93
I have downloaded iBooks Author and have tried to open the ePub books that I had purchased from Cisco Press - they are non-DRM ePub books that I can read on my iPad and iPhone, using the iBooks app in iOS.

Here's the problem - I cannot open any ePub books in iBooks Author. So, my hopes that iBooks Author would not only allow one to publish eBooks, but also read non-DRM ePub books ,as well as Apple DRM ePub books purchased in iBooks store, have been dashed.

When you save a file in iBooks Author, it saves it with extension .iba You can also export your file from iBooks Author as .pdf, .txt, or .ibooks. PDF files exported like this can be opened in any PDF reading software, including Preview and Adobe Acrobat Reader. The .txt file exported from iBooks Author file has absolutely no formatting applied to it - not even line breaks. The .ibooks file exported from iBooks Author can probably be read in the iOS iBooks app; unfortunately, iBooks Author cannot open a file with .ibooks extension even though it has just created this file as an export; neither can iBooks Author open a .pdf file that it has just created as an export.

So, to me, this tool has a very limited functionality - probably due to intellectual property rights restriction.

I especially find the limitation of not being able to read non-DRM ePub format to be disappointing. I can see why Apple would not allow one to edit an ePub book, but I cannot see why this application cannot read ePub books or export your own writing into the non-DRM'ed ePub format. I guess if you decide to sell your book via the iBooks store, Apple will convert the .iba file into the Apple-DRM'ed ePub and will be selling it in that format. But if I don't want to sell books but rather want to convert hundreds of Gigabytes of technical documentation that I have written over many years from MS Word (.doc) into non-DRM'ed ePub, I am out of luck. The reason that I do not want to convert these documents into PDF is that PDF-formatted documents cannot be re-sized in the iBooks app on the iPad or iPhone, whereas ePub documents can be re-sized on the fly based on the screen size and resolution.

You cannot just open an MS Word document or a Pages document in iBooks Author. You can insert a "Chapter from Pages or word document ...", but the import from MS Word did not preserve all the formatting. So, this functionality may be useful with files created in Pages but is questionable with files created in MS Word.

So far - I'm not impressed. I am hoping that iWork '12 is around the corner, and it would allow one to at least read ePub books in Pages '12.
post #11 of 93
iBooks Author turns out to be a lot more powerful than I expected. So much for iBooks open standards that was touted in the original introduction. Talk about synergies in the Apple ecosystem. This really does solidify the iPad as the education platform. I do think they need to bring it to the Mac as well though. Any word on the DRM capabilities?

I didn't bring my MBP with Lion today so I can't try it out right now on SL but I'm really interested how it handles the Algebraic formulas since I noticed one of the templates is Algebra. Math has been very difficult to do in HTML so I am curious how they addressed this.

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post #12 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I'm really interested how it handles the Algebraic formulas since I noticed one of the templates is Algebra. Math has been very difficult to do in HTML so I am curious how they addressed this.

As far as I can see, they don't handle it at all, which is quite a bummer. I'm not so sure how easy it would be to create some textbooks that call for math, chemical formula, etc
post #13 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirozha View Post

When you save a file in iBooks Author, it saves it with extension .iba You can also export your file from iBooks Author as .pdf, .txt, or .ibooks. PDF files exported like this can be opened in any PDF reading software, including Preview and Adobe Acrobat Reader. The .txt file exported from iBooks Author file has absolutely no formatting applied to it - not even line breaks. The .ibooks file exported from iBooks Author can probably be read in the iOS iBooks app; unfortunately, iBooks Author cannot open a file with .ibooks extension even though it has just created this file as an export.

I guess there is no editing the raw source code then. That sucks. I can see why they would want to lock it down but I was hoping they would keep backward compatibility with open standards ePub.

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post #14 of 93
Unfortunately, the documents are not compatible with the iPhone version of iBooks. They can be loaded into the library, but not actually viewed.
post #15 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirozha View Post

So far - I'm not impressed. I am hoping that iWork '12 is around the corner, and it would allow one to at least read ePub books in Pages '12.

Well, I have just had a quick look and so far I am hugely impressed. I am thinking photo books for family and friends. It is now VERY easy to create a photo book with video and images and distribute it to relevant parties. Photo books are generally crap but creating them like this is fast and easy, and viewing on iPads is so much better than paper. (Specially when a high res iPad arrives)

I can see companies creating catalogues, instructions, training course work, manuals etc etc for limited distribution. I think this alone is a big WOW!

For better or worse every Tom Dick and Harry will now produce their own book and publish it in the iBookstore.

I think this is going to be huge, ruffle many feathers, thrill a lot of people....
post #16 of 93
Maybe it's me, but the page 2 of the article link doesn't seem to work.
post #17 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by sportyguy209 View Post

Maybe it's me, but the page 2 of the article link doesn't seem to work.

No, it's me too.
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post #18 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Well, I have just had a quick look and so far I am hugely impressed. I am thinking photo books for family and friends. It is now VERY easy to create a photo book with video and images and distribute it to relevant parties. Photo books are generally crap but creating them like this is fast and easy, and viewing on iPads is so much better than paper. (Specially when a high res iPad arrives)

I can see companies creating catalogues, instructions, training course work, manuals etc etc for limited distribution. I think this alone is a big WOW!

For better or worse every Tom Dick and Harry will now produce their own book and publish it in the iBookstore.

I think this is going to be huge, ruffle many feathers, thrill a lot of people....

It is so much fun and with PDF export too! This like PageMaker meets Pages on Steroids.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #19 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirozha View Post

You cannot just open an MS Word document or a Pages document in iBooks Author. You can insert a "Chapter from Pages or word document ...", but the import from MS Word did not preserve all the formatting. So, this functionality may be useful with files created in Pages but is questionable with files created in MS Word.

Have you tried inserting from Pages? An important function, if it works.

I would try this myself but I am stuck on Snow Leopard so iBooks Author is out of reach for me right now.
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post #20 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Have you tried inserting from Pages? An important function, if it works.

I would try this myself but I am stuck on Snow Leopard so iBooks Author is out of reach for me right now.

I don't have Pages - I am waiting for new iWork to be released. I have been using MS Office (first '08 and then '11) ever since I switched from PCs four years ago, and frankly, the new iWork cannot come out soon enough for me at this point. I just don't feel like buying the old version unless Apple decides to provide free upgrade to the new version. I know Apple is not making a lot of money on iWork, but if they announced a free future upgrade, they could have had so many more people switch from MS Office to iWork, knowing that when the new iWork becomes available, they can just upgrade for free (or a nominal fee of a few dollars).

Additionally, because Apple did not protect DVD versions of iWork from unauthorized duplication in the past, there was no easy way for them to tell if a person has purchased iWork or just pirated it. Now that iWork is available via the Mac App Store, they can control who gets a free upgrade to the new iWork and who has to purchase it for the full price.
post #21 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

While their senior management continues on totally oblivious.

It's insane that Apple beat Adobe to market with a tool like this. Totally insane. Creating tools like this ought to be Adobe's entire reason to exist. What a bunch of knuckleheads.

I had originally thought before the iPad was ever even demoed that Apple would have to heavily focus on creation tools for remaining textbooks to make the iPad work for education. I had incorrectly assumed this would have to be a driving force out of the gate. I'm glad I'm somewhat redeemed 2 years later.

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post #22 of 93
This is the tool I've been waiting for. I hope they make publishing your work just as easy. I'm a bit concerned that nothing was done to upgrade iTunes producer.
post #23 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

While their senior management continues on totally oblivious.

It's insane that Apple beat Adobe to market with a tool like this. Totally insane. Creating tools like this ought to be Adobe's entire reason to exist. What a bunch of knuckleheads.

Of course, if Adobe released a product like this it would be fantastically elaborate, with hundreds of fiddly control palettes, almost unbelievably obscure keyboard shortcuts, an extremely steep learning curve, and offloading or replication of much functionality onto other Adobe products. And it would cost $500 or more.

I think Apple has really hit on something here-- while their layout tools will never compete with InDesign, textbooks don't need to be the kind of works of art that require extensive control over every parameter-- the kind of extensive control that keeps design pros well compensated.

Text books need to be functional. Apple has provided the tools to move information into functional, interactive containers, and the delivery system to show off those containers in the best light. Making the tools free and easy to use means text books can be authored more quickly and at lower costs, and providing templates means they can still be well laid out and enjoyable to use.
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post #24 of 93
Pardon my dullness and some basic confusion -- perhaps it's because of information overload. I have a very simple question.

The caveats (and probably intro-level hiccups) notwithstanding: does iBook Author allow me to dress up a collection of my Word and/or Pages documents into a "book"-like format, then save it as a .iba file, upload it onto some public (or other) folder, from where anyone with an iPad can download and view the 'book'? (Can someone running Lion on a Mac do the same on their Mac?)

If 'yes,' how does someone get it into their iPad?

Add: I guess, simply put, the question I am asking is, can I use iBook Author as a 'private distribution' channel for my work to be distributed directly to those with hardware that can view it, than necessarily having to upload it on to the iBook Store and have people download it from there?
post #25 of 93
Unless I missed something I still see no way to view these e-Books on regular laptops. Now people have to have an iPad AND a laptop...
post #26 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirozha View Post

I don't have Pages - I am waiting for new iWork to be released. I have been using MS Office (first '08 and then '11) ever since I switched from PCs four years ago, and frankly, the new iWork cannot come out soon enough for me at this point. I just don't feel like buying the old version unless Apple decides to provide free upgrade to the new version. I know Apple is not making a lot of money on iWork, but if they announced a free future upgrade, they could have had so many more people switch from MS Office to iWork, knowing that when the new iWork becomes available, they can just upgrade for free (or a nominal fee of a few dollars).

Additionally, because Apple did not protect DVD versions of iWork from unauthorized duplication in the past, there was no easy way for them to tell if a person has purchased iWork or just pirated it. Now that iWork is available via the Mac App Store, they can control who gets a free upgrade to the new iWork and who has to purchase it for the full price.

As you say, to date Apple hasn't offered any upgrade path for iWork (would be nice, since I've been with them on this since the first version), but the cost of the software has always been nominal so I don't complain. The real barrier for me now is Lion.

If anyone has tried the insert function from Pages I'd be very interested in a report.
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post #27 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirozha View Post

Here's the problem - I cannot open any ePub books in iBooks Author. So, my hopes that iBooks Author would not only allow one to publish eBooks, but also read non-DRM ePub books ,as well as Apple DRM ePub books purchased in iBooks store, have been dashed.


?!

It's a content CREATOR, not a content READER. You're asking it to do something that it's not designed for (or advertised as) doing.
There are several other apps (non-Apple) that will allow you to read non-drm ePub on your Mac.
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post #28 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Pardon my dullness and some basic confusion -- perhaps it's because of information overload. I have a very simple question.

The caveats (and probably intro-level hiccups) notwithstanding: does iBook Author allow me to dress up a collection of my Word and/or Pages documents into a "book"-like format, then save it as a .iba file, upload it onto some public (or other) folder, from where anyone with an iPad can download and view the 'book'? (Can someone running Lion on a Mac do the same on their Mac?)

If 'yes,' how does someone get it into their iPad?

Add: I guess, simply put, the question I am asking is, can I use iBook Author as a 'private distribution' channel for my work to be distributed directly to those with hardware that can view it, than necessarily having to upload it on to the iBook Store and have people download it from there?

I haven't tried it yet, but it appears that the .ibooks format is the one you could transfer to the iPad, not the .iba format. The .iba format is the format in which you can save the book on which you are working in iBooks Author. Once the book is ready, you have to export it to the .ibooks format. As for transferring the book to the iPad, Apple has just released iTunes 10.3, and iBooks 2 for iPad, so I think you can add your eBook (exported into the .ibooks format) to the iTunes library in iTunes 3 and then drag it from the "Books" section of iTunes to the iPad in the side bar and drop it there. If you have enabled wireless sync with you iPad (in iOS 5), you don't even have to plug your iPad in to your computer to be able to transfer any content to your iPad via iTunes.
post #29 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by toysandme View Post

Unless I missed something I still see no way to view these e-Books on regular laptops. Now people have to have an iPad AND a laptop...

If you are just a reader you can use an iDevice, but if you are an author you need both a Mac and iPad for creation and testing. If fact, Apple is going out of their way to require an iPad by offering a Preview option in IBooks Author that will check for connected iPads with iBooks open so it can push the book for testing. I don't understand why they would go to this much trouble than just allowing iBooks to be viewable in Mac OS X.

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post #30 of 93
My greatest concern about interactive textbooks is the amount of storage they use. I hope Apple's purchase of Anobit will give them a pricing advantage when it comes to offering greater standard storage for the next iPad.
post #31 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by toysandme View Post

Unless I missed something I still see no way to view these e-Books on regular laptops. Now people have to have an iPad AND a laptop...

I suspect that at some point you will see an iBook Creator for the iPad. It is just Pages with some tweaks, after all (isn't it?).

My surprise is that being so similar to Pages they didn't update the interface. Like in Pages et al the floating Inspector and the Media browser options are not great imo.
post #32 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by toysandme View Post

Unless I missed something I still see no way to view these e-Books on regular laptops. Now people have to have an iPad AND a laptop...

Yeah, and I doubt there will ever be. Who says you have to have a laptop? Desktops exist. Eventually there won't BE laptops.

Just iPads and desktop multitouch solutions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

I suspect that at some point you will see an iBook Creator for the iPad. It is just Pages with some tweaks, after all (isn't it?).

No, this certainly isn't Pages. It's inspired by it, sure, but it's not Pages by a long shot.

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post #33 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by aderutter View Post

Adobe staff must be crying right now...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

While their senior management continues on totally oblivious.

It's insane that Apple beat Adobe to market with a tool like this. Totally insane. Creating tools like this ought to be Adobe's entire reason to exist. What a bunch of knuckleheads.

It's just not the tools, it's the entire ecosystem that Adobe would never be able to pull off. The tools being free is just that start. Now the individual can create the content and immediately have access to literally millions of people via the bookstore to sell their books.

I see this not only as a blow to Adobe for the tools, but also to other online retailers like Amazon. They'll have to do some swift work to attract independent authors.

As usual, Apple didn't invent the concept like I'm sure the iHaters will point out, but Apple did reinvent the game. As they did with app developers, they're doing the same with book authors now. Good work Apple!
post #34 of 93
Got to tell you, I am not happy with Apple requiring Lion for this app.

Snow Leopard came out in 2009.

A little under 3 years and major new app doesn't support it.


At some point this gets a little ridiculous, does it not?
post #35 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

If you are just a reader you can use an iDevice, but if you are an author you need both a Mac and iPad for creation and testing. If fact, Apple is going out of their way to require an iPad by offering a Preview option in IBooks Author that will check for connected iPads with iBooks open so it can push the book for testing. I don't understand why they would go to this much trouble than just allowing iBooks to be viewable in Mac OS X.

Apple wants the iPad to be ubiquitous in education, especially k-12. By not creating an iBook reader for Mac, they put pressure on school boards to adopt only iPads instead of an option of MacBooks or iPads.

A MacBook is essentially just a PC. If Macs could read iBooks, school boards would ask Apple to make a Windows version of iBooks for students who already have a Windows PC and did not want to buy an extra device just for school. Keeping it only iPad is much less problematic from a bureaucratic perspective. Since Apple already has clear dominance in the tablet market, there is no toehold for competing tablets to enter the education market.

Because iBooks is only available on iPad, authors need to have the ability to preview their work on the actual delivery platform.

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post #36 of 93
I have been using iBooks Author for the past hour or so creating an installation document for work. It is amazing. It is so easy to create books.

My book is incredibly simple and not interactive but even if I wanted to create one it is so easy to do.

I just imported a chapter from Pages of the version I was creating and it imported perfectly. There is a need for some tweaking as the pages document was pretty much a blank document.

What do I think is needed for this application though? My only gripe would be no blank document templates. You could create one I suppose but that would require effort. It would be nice simply to just have a purely blank template.

At the moment though that is my only gripe. I don't need to import existing ePUB files, importing PDF is NEVER as straight forward as people make it out (try importing to Word and Pages and tell me how you get on) so PDF importing is a dumb idea anyway.

I haven't tried Preview to iPad yet because my wife has that at the moment but that seems cool. PDF exports work well but I can't find a way to remove the Apple logo and the iBooks Author footer.

All in all I am stocked by this application. I truly am blown away by how good this is for a 1.0 version.
post #37 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldenclaw View Post

Got to tell you, I am not happy with Apple requiring Lion for this app.

Snow Leopard came out in 2009.

A little under 3 years and major new app doesn't support it.


At some point this gets a little ridiculous, does it not?

No. What is ridiculous is the amount of people not wanting to upgrade.

I admit there is a need for old software that doesn't run on Lion but if that was me I would ditch the old software and get something that does work for me and on Lion.

Lion is streaks ahead of Snow Leopard and it makes sense that Apple would only develop for Lion because they want everyone to move on.

Snow Leopard is as you say a little under 3 years old now. The world has moved a lot since three years ago.
post #38 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

... iBook Creator ... is just Pages with some tweaks, after all (isn't it?). ...

Not really. It's not very much like Pages at all.

It's very very similar to iWeb though.

I wouldn't be surprised if (as folks have already said), it's a re-using of the iWeb code base.
post #39 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirozha View Post

... Here's the problem - I cannot open any ePub books in iBooks Author. So, my hopes that iBooks Author would not only allow one to publish eBooks, but also read non-DRM ePub books ,as well as Apple DRM ePub books purchased in iBooks store, have been dashed. ... So, to me, this tool has a very limited functionality...

So, the tool has "limited functionality" because it won't do something it's expressly not even designed to do? That's rich.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sirozha View Post

... I cannot see why this application cannot read ePub books or export your own writing into the non-DRM'ed ePub format. ...

Wild guess here but ... maybe you can't read books in it because it's not actually a book reading application?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sirozha View Post

... the import from MS Word did not preserve all the formatting. So, this functionality may be useful with files created in Pages but is questionable with files created in MS Word ...

Anyone actually involved in eBook content creation (with any talent or knowledge that is), would know that you do not, EVER, import text from Microsoft Word with the formatting intact. To do so is to almost guarantee problems with the final document.

To create eBooks or do any kind of professional publishing, you import plain text only, and then apply the formatting from within the publishing program. This is really the entire point of the publishing program and it's main purpose.

It has always been this way and those that ignore this are the ones responsible for all the screwed up formatting in published documents around the world. You don't import proprietary formatting (especially Microsoft formatting junk), from one program into another. This is just common sense.
post #40 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Anyone actually involved in eBook content creation (with any talent or knowledge that is), would know that you do not, EVER, import text from Microsoft Word with the formatting intact.

Anyone involved in opening any Word document with any application other than the exact same version of Word on that exact same OS would know that you do not EVER import text from Microsoft Word and EXPECT the formatting to REMAIN intact.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
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