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New RIM CEO will not change strategy on PlayBook, BlackBerry 10

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
Despite the fact that it has a new CEO at the helm, Research in Motion will not see a major shakeup in the near future, and will continue to support the PlayBook tablet and the BlackBerry 10 platform as previously planned.

RIM Chief Executive Thorsten Heins joined the company's chairman of the board, Barb Stymiest, in a conference call with investors on Monday morning. It was the first chance for investors to hear from RIM's new CEO, who took over on Sunday after co-CEOs Mike Lazaridis and Jim Balsillie resigned.

Heins told analysts and investors that he is not pursuing strategic options for RIM like a sale of the company or a split. He also indicated he is focused on RIM's current strategy, which involves the struggling PlayBook, a tablet that cost the company $485 million from unsold inventory last year.

Analyst Mike Abramsky with RBC Capital Markets said Heins seemed upbeat and optimistic about his new role at RIM. But he also said that RIM's recent struggles have been a result of "process execution" and marketing, as opposed to product innovation.

In addition to putting his support behind the PlayBook, Heins also said he stands by BlackBerry 10, RIM's forthcoming mobile operating system update. Smartphones running BlackBerry 10 are expected to arrive in the second half of calendar 2012, a date some industry watchers believe may be too little, too late.

Abramsky noted that Heins did not indicate how he intends to address RIM's challenges in the consumer market, although the call was kept short. He believes that the "entrenched stance" shown by Heins could disappoint some investors who were hoping to see more drastic changes at RIM.




Separately, Charlie Wolf with Needham & Company said he believes the changes at RIM are "more cosmetic than substantive." He noted that Lazaridis will remain vice-chairman of the board at RIM while Balsillie will continue as a board member, though not in an active role at the company.

"RIM's last hope for returning to relevancy is BlackBerry 10," Wolf wrote in a note to investors. "If that platform is not successful, RIM's days could be numbered although BlackBerry continues to have a devoted following in the enterprise market and among the younger crowd in emerging markets."

If RIM does stay the course with its current strategy, it would be a very different approach than Nokia, which chose to abandon its struggling Symbian platform when new CEO Stephen Elop took the helm. In an internal memo, Elop referred to Symbian as a "burning platform" that Nokia needed to abandon in order to survive. Elop, a former Microsoft executive, guided Nokia from its own proprietary Symbian platform to Microsoft's Windows Phone, a transition that remains underway.
post #2 of 46
Remind me again, what's the definition of 'Insanity"?

I have no sympathy for the executives who made bad decisions, and have essentially put RIM on the 2012 Deathwatch. However, I do feel sorry for the hundreds/thousands of engineers, programmers and other people who stand to lose their employment, thanks to the decisions made by these same executives.

Those who do their job, are punished. Those who created the problem, not only keep their jobs, but also get a bonus for the cost-cutting they 'create' by terminating thousands of employees.
post #3 of 46
Does "will not change strategy" mean "continue to refuse to allow people to use a concept as basic as e-mail on their tablet without buying one of our phones, too"?
post #4 of 46
The new CEO: Mr Sock Puppet
post #5 of 46
In related news, Dead Horse Flogging seen overtaking Ice Hockey as Canada's National Pastime...
post #6 of 46
In an interview this patsy said

"as we move decisive into execution mode" yeah executing the break up and firesale of RIM, whenever a CEO starts mouthing garbage like this, you know its time to run like hell.

it really mean " I have no clue what I'm doing but it sounds like I do, and I know how to say all the right things - God I hope I can con someone to buy this pig soon"

"hey mate, I got this great new phone for you, real bargain, c'mon 10c a dozen, no R&D or Dev costs, ready to go, I'll even throw in a manufacturing plant "


Basically this shrub is the manager charged with getting as much money for the biggest shareholders as he can and reducing their losses, how much is he getting paid to do this? Which company will RIM be bought by?

Any guesses?


Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Despite the fact that it has a new CEO at the helm, Research in Motion will not see a major shakeup in the near future, and will continue to support the PlayBook tablet and the BlackBerry 10 platform as previously planned.

RIM Chief Executive Thorsten Heins joined the company's chairman of the board, Barb Stymiest, in a conference call with investors on Monday morning. It was the first chance for investors to hear from RIM's new CEO, who took over on Sunday after co-CEOs Mike Lazaridis and Jim Balsillie resigned.

Heins told analysts and investors that he is not pursuing strategic options for RIM like a sale of the company or a split. He also indicated he is focused on RIM's current strategy, which involves the struggling PlayBook, a tablet that cost the company $485 million from unsold inventory last year.

Analyst Mike Abramsky with RBC Capital Markets said Heins seemed upbeat and optimistic about his new role at RIM. But he also said that RIM's recent struggles have been a result of "process execution" and marketing, as opposed to product innovation.

In addition to putting his support behind the PlayBook, Heins also said he stands by BlackBerry 10, RIM's forthcoming mobile operating system update. Smartphones running BlackBerry 10 are expected to arrive in the second half of calendar 2012, a date some industry watchers believe may be too little, too late.

Abramsky noted that Heins did not indicate how he intends to address RIM's challenges in the consumer market, although the call was kept short. He believes that the "entrenched stance" shown by Heins could disappoint some investors who were hoping to see more drastic changes at RIM.




Separately, Charlie Wolf with Needham & Company said he believes the changes at RIM are "more cosmetic than substantive." He noted that Lazaridis will remain vice-chairman of the board at RIM while Balsillie will continue as a board member, though not in an active role at the company.

"RIM's last hope for returning to relevancy is BlackBerry 10," Wolf wrote in a note to investors. "If that platform is not successful, RIM's days could be numbered although BlackBerry continues to have a devoted following in the enterprise market and among the younger crowd in emerging markets."

If RIM does stay the course with its current strategy, it would be a very different approach than Nokia, which chose to abandon its struggling Symbian platform when new CEO Stephen Elop took the helm. In an internal memo, Elop referred to Symbian as a "burning platform" that Nokia needed to abandon in order to survive. Elop, a former Microsoft executive, guided Nokia from its own proprietary Symbian platform to Microsoft's Windows Phone, a transition that remains underway.

Originally by Rickers - 2014 : Cook & will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost so long.


History reduce Apple Watch.... to a footnote in the annals of technology - Benjamin Frost Dec 2014



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Originally by Rickers - 2014 : Cook & will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost so long.


History reduce Apple Watch.... to a footnote in the annals of technology - Benjamin Frost Dec 2014



Reply
post #7 of 46
Shoals & reefs sighted. Full speed ahead.
post #8 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul94544 View Post

In an interview this patsy said

"as we move decisive into execution mode" yeah executing the break up and firesale of RIM

it really mean " I have no clue what I'm doing but it sounds like I do, and I know how to say all the right things - God I hope I can con someone to buy this pig soon"

"hey mate, I got this great new phone for you, real bargain, c'mon 10c a dozen, no R&D or Dev costs, ready to go, I'll even throw in a manufacturing plant "


Basically this shrub is the manager charged with getting as much money for the biggest shareholders as he can, how much is he getting paid to do this? Which company will RIM be bought by?

Any guesses?

Well here's my take in this post on the previous announcement thread re: RIM .

Don't be surprised if in the next few months there will be multiple-million $$ orders for new equipment... supplied by Siemens.... and any new products "possibly" coming to T-mobile first and at a better bargains than elsewhere. Been in the same room where all these "decision makers" are best "Butties".
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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post #9 of 46

When discussing the possibility that the Titanic may encounter ice that night, J. Bruce Ismay remarked -- perhaps jokingly -- "We shall increase speed so as to get clear of the danger as quickly as possible."

Different CEO, similar strategic plan.
post #10 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

Well here's my take in this post on the previous announcement thread re: RIM .

Don't be surprised if in the next few months there will be multiple-million $$ orders for new equipment... supplied by Siemens.... and any new products "possibly" coming to T-mobile first and at a better bargains than elsewhere. Been in the same room where all these "decision makers" are best "Butties".

In a perverse way, there might be a few chances to make some quick money on this stock buying on the dips and some put options as the pundits and their cronies start talking up the share price in advance of a deal

Originally by Rickers - 2014 : Cook & will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost so long.


History reduce Apple Watch.... to a footnote in the annals of technology - Benjamin Frost Dec 2014



Reply

Originally by Rickers - 2014 : Cook & will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost so long.


History reduce Apple Watch.... to a footnote in the annals of technology - Benjamin Frost Dec 2014



Reply
post #11 of 46
g, g ceeeeeee
g, c eeeeee
g, c eee, g,c eee, g,c eeeee
c, e geeeeee
e, c geeeeee
g, g ceeeeee

Musical joke, about a 'Taps' interface.
post #12 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

[...] But he also said that RIM's recent struggles have been a result of "process execution" and marketing, as opposed to product innovation. [...]

It doesn't matter how well RIM executes their current plan, and it doesn't matter how well they market it.

I give them 6 more months before bankruptcy and/or being sold to a larger company for their patent portfolio.

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post #13 of 46
so RIM is officially dead. Blackberry is even worse than Windows Phone, if that is possible. Next up for the fail boat....Nokia. LOL at how Nokia is bragging about selling around one million phones in three months when Android and Apple devices do that in less than two days.
post #14 of 46
duplicate
Hmmmmmm...
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Hmmmmmm...
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post #15 of 46
I don't know why you guys are criticizing RIM's winning strategy so harshly when it's obvious that investors are endorsing it enthusiastically in the markets today...

[/s]
Hmmmmmm...
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Hmmmmmm...
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post #16 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

g, g ceeeeeee
g, c eeeeee
g, c eee, g,c eee, g,c eeeee
c, e geeeeee
e, c geeeeee
g, g ceeeeee

Musical joke, about a 'Taps' interface.



after the last C, glissando down about 4 octaves to a sample of a toilet flushing
post #17 of 46
We should all remember that there was a time when Apple was on its way out too. It took the return of SJ to turn things around. Remember the story of people finding Michael Spindler hiding under his desk when he was CEO of Apple? Fine, don't have sympathy for the bad decisions made by management but these guys all have their golden parachutes and will be just fine. It's the RIM rank and file employees I feel sorry for. They will lose their jobs if/when RIM tanks because the (in this case) founders can't deal with the reality of the current mobile world. Like so many others RIM laughed when the iPhone came out. They had no clue what titanic shifts in the market were unleashed at the time. Just like the executives at Xerox had no clue what they had in the PARC labs and what it would mean to the PC business. If they did we would be using Xerox branded Macs today.
post #18 of 46
Sounds like RIM's new CEO is taking the opposite approach (change nothing) when compared to what Steve Jobs did when he joined a near-bankrupt Apple (change everything).

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post #19 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul94544 View Post

In a perverse way, there might be a few chances to make some quick money on this stock buying on the dips and some put options as the pundits and their cronies start talking up the share price in advance of a deal

The Forums on AI are acting up seriously(!)... anyway...

Yes, I've done some "little" bets quite awhile back re: RIMM.

The markets don't seem to be as optimistic as Herr Heins... RIMM down ~6,5%... but still up from a low of 12.00. Sure hope no one held on from a year ago when RIMM was at 71.00!!!!

This is a pretty good article: Denial is not a Turnaround Strategy
Quote:
If you took the statements of new Research in Motion (NSDQ: RIMM) CEO Thorsten Heins this morning at face value, you might walk away thinking the companys many problems stem from confused marketing and poor execution. They dont: its all about the product, stupid, and thats why the investors who clamored for RIM to name a new CEO are not impressed with the early returns.
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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post #20 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

We should all remember that there was a time when Apple was on its way out too. It took the return of SJ to turn things around. Remember the story of people finding Michael Spindler hiding under his desk when he was CEO of Apple? Fine, don't have sympathy for the bad decisions made by management but these guys all have their golden parachutes and will be just fine. It's the RIM rank and file employees I feel sorry for. They will lose their jobs if/when RIM tanks because the (in this case) founders can't deal with the reality of the current mobile world. Like so many others RIM laughed when the iPhone came out. They had no clue what titanic shifts in the market were unleashed at the time. Just like the executives at Xerox had no clue what they had in the PARC labs and what it would mean to the PC business. If they did we would be using Xerox branded Macs today.

I think RIM's major undoing was to sink a ton of its resources into developing the Playbook. had they fixed the core product then they might have had a fighting chance.

Now RIM has done an early 90s Apple trick and hired the CEO from within the ranks. This imo is the last nail in the coffin and Heins is about to pound it into place.
Hmmmmmm...
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Hmmmmmm...
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post #21 of 46
Quote:
In what seemed like a testy interview with Toronto’s Globe and Mail, Heins scoffed at the notion that RIM needed change.

Change to what? Change for what? I mean, what’s the objective of a change? We’ve made a lot of changes in the past 18 months. … We didn’t stand still in the last 18 months, we did our homework. And I think we will complete our homework soon.

Well he's just being himself.

From the article posted above re: Denial...
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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post #22 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

Like so many others RIM laughed when the iPhone came out. They had no clue what titanic shifts in the market were unleashed at the time.

From what I read RIM was in disbelief:

"RIM had a complete internal panic when Apple unveiled the iPhone in 2007, a former employee revealed this weekend. The BlackBerry maker is now known to have held multiple all-hands meetings on January 10 that year, a day after the iPhone was on stage, and to have made outlandish claims about its features. Apple was effectively accused of lying as it was supposedly impossible that a device could have such a large touchscreen but still get a usable lifespan away from a power outlet.

The iPhone "couldn't do what [Apple was] demonstrating without an insanely power hungry processor, it must have terrible battery life," Shacknews poster Kentor heard from his former colleagues of the time. "Imagine their surprise [at RIM] when they disassembled an iPhone for the first time and found that the phone was battery with a tiny logic board strapped to it."

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post #23 of 46
Hey AI Mods:

You got any hosting/file sharing stuff going on we simple posters don't know about?... or on the wrong side of SOPA?...

Because the forum server appears to be on the wrong end of a MU-TD or a DoS attack... just sayin'.
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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post #24 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dpackman View Post

Shoals & reefs sighted. Full speed ahead.


We'll just get a little closer to shore so we can wave.....
post #25 of 46
So RIMM final shed Dumb and Dumber. Now their market department can release their latest slogan.

"Life is Tough, it's even tougher when you're stupid!" Keep up the good work team.
post #26 of 46
If Symbian is a burning platform, then Windows Mobile is a sunken shipwreck. No doubt Microsoft have compensated Elop very well for the move.
Mac user since August 1983.
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Mac user since August 1983.
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post #27 of 46
Quote:
Despite the fact that it has a new CEO at the helm, Research in Motion will not see a major shakeup in the near future, and will continue to support the PlayBook tablet and the BlackBerry 10 platform as previously planned.

Here Ya' Go...
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post #28 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

From what I read RIM was in disbelief:

"RIM had a complete internal panic when Apple unveiled the iPhone in 2007, a former employee revealed this weekend. The BlackBerry maker is now known to have held multiple all-hands meetings on January 10 that year, a day after the iPhone was on stage, and to have made outlandish claims about its features. Apple was effectively accused of lying as it was supposedly impossible that a device could have such a large touchscreen but still get a usable lifespan away from a power outlet.

The iPhone "couldn't do what [Apple was] demonstrating without an insanely power hungry processor, it must have terrible battery life," Shacknews poster Kentor heard from his former colleagues of the time. "Imagine their surprise [at RIM] when they disassembled an iPhone for the first time and found that the phone was battery with a tiny logic board strapped to it."


That's the difference between RIM (and others), and Apple.

RIM, "we can't do it". >Sigh< It does not get done.

Apple, "We can't do it"...

SJ, "Yes we can"! And they do,,,,,,
post #29 of 46
So...

They've transitioned from Balsy and Lazy to Stymy and Hiney... that's just sillie.

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post #30 of 46
It's even more sad that RiM is failing so miserably yet it's still been one of the few profitable handset vendors since the iPhone's debut. In December 2011 (pre-holiday quarter )they reported $265 million in net profit. That's down 71% YoY but that's still good compared to everyone since they were still profitable. Unfortunately they have nothing else viable to prop up their company so I don't much opportunity for them to get out of this in the time they'd likely need.

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post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post






Ahhhh! Just looking at this beauty makes me cry!

Now seriously, can anybody explain to me, how sticking to the given RIM-strategys could possibly prevent RIM from bankruptcy in the near future?
post #32 of 46
Dulicate?
post #33 of 46
Surely the problem isn't so much with the strategy, but the fact that they will be so late in executing it. BlackBerry 10 and the PlayBook have been moderately well received and most commentators have said that RIM are heading in the right direction as far as the products are concerned - they just should have had them on the market at least a year ago.

But, let's face it, they haven't, so what do you want them to do now? Dump this new platform which is considered to be a viable way forward in favour of what? Or simply give up and sell themselves to some other company?

I can entirely understand why neither of these options is any more appealing than the one they have decided to stick with.

Anyone else have any bright ideas? I don't hear any being thrown into the ring, just people caviling because the new CEO says they are sticking to their current strategy, which is the least worthwhile form of criticism imaginable.

They are definitely in a cr*p position, but it seems to me that sticking to their current strategy is the least worst option. Unless you can come up with a constructively better option then it's pointless jerking off to criticise them for it.
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post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

It's even more sad that RiM is failing so miserably yet it's still been one of the few profitable handset vendors since the iPhone's debut. In December 2011 (pre-holiday quarter )they reported $265 million in net profit. That's down 71% YoY but that's still good compared to everyone since they were still profitable. Unfortunately they have nothing else viable to prop up their company so I don't much opportunity for them to get out of this in the time they'd likely need.

The Titanic was still dry and comfortable soon after hitting an iceberg. But its bleak future was pretty clear.

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post #35 of 46
My former Canadian partner was constantly having problems with his BB - their first iteration with a touch screen, but he still supported them. I can understand that - they created something no one else had at the time and they really were top of the game for years. The problem is they didn't recognize that other companies were going to catch up and quickly pass them.

You hate to say it, but they were a one-trick pony. They lived and are dying by their mobile email service - kind of just like AOL did on the home internet access front. They led, now it can't even be said that they are following, because they're not.

Or going back further - and the thing that RIM really crushed when they first came to market is the pager and all those once popular pager companies. Clearly they are still around, but they're existing on legacy systems for places like hospitals, making assumptions that places like this are not wired into any of several networks. Doctors should be not just getting pages to inform them of patient condition, but rather should be getting mobile updates with charts, X-rays, stats real-time on their iPhone or iPad. At least this is where things are heading.

RIM should be punished, or the former co-ceo's should be punished at least. I'm sure there are bright, forward thinking people who work there - but their culture of arrogance has squashed their ability to move beyond their single relevant product.
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jingo View Post

Surely the problem isn't so much with the strategy, but the fact that they will be so late in executing it. BlackBerry 10 and the PlayBook have been moderately well received and most commentators have said that RIM are heading in the right direction as far as the products are concerned - they just should have had them on the market at least a year ago.

But, let's face it, they haven't, so what do you want them to do now? Dump this new platform which is considered to be a viable way forward in favour of what? Or simply give up and sell themselves to some other company?

I can entirely understand why neither of these options is any more appealing than the one they have decided to stick with.

Anyone else have any bright ideas? I don't hear any being thrown into the ring, just people caviling because the new CEO says they are sticking to their current strategy, which is the least worthwhile form of criticism imaginable.

They are definitely in a cr*p position, but it seems to me that sticking to their current strategy is the least worst option. Unless you can come up with a constructively better option then it's pointless jerking off to criticise them for it.

I agree that we all, myself included, find it easier to point out the problems than come up with a viable positive solution. The problem is this, for me at least - RIM has been "staying the course" for the past few years and as much as their new OS has promised relevancy when it releases, they've not been able to hit release dates for just about anything, hardware or software related.

If you're a share holder and you hear that they're sticking to plan, the next question had better be - is this a plan that can be executed on within what timeframe? 4th quarter is long way away for new phones with a new os - and that's assuming they're that close - something I highly, highly, doubt.

It will be interesting to see how things play out. My bet is that they'll miss launch dates for both playbook and new phones / os. They'll be given through the end of the year by the BB using financial sector because they have to give them the time given the dolts on the Street don't want to be proven even more wrong right now. I see lots of people losing lots of money with RIM - which has already happened, but will only get worse.
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jingo View Post

Surely the problem isn't so much with the strategy, but the fact that they will be so late in executing it. BlackBerry 10 and the PlayBook have been moderately well received and most commentators have said that RIM are heading in the right direction as far as the products are concerned - they just should have had them on the market at least a year ago.

But, let's face it, they haven't, so what do you want them to do now? Dump this new platform which is considered to be a viable way forward in favour of what? Or simply give up and sell themselves to some other company?

I can entirely understand why neither of these options is any more appealing than the one they have decided to stick with.

Anyone else have any bright ideas? I don't hear any being thrown into the ring, just people caviling because the new CEO says they are sticking to their current strategy, which is the least worthwhile form of criticism imaginable.

They are definitely in a cr*p position, but it seems to me that sticking to their current strategy is the least worst option. Unless you can come up with a constructively better option then it's pointless jerking off to criticise them for it.

To quote Michael Dell: "Shut the company down and return what is left to the shareholders before there is nothing left to return."

Not that I mean this as serious advice, no company would ever want to admit to failure that openly while there are still other options. And much more importantly, closing it down now would hurt a lot of third parties, like their employees and suppliers. Rather shrink first somewhat giving all those affected more time to look for an alternative. In a sense, keeping the company running could be considered a social plan for its employees, suppliers, landlords etc..

Selling the company would be somewhat more acceptable alternative to shutting down (even if we look at Palm it in the end meant shutting down as and those buying RIM might only keep some of its research and production resources).
post #38 of 46
They're dead.
post #39 of 46
Simple things like the little touchpad failing way too much for consumers will be what kills RIM.

No, we won't honor anything out of warranty. Who do you think we are, the Apple Store?
post #40 of 46
There's a three-word phrase used by many rigid, backward-thinking apparatchiks.

"Stay the course."

Those words have been uttered by many bureaucrats and politicians who didn't understand the present and were afraid of the future.

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