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Apple hires Dixons Retail CEO John Browett as new SVP of Retail - Page 2

post #41 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOROM View Post

Yeah, I can see the memo:

"Dear (name). You are scheduled for your New Hire Press Release photo on (date). We understand that most new hires come from a typical corporate culture, so this is a reminder to:

Not shave the morning of your photo appointment;
Drink heavily the night before (we want you to have that hard-working, saggy-eyed look);
Wear a day-old shirt half unbuttonned; and
Do NOT get a haircut.

Welcome to Apple!"

Think what you will. You're wrong, but think what you will.

Apple doesn't have a dress code. Doesn't seem to affect them in any way whatsoever.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #42 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOROM View Post

Wow, 5 o'clock shadow, dishevelled collar, wierd haircut. Looks like they found him in a bar.

Sorry, in a pub.

Er, Jony Ive has a shaved head and stubble. He certainly doesn't have the look of a SVP.
post #43 of 67
Waiting for everyone to thunder at Apple "poaching Dixons employee". I mean, if it's bad from Google, surely it's bad from Apple?

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #44 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Dishevelled collar, I mean, how dare he

He has the top two shirt buttons unbuttoned - that shows he's a rebel.
post #45 of 67
I would guess that Tim Cook knows when he's talking to a logistics expert, and that Apple needs one with a world outlook, or failing that, a pan-European outlook.

My limited experience with U.K. electronic and electrical retail is that has yet to be brought into the Best Buy age, which may be a good thing, but also that it must be a logistical Gordian Knot to solve every day. Stuff pulled in from around the world on 19th century streets and back roads, once the lorries leave the Motorways. Tax and trade rules in spades. Repair and returns? Unimaginable difficulties.

Mr. Browett may have what it takes to double and triple the retail operation in the near future, now that the style is established.

But then I am something of a professional optimist.
post #46 of 67
How did this happen? Dixons, Curry's & PC World? Hideous places.

This can't be good. I give him a year.
Building a faster horse...
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Building a faster horse...
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post #47 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

I would guess that Tim Cook knows when he's talking to a logistics expert, and that Apple needs one with a world outlook, or failing that, a pan-European outlook.

My limited experience with U.K. electronic and electrical retail is that has yet to be brought into the Best Buy age, which may be a good thing, but also that it must be a logistical Gordian Knot to solve every day. Stuff pulled in from around the world on 19th century streets and back roads, once the lorries leave the Motorways. Tax and trade rules in spades. Repair and returns? Unimaginable difficulties.

Mr. Browett may have what it takes to double and triple the retail operation in the near future, now that the style is established.

But then I am something of a professional optimist.

The thing is that getting the product to the store is not under his remit - that is part of operations. His job will be running the stores.

I would have much preferred that they hire someone with higher-end retail experience (e.g., a Harrod's executive) than someone who seems to have little to offer other than some experience in consumer electronic sales. Hopefully, the "tone" of the Apple Stores is set and not something he will be allowed to tinker with.
post #48 of 67
I certainly understand everyone's concern about this new hire but I think it might be unwarranted. He's not being hired to fix apple retail like Ron Johnson was to fix JC Penneys. I think he was hired because he would be trainable.
post #49 of 67
I'm sure his resume looked great but, boy-oh-boy, there is such a thing as lacking local knowledge.
post #50 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor David View Post

I certainly understand everyone's concern about this new hire but I think it might be unwarranted. He's not being hired to fix apple retail like Ron Johnson was to fix JC Penneys. I think he was hired because he would be trainable.


Agreed. The comparisons to Dixions are irrelevant. Apple is not a reseller where prices are manipulated or unethical sales practices are deployed. The price is always the same no matter where you buy Apple products except a few online outlets where there are small discounts. Apple stores are an extension of the Apple.com store.

I see a lot of travel in this guys future. Making deals regarding location, leases, tenant improvements, employment agencies and the like. I don't think we will see any significant changes in the current Apple retail store model.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #51 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Strange choice. Shopping at Dixons (and sister store PC World) is a terrible retailing experience.

This the beginning of THE END OF APPLE. Remember this day.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #52 of 67
Wow - Dixons Retail certainly getting a kicking here.

As someone who currently works in the Vision department of a Currys/PC World Megastore (previously a Mac Buddy for our Apple Shop-in-shop), this is very disappointing to see.

There has been a real push towards raising Customer Service standards (through the FIVES initiative) and KnowHow Services to offer a more tailored solution to our customers.

Things aren't perfect but I have seen improvements.

Anyway, I've met John Browett a few times and I can say he is a very nice guy. Good luck to him.

Bring on Apple TV!!!
post #53 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

This the beginning of THE END OF APPLE. Remember this day.

Uh, oh. Suddenly Newton has been infected with the Slapppycillus Pneumcoccial bug.

The only known cure? Watching Apple continue to succeed.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #54 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Uh, oh. Suddenly Newton has been infected with the Slapppycillus Pneumcoccial bug.

The only known cure? Watching Apple continue to succeed.

"May God keep us from single vision and Newton's sleep!" -- William Blake
post #55 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by penchanted View Post

The thing is that getting the product to the store is not under his remit - that is part of operations. His job will be running the stores.

I would have much preferred that they hire someone with higher-end retail experience (e.g., a Harrod's executive) than someone who seems to have little to offer other than some experience in consumer electronic sales. Hopefully, the "tone" of the Apple Stores is set and not something he will be allowed to tinker with.

Yes the tone must be engraved in stone by now.

Re his remit, I was merely suggesting that running tech stores in the UK must be good training in international strategies, maybe better than anyone gets in the US.

But then maybe not. We're all speculating from a great distance. Might as well be speculation on the positive side, for a change.
post #56 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Sounds exactly like Steve Jobs, in fact. I hated when Steve gave Stevenotes fully shaved; his stubble was the best.

Just a question unrelated to this thread. When/if the next iPhone is called iPhone 5, will you apologize? WHat will your response be? This question also goes to everyone else who exhibit a shrieking, condescending, insulting, patronizing reaction towards any who believe it probably will be called such. WIll you ban yourself? Serious question. Or will you just shrug your shoulders, delete your quote, and move on, after all the harassment that you gave people for predicting the obvious name?
post #57 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

Just a question unrelated to this thread. When/if the next iPhone is called iPhone 5, will you apologize? WHat will your response be? This question also goes to everyone else who exhibit a shrieking, condescending, insulting, patronizing reaction towards any who believe it probably will be called such. WIll you ban yourself? Serious question. Or will you just shrug your shoulders, delete your quote, and move on, after all the harassment that you gave people for predicting the obvious name?

This has nothing to do with the thread, so I'll answer you in PM.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #58 of 67
Maybe he's been hired so that Apple will never forget how bad bad consumer electronics retailing can be ;-)
post #59 of 67
Apple Geniuses - your time is almost over.

The only retail experience this guy has had is low-end, low-cost. Tesco is a supermarket chain that dominates through having expanded its out-of-town drive-to-shop stores during the 1980s, and buying up all the land they could, then getting exclusive planning permissions to build the only out of town supermarket for many medium and large sized UK towns. Dixons/PCWorld/Curry's did the same. THAT's how they got to dominate. It was nothing to do with good service or looking after customers - customers had no choice was what it came down to.

The Dixons Sales Group (or DSG as it is known) has probably the worst reputation of any UK store I can think of, not just in electronics. They have been losing money for years. They may have been good in the 1970s when I used to visit them as a kid, but after their 1980s expansion they rested on their laurels and monopoly type store locations and went downhill as each new top man in the company tried to squeeze more profits out of retail without really adding anything new other than cheap goods, high prices, and high pressure sales techniques.

Tesco has tried expanding into the larger EU, but cannot compete there because their business model is out of touch with modern retailing practices and they can't get cheap out of town monopoly sites. Instead, they expanded internationally by setting up supermarkets in countries such as Hungary or in Asian countries that had no previous experience of what a supermarket should be or do. Clever, but nothing to do with competing head to head, customer service or anything the Apple blurb is pumping out.

DSG tried to enter Switzerland and failed miserably. German Media Markt has a far superior offering and level of customer service. OK, Tesco is a lot better than Dixons at customer service, but are fast being overhauled by competitor Sainsbury and the even faster growing quality brand Marks & Spencer.

My only hope is that this new guy was brought in to Dixons to try to change the culture but didn't manage it so left; but even so, all that time at Tesco doesn't fill me with faith he knows anything about quality goods retailing; Tesco is more in tune with selling low quality, low price than high end, high price.

With a background in low cost, low pay, part-time employee staffed stores, I can only hope he doesn't change the Genius bar, and that the other aspects of Apple's retail store experience remain untouched by this guy trying to make his mark by improving profits as all execs think they can. He's obviously very clever, but is he right for Apple? More likely, Microsoft.

Apple, you did right to look abroad, but sadly you've been bamboozled. Steve would never have been taken in - after all, you can't kid a kidder, right?
post #60 of 67
strange choice... dixons and pc world are shit stores in so many respects...
post #61 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Yes but we want to be raped by Apple Stores.

Sure is better than the banks!
post #62 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Agreed. The comparisons to Dixions are irrelevant. Apple is not a reseller where prices are manipulated or unethical sales practices are deployed. The price is always the same no matter where you buy Apple products except a few online outlets where there are small discounts. Apple stores are an extension of the Apple.com store.

I see a lot of travel in this guys future. Making deals regarding location, leases, tenant improvements, employment agencies and the like. I don't think we will see any significant changes in the current Apple retail store model.

Ya, they've spent a decade building the most profitable retail stores in the world. It aint broke This guy wasn't hired to make changes to the apple retail experience. He was hired to open stores, like you said. The Apple store is kinda symbolic of Apple's OS's: simple, tasteful, understandable, inviting, user friendly. The Apple store is the public face of the company, I think if any large and ill changes come the blame should be on Tim Cook. Their stores are too integral to who they are as a company. And again, the new guy will be spending so much of his time filling his passport with stamps he won't have time to make fundamental changes to the retail experience.
post #63 of 67
For a very different angle on Mr. Browett, check out this Reuters story linked to on, of all places,

http://daringfireball.net/

Apologies if anyone else linked to this, I haven't read the whole thread.

If you want to go directly to the Reuters story and miss Gruber's priceless comments (he agrees with me):

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/...20131?irpc=932
post #64 of 67
Remember, Ron Johnson came from Target, and while they have some cute TV ads, Targets are generally a typical, boring mess of departments and products, with little or no help floor help. Yet none of that migrated to Apple.

I'd imagine Browett will be executing an already well-thought out retail plan with Apple and not making large sea changes for some time, if ever. Johnson was strong in general retail knowledge and execution skills, perhaps those are Browett's strengths as well, but with a more European foundation.
post #65 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by drdb View Post

It seems odd that the company with the best customer service record around hires someone who's in charge of a company with one of the worst customer service records around.

He's been at Dixon only four years, so older problems are not his doing. From the New York Times:

"One of the first things Mr. Browett did when he took over Dixons in 2007 was to scrap sales commissions and base staff bonuses on customer satisfaction. Now, employees can earn a bonus even if they miss sales targets as long as their store excels in customer satisfaction."

www.nytimes.com/2012/02/01/technology/apple-picks-dixons-chief-for-global-sales-push.html?_r=1&partner=yahoofinance
post #66 of 67
Reading the Times story, it looks like Apple picked the right guy.
post #67 of 67

I agree with Flaneur; your link is a must read to understand what Apple sees in this guy.
"Fibonacci: As easy as 1, 1, 2, 3..."
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"Fibonacci: As easy as 1, 1, 2, 3..."
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