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Have MacBook Air 1.3ghz getting new Air 1.7ghz. Upgrade Cloning

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
New to the Mac world but I am a not a newbie to PC technology.

I have a MacBook Air
1.4ghz
Intel Duo Core processor
2GB ram
64GB SSD
11" screem

Out grown it was my learning device to get use to the Apple world. I have coming a:

MacBook Air
1.7ghz
i7 processor
4GB ram
256GB SSD
13" screen

In the PC world, I would clone the first PC and then drop that image on the second and all the new hardware would be detected in Win7 if anything needed to be loaded then I would install needed drivers...if any

I have programs on the current MacBook installed from people that I cannot get again like Fusion4, MS Office 2011, Lion OS, etc. It originally came with Leopard and none of those applications.

Is this a wise thing to do in the Apple world since I am stepping up one MacBook Air to a more powerful MacBook Air?

Pls advise...
post #2 of 5
Quote:
In the PC world, I would clone the first PC and then drop that image on the second and all the new hardware would be detected in Win7 if anything needed to be loaded then I would install needed drivers...if any

Don't do that.

Quote:
I have programs on the current MacBook installed from people that I cannot get again like Fusion4, MS Office 2011, Lion OS, etc. It originally came with Leopard and none of those applications.

You want to use Migration Assistant to move your files over. Follow its instructions when you set up your new laptop.
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Don't do that.



You want to use Migration Assistant to move your files over. Follow its instructions when you set up your new laptop.

Read on the Acronis software and you will be corrected and see you can move one PC HAL to another PC HAL with the Universal Restore and if you have all items in place it is a perfect restore...we mainly deal with HP & Lenovo so I move directors around all the time with this process with no issues... Not new news on that been doing it for years..

Thx for the info I will look into that....thx again :-)
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by parcou View Post

New to the Mac world but I am a not a newbie to PC technology.

I have a MacBook Air
1.4ghz
Intel Duo Core processor
2GB ram
64GB SSD
11" screem

Out grown it was my learning device to get use to the Apple world. I have coming a:

MacBook Air
1.7ghz
i7 processor
4GB ram
256GB SSD
13" screen

In the PC world, I would clone the first PC and then drop that image on the second and all the new hardware would be detected in Win7 if anything needed to be loaded then I would install needed drivers...if any

I have programs on the current MacBook installed from people that I cannot get again like Fusion4, MS Office 2011, Lion OS, etc. It originally came with Leopard and none of those applications.

Is this a wise thing to do in the Apple world since I am stepping up one MacBook Air to a more powerful MacBook Air?

Pls advise...

Hi, in the Mac world the "disk image" is actually called Time Machine. Everytime you back up a Mac using Time Machine it will store the contents of the whole Mac including incremental changes to the Mac (per day, week, month, etc. as per how Time Machine works). This is not just files but the ENTIRE OS as well, which is really great.

So firstly back up everything on your original MacBook Air using Time Machine. It is recommended you start this process so that you always have an "image" of any Mac you are using.

Next, use "Restore From Time Machine" when installing Lion on your new MacBook Air.

That said and done, there are easier ways, using Migration Assistant.

Have a look at this:
http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1427


Restoring your entire system from a backup

A.
If you are restoring a backup made by a Mac to the same Mac:

With your backup drive connected, start up your Mac from the Lion recovery partition (Command-R at startup) or Mac OS X v10.6 installation disc. Then use the "Restore From Time Machine Backup" utility.

Note: If "You can't restore this backup because it was created by a different model of Mac" appears when restoring a backup that was made on a different Mac, follow the onscreen instructions.

B.
If you are restoring a backup made by one Mac to a completely different Mac

Important: If the backup you are about to restore is from a completely different Mac, use the Migration Assistant to transfer data from the backup, as described in the next section.

C.
Migrating a Time Machine backup to a new Mac

When you buy a new Mac, you can transfer all of your applications, files, settings, and other information from a Time Machine backup you've already made.

You will be asked if you want to transfer files when you start up your new Mac for the first time. Or, you can use the Migration Assistant (located in Applications/Utilities).


My personal recommendation is use Time Machine to backup your original MacBook Air to an external drive. Then, on the new Macbook Air, regardless of what you have done to it, hold down CMD-R after the "chime" startup sound to start up in Lion Recovery Mode. Use Migration Assistant within Lion Recovery Mode on your new MacBook Air to restore from your Time Machine drive.

Good luck.
post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by parcou View Post

Read on the Acronis software and you will be corrected and see you can move one PC HAL to another PC HAL with the Universal Restore and if you have all items in place it is a perfect restore...we mainly deal with HP & Lenovo so I move directors around all the time with this process with no issues... Not new news on that been doing it for years...

The Mac OS X Restore from Time Machine and Migration Assistant is more or less the same, it is quite intelligent to cater for any Mac transfer. As above if the Mac is the exact same model then Restore from Time Machine is pretty much a "cloning" process. If the Mac is a different model than Migration Assistant is similar to what you mention, it will clone as much as you can then intelligently adjust drivers, etc. for the new Mac and so on.

Full byte-level or similar cloning can be done using Carbon Copy Cloner or Super Duper, but as of Mac OS X 10.7 and Time Machine it's not needed anymore.

Enjoy, you will have fun with Mac now

Edit: Also for hard disk replacement Restore From Time Machine Backup is more or less a cloning as well. There are some things that you may have to adjust because it is not a byte-level clone but for those things you can use Carbon Copy or Super Duper, but like I said, stick with Restore From Time Machine or Migration Assistant and that should be enough.

The key to Mac is to know about it but also "trust" it
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