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Bill Gates discusses Steve Jobs, Apple's iBooks & the future of education

post #1 of 73
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In a new interview, Microsoft founder Bill Gates discusses conversations he would have with the late Steve Jobs, and also shares his thoughts on the future of education in the wake of Apple's iPad textbook announcement.

Gates sat down with Nightline's Bill Weir for an interview in which he talked about his philanthropy. Having given away a significant portion of his wealth, Gates is no longer the world's richest man.

Given his efforts to fight disease and poverty, Gates said the passing of Jobs late last year put some perspective on how fragile life can be. He said it was particularly strange to have someone as "vibrant" as Jobs die so young.

"It makes you feel like, 'Wow, we're getting old,'" Gates said. "Yet you look back and think about the great opportunities we had."

Still in good health, Gates said he hopes to live long enough to see some of his current projects become a reality. He noted that medicines the Gates Foundation have invested in, with grants totaling more than $26 billion since 1994, are 15-plus years out from hitting the market.

In particular, one of the projects he and his wife Melinda have worked hard on is the eradication of malaria. "I need a couple of decades here to fulfill that opportunity," he joked.

Gates also spoke about the one-on-one conversations he would have with Jobs. The former Microsoft chief executive said that while he and Jobs had very different skill sets, Jobs was "every bit as intense" as himself.



"He and I always enjoyed talking," Gates said of Jobs. "He would throw some things out, some stimulating things, we'd talk about the other companies that had come along. We'd talk about our families and how lucky we had been in terms of the women we had married. It was great, great relaxed conversation."

Weir also asked Gates about iBooks 2 for iPad and the digital textbook push Apple announced in a media event last week. While Gates didn't specifically comment on Apple's initiatives, he did say that there is a great deal of opportunity for improving the education system in America through technology, given that it hasn't seen much improvement in the last 30 years.

"The idea of having personalized learning is now enabled by a lot of innovation on the Internet," he said. "Having good classes, having the teacher be able to look at where their students stand -- we're going to have technology on our side. It's early days."
post #2 of 73
Sounds like tech billionaires have much in common. Makes me wonder what kinds of conversations Steve Ballmer had with Steve Jobs.

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post #3 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Sounds like tech billionaires have much in common. Makes me wonder what kinds of conversations Steve Ballmer had with Steve Jobs.

Well, sounds like tech visionaries have much in common; and while BillG, even though thinking different from SteveJ, certainly qualifies as one, I'd have a hard time thinking the same way about Ballmer. Sure, rich he is and exec qualities come with him, but I wouldn't think from the presentations I have seen on his side that there is much to be expected from him on the change-the-world aspect of things. So unless this changes big time, I think we could spare that part.

-- Fl.
post #4 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Sounds like tech billionaires have much in common.

Too bad Jobs never got a chance to enjoy his billions since he was working everyday. Bill on the other hand is retired and probably is enjoying every minute of it.

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post #5 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Too bad Jobs never got a chance to enjoy his billions since he was working everyday. Bill on the other hand is retired and probably is enjoying every minute of it.

Well, if I had his vision and position and possibilities, I would certainly be relaxed because I wouldn't ever have to worry about money and paying bills and stuff (thus saving a lot of my time), but I'd never swap the excitement of *this* job in *this* company with a retirement based on simply spending case. I'm totally with Steve on where he found his greatest joys. Now... looking at the big, complex heap of stuff with very little through-and-through beauty that is Microsoft, I can see how one would leave the place behind and do other things with that level of freedom. :-)

Fl
post #6 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Too bad Jobs never got a chance to enjoy his billions since he was working everyday. Bill on the other hand is retired and probably is enjoying every minute of it.

I think working is what Steve Jobs enjoyed.
post #7 of 73
Quote:
While Jobs didn't specifically comment on Apple's initiatives, he did say that there is a great deal of opportunity for improving the education system in America through technology...

I think you meant "While GATES"...
post #8 of 73
Sounds like Bill Weir forgot to wear a microphone

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post #9 of 73
Bill philanthropy work is great. I respect that he is one of the few rich people who understand that they won't take the money with them into the grave.

But.

Bill stole this money from us, the consumer. MSFT have been guilty for many illegal things to make their monopoly on the PC market. MSFT is a fun company that never have succeeded at anything that they have competition on. Still today 94% of their profit is from Windows and Office.

People who work with IT knows how it is to deal with MSFT and their Select Agreement.

Home users: If I want to buy a PC from any company beside Apple, I am forced to use Windows. But windows users are so uneducated that they believe that they have an "open" platform and Appel is a "closed" platform.
Apple follows open standards like HTML5, H264 and OpenGL. MSFT uses their non standard HTML browser, WMV, Silverlight and DirectX. If you are a gamer you are forced to use MSFT since they have DirectX. But the users believe that they are free to choose since its an open standard.

Isn't it strange that Windows Ultimate costs 300 dollars and OSX ultimate costs 29 dollar? MSFT Office costs 300-500 dollars and Pages/Keynote/Numbers cost 10 dollar each?

For most companies its cheaper to buy an iPad + Apple office, then buying MSFT Office.

So.. Great that Bill gives money, but he is a thief.
post #10 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Sounds like tech billionaires have much in common. Makes me wonder what kinds of conversations Steve Ballmer had with Steve Jobs.

Balle-mer is a genius.
Apple invent IPhone. Google clones it. MSFT creates its protection racket. Today almost all Android vendors pays the MSFT protection fee 5-15 dollar per device.

MSFT would not be the big company its today without Balle-mer. The reason why MSFT are big is that they manage to license DOS to IBM. The funny thing was that Balle-mer sold Dos before MSFT had it. After the IBM deal MSFT went out and bought Quick and dirty DOS and the worlds largest software company was created.
post #11 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by florianvk View Post

Well, sounds like tech visionaries have much in common; and while BillG, even though thinking different from SteveJ, certainly qualifies as one, I'd have a hard time thinking the same way about Ballmer. Sure, rich he is and exec qualities come with him, but I wouldn't think from the presentations I have seen on his side that there is much to be expected from him on the change-the-world aspect of things. So unless this changes big time, I think we could spare that part. ...

I strongly disagree that Gates qualifies as "visionary" of any kind and I think there is a mountain of evidence to support that view.

Agree about Balmer though. He is practically the textbook example of what used to be called a "dullard." The man has zero imagination and is entertained by things like sports and dancing girls not intellectual or artistic pursuits.

If he hadn't been dragged along by his friendship to Gates, he'd probably be a refrigerator repair man or a delivery guy or something.
post #12 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Sounds like tech billionaires have much in common. Makes me wonder what kinds of conversations Steve Ballmer had with Steve Jobs.

I expect Balmer to say "ee ee ooh ooh ahh ahh, unga bunga"
post #13 of 73
Who had less tact in that interview, the interviewer or Gates?
post #14 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

He is practically the textbook example of what used to be called a "dullard." The man has zero imagination and is entertained by things like sports and dancing girls not intellectual or artistic pursuits.

I do not believe that being entertained by sports and dancing girls equals being a dullard.

I'm not his publicist nor his apologist, but geez, he graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University - he only appears to be an idiot. BTW, the article is about Bill Gates.
post #15 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Sounds like tech billionaires have much in common. Makes me wonder what kinds of conversations Steve Ballmer had with Steve Jobs.

Steve Jobs: 'Boy, Steve. You sure screwed up Bill's baby.'

Steve Ballmer: 'My cat's breath smells like cat food.'
post #16 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by PowerMach View Post

I do not believe that being entertained by sports and dancing girls equals being a dullard. ...

I wasn't clear. I just meant that if one is not interested in anything else as well, then you one would be a dullard. Not that liking those things alone made someone a dullard.

A dullard is someone who has no "life of the mind" and wallows in sensorial experience alone.
post #17 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by shompa View Post


Bill stole this money from us, the consumer. MSFT have been guilty for many illegal things to make their monopoly on the PC market. MSFT is a fun company that never have succeeded at anything that they have competition on. Still today 94% of their profit is from Windows and Office.

People who work with IT knows how it is to deal with MSFT and their Select Agreement.

Home users: If I want to buy a PC from any company beside Apple, I am forced to use Windows. But windows users are so uneducated that they believe that they have an "open" platform and Appel is a "closed" platform.
Apple follows open standards like HTML5, H264 and OpenGL. MSFT uses their non standard HTML browser, WMV, Silverlight and DirectX. If you are a gamer you are forced to use MSFT since they have DirectX. But the users believe that they are free to choose since its an open standard.

Isn't it strange that Windows Ultimate costs 300 dollars and OSX ultimate costs 29 dollar? MSFT Office costs 300-500 dollars and Pages/Keynote/Numbers cost 10 dollar each?

For most companies its cheaper to buy an iPad + Apple office, then buying MSFT Office.

So.. Great that Bill gives money, but he is a thief.

No one forced you to buy a PC or to use Windows. People actually make choice and some people do not care! As long as they can get on the web and Facebook is all that matters.

Apple hardware is actually very closed and I think its a good thing. We don't have to deal with wacky compatibility issues. ATX is great if you like to build and tinker with custom hardware components. Your not going to get any more open than a ATX PC.

Try doing anything like Windows Rights Management on Apple Mail or convince an financial analyst to use Numbers. They will just laugh at you.

I agree with you, the computing power of an iPad meets many office users needs.

ON many front Bill Gates lacked innovative thinking and imagination but he is is one of the greatest technologist and philanthropist of our time.
post #18 of 73
He was very tactful not too say much about the iBook initiative from what I read here, I haven't run the full interview yet. He could have slammed it and promoted whatever Microsoft intend to do to copy Apple as I'm sure Monkey Boy would have done.
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post #19 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by PowerMach View Post

I do not believe that being entertained by sports and dancing girls equals being a dullard.

I'm not his publicist nor his apologist, but geez, he graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University - he only appears to be an idiot. BTW, the article is about Bill Gates.

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post #20 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I wasn't clear. I just meant that if one is not interested in anything else as well, then you one would be a dullard. Not that liking those things alone made someone a dullard.

A dullard is someone who has no "life of the mind" and wallows in sensorial experience alone.

Your clarification clearly clarifies. All is well. Thanks.
post #21 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Sounds like tech billionaires have much in common. Makes me wonder what kinds of conversations Steve Ballmer had with Steve Jobs.

I feel that changing the world is what Steve Jobs enjoyed.
post #22 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by shompa View Post

If you are a gamer you are forced to use MSFT since they have DirectX. But the users believe that they are free to choose since its an open standard.

It's not Microsoft's fault that Apple abandoned the game market. And Apple hasn't really shown signs that it's making any real attempts to win that crowd back either, with the only affordable Macs not having user-upgradeable components. Apple occasionally makes minimal attempts to act like they're connected to the gaming crowd, but that commitment doesn't last long beyond the keynote speech.

Quote:
Isn't it strange that Windows Ultimate costs 300 dollars and OSX ultimate costs 29 dollar? MSFT Office costs 300-500 dollars and Pages/Keynote/Numbers cost 10 dollar each?

Considering that Microsoft is a software company and Apple is a hardware company, no it's not strange. Besides perhaps Keynote, Apple's office programs in no compare to the power of Microsoft's applications. Further, that $300 usually gets you more than just 3 programs such as Outlook, OneNote, Access, etc.

Apple writes software to support their hardware. They've already got a good chunk of change from you through your hardware purchase (Mac, iPad, iPhone) that getting another $29 for an OS upgrade is just gravy.

Quote:
For most companies its cheaper to buy an iPad + Apple office, then buying MSFT Office.

Let's see, if you're saying MS Office costs $300-500, then any way you cut it, that would be cheaper than the $499 minimum iPad cost + $30 Apple office apps. So how is Apple cheaper?

Quote:
So.. Great that Bill gives money, but he is a thief.

Thanks for being blinded by either Apple fanboyism or hatred for Microsoft.
post #23 of 73
I would talk for hours, days, weeks(!) about how much Microsoft was a company dishonest, screwing the industry, computers enthusiasts and consumers all together (yes!) and Bill Gates never was the passionate and vibrant person as Steve Jobs.

Still, Ballmer I can't respect, Bill Gates, I'm forced to respect him for his acts. He talks and acts a lot for his philanthropy.

Maybe he atones for microsoft, some would say, but in the end, it was not so bad (it was just software). No, I think Bill Gates is sincere, and he uses all the money and past works he got to do good things because it is really who he is.

Bill Gates the computer geek in microsoft was not the real Bill Gates. it was just his incredibly successful job.

And still don't forget, he was quite skillful to manage Microsoft, with Ballmer's help, yes. Without Gates, Ballmer is loosing Microsoft.


-
For Steve Jobs Apple, NeXT and Pixar was him, it was all who he was. His work is what defined Jobs. He put in it his own personality, his dream, his will and would have worked to the last day for it if it was possible.

You can't think of Steve Jobs without Apple. You can think of Bill Gates for something else than Microsoft.

And maybe it's a good thing for Gates.
post #24 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

Thanks for being blinded by either Apple fanboyism or hatred for Microsoft.

for any geeks/computers enthusiast from the 80s/90s, it's very hard to forgot the hate for Microsoft

very hard, I assure you.

I'm joking but it's like I have sometimes to take pills to not hate MS for 80s old stuff...

there are so many stories, so many, too much. so many wasted opportunities for greater products and better computers because of Microsoft. You could write books and of course many books was made about these years.

So please, understand old geezers. Take that like old fantasy stories of an old time by traumatized ones, it will amuse you in a good way and it's also one reason why that industry is so fun : there are real passion, since many years.

The passion is still burning. you can think it's just blindness, but you will loose something.
post #25 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

Thanks for being blinded by either Apple fanboyism or hatred for Microsoft.

I take it you weren't around for the 80s or 90s, so I'll make the overarching statement that others are implying:

Windows would not exist without Microsoft's theft of software from Apple. Period.

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post #26 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by shompa View Post

Bill stole this money from us, the consumer.

Give me a break

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post #27 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBRSTREETG View Post

No one forced you to buy a PC or to use Windows. People actually make choice and some people do not care! As long as they can get on the web and Facebook is all that matters.

Absolutely not true, as you'll find out one day when you're grown up and have to go to work.
post #28 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by SailorPaul View Post

I feel that changing the world is what Steve Jobs enjoyed.

I agree and I suspect his personal beliefs had a lot to do with that, I am meaning spiritually. Being an atheist myself I do find his belief system worth reading more about, it seems to have made Steve an exceptional human being.
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post #29 of 73
The other thing to keep in mind about Bill Gates, he's also partially engaged in a legacy cleansing exercise. In his days running Microsoft he accumulated a lot of very unpleasant baggage in terms of his business practices. Now he's whitewashing that in the public eye.

Yes, now his name looks good. No one remembers Carnegie or Nobel as the nasty sorts they were either. All that's remembered now is what they did after they made their millions.

It doesn't mean what he's doing now is bad ... but one has to take into consideration where the money came from in the first place to have a complete picture of the person.
post #30 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obama View Post

Absolutely not true, as you'll find out one day when you're grown up and have to go to work.

Those days are changing fast, if you are forced to use a PC now I am truly sorry but many, many companies are seeing the light as IT either lose their stranglehold or embrace iOS which is leading to OS X getting a fresh look. There is an IT revolution going on folks
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post #31 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I take it you weren't around for the 80s or 90s, so I'll make the overarching statement that others are implying:

Windows would not exist without Microsoft's theft of software from Apple. Period.

I was around during the 80s and 90s. It's farcical to argue that Windows 3.1, which was the first commercially successful windows version, bore any resemblance to MacOS.

I assume most of us have read the Jobs biography. It's quite clear that theft and questionable ethics were practiced by all parties in the 80s, including Mr. Jobs.
post #32 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSmith View Post

The other thing to keep in mind about Bill Gates, he's also partially engaged in a legacy cleansing exercise. In his days running Microsoft he accumulated a lot of very unpleasant baggage in terms of his business practices. Now he's whitewashing that in the public eye.

Yes, now his name looks good. No one remembers Carnegie or Nobel as the nasty sorts they were either. All that's remembered now is what they did after they made their millions.

It doesn't mean what he's doing now is bad ... but one has to take into consideration where the money came from in the first place to have a complete picture of the person.

Never truer words said.

I always cringe at what Carnegie tried to do to the English language Here in the USA ... And partially succeeded ... And he a poorly educated Scot (albeit a very successful one)
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post #33 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by igxqrrl View Post

I was around during the 80s and 90s. It's farcical to argue that Windows 3.1, which was the first commercially successful windows version, bore any resemblance to MacOS.

I assume most of us have read the Jobs biography. It's quite clear that theft and questionable ethics were practiced by all parties in the 80s, including Mr. Jobs.

Cough cough ... You have to be joking right? Windows was literally based on a reverse engineering hack of the first Mac. In the possession of Microsoft while under contract to produce Steve Job's brain child, Mac Office. You know, Word, Multiplan aka Excel etc. So Gates' two great achievements were a stolen OS and Steve's Office. No wonder he gives a lot of money away.
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post #34 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Too bad Jobs never got a chance to enjoy his billions since he was working everyday. Bill on the other hand is retired and probably is enjoying every minute of it.

For Jobs, we could recall what island hermit is using for his signature these days:

"Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn't matter to me. Going to bed at night saying we've done something wonderful, that's what matters to me." - Steve Jobs

For Gates, I can't help feeling he is doing atonement for perpetrating on the world the mediocrity combined with rapacity that his company represents. Hats off for doing what he is doing, but he has also abandoned ship, and there are a lot of passengers and crew on the S.S. Microsoft.

Jobs would never have left his company adrift and taking on water -- to retire! -- for any reason, no matter how philanthropic.

Edit: anticipated by JSmith and digitalclips above, I see.
post #35 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obama View Post

Absolutely not true, as you'll find out one day when you're grown up and have to go to work.

Yeah, I hate to break this to you but Macs are used in the workplace also.
post #36 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Sounds like Bill Weir forgot to wear a microphone

the feed is stereo, Gates is on left speaker and Bill Weir is on right speaker.

Check your system.
post #37 of 73
Interesting that Bill still has to mention that Jobs was not an engineer. Fact is that many engineers do not automatically consider software developers to be real engineers
post #38 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Too bad Jobs never got a chance to enjoy his billions since he was working everyday. Bill on the other hand is retired and probably is enjoying every minute of it.

Actually, good old Bill is working quite hard. He is very active in his BMGF work. Very.
post #39 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by igxqrrl View Post

I was around during the 80s and 90s. It's farcical to argue that Windows 3.1, which was the first commercially successful windows version, bore any resemblance to MacOS.

I assume most of us have read the Jobs biography. It's quite clear that theft and questionable ethics were practiced by all parties in the 80s, including Mr. Jobs.

In the 80s? Questionable activities continue unabated, my friend. It's all a question of perspective.
post #40 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gustav View Post

I think working is what Steve Jobs enjoyed.

I agree completely. Steve Jobs lived a simply life in a middle-class neighborhood. He worked to the very end. Jobs died doing what he loved. I hope that the same can be said of me after I am gone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JSmith View Post

The other thing to keep in mind about Bill Gates, he's also partially engaged in a legacy cleansing exercise. ...

This is exactly correct. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation was founded in the shadow of the U. S. Government's antitrust trial of Microsoft. Gates needed to change the narrative. Of the work that I am aware of performed by the Foundation, I am in complete and total support of. I applaud Bill and Melinda for what appears to be sincere effort on their parts. Quite frankly, I wish that other millionaires and billionaires engaged in similar or supportive efforts. It is to his credit that Warren Buffett has done so. Still, it is difficult for me to give more than an intellectual recognition for William H. Gates, III's current good works. He did too much damage to too many people for me to give him unqualified praise now.
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