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Apple: Misdirected iMessages due to bad configuration, not a software bug

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
Reports of iOS 5 iMessages being sent to the wrong recipient are the result of a misconfigured phone, not an issue with the operating system or Apple's cloud services, the company indicated.

A report by Jim Dalrymple of The Loop notes that a situation where messages from an Apple Store employee were being directed to another user's iPhone were the result of the employee failing to follow directions while troubleshooting the customer's device.

The employee installed his personal SIM card in the customer's phone, linking the device to his Apple ID account in a way that resulted in his subsequent iMessages, including photos, being relayed to the customer's device.

the report cited Apple representative Natalie Harrison as saying, "this was an extremely rare situation that occurred when a retail employee did not follow the correct service procedure and used their personal SIM to help a customer who did not have a working SIM. This resulted in a temporary situation that has since been resolved by the employee."

Apple noted that to prevent such a situation, users should "toggle iMessage on and off" in the Settings app of any iOS 5 device configured to their Apple ID before it is given away or sold.

iMessageGate

The situation was profiled by Gizmodo as being a "the Apple bug that let us spy on a total stranger's iPhone." The website, notorious for creating and promoting controversies related to Apple with catchy names pattered after the Watergate scandal, actually knew who the stranger was and why it was occurring.

Presumably, it also knew how to stop spying on the Apple employee by turning off access to his account messages. Instead, the site chose to monitor and publish unflattering photos and and personal text conversations of the employee, actions which could expose the author to legal liability related to "publication of private facts" and "misappropriation of name or likeness," a form of privacy invasion.

Gizmodo and its Gawker Media parent previously escaped criminal charges for its role in paying for stolen property and refusing to return it in the case of Apple's iPhone 4 prototype after the San Mateo County district attorney's office decided not to file charges against the group and risk instigating an expensive trial over the rights of members of the media.

District Attorney Steven Wagstaffe did however note that "it was obvious [Gizmodo staff] were angry with the company about not being invited to some press conference or some big Apple event. We expected to see a certain amount of professionalism. This is like 15-year-old children talking," he said.

Wagstaffe added, "there was so much animosity, and they were very critical of Apple. They talked about having Apple right where they wanted them and they were really going to show them."


[ View article on AppleInsider ]
post #2 of 40
what say you, gizmodo chen?
"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
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"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
Reply
post #3 of 40
It is a bug. The same results happen if you were to sell your phone, or if it's lost or stolen. Below are the details:

http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/20...rong-place.ars

and on this Apple forum thread...

https://discussions.apple.com/message/16858629#16858629
post #4 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1 View Post

It is a bug. The same results happen if you were to sell your phone, or if it's lost or stolen. Below are the details:

http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/20...rong-place.ars

and on this Apple forum thread...

https://discussions.apple.com/message/16858629#16858629

Sounds like a bug to me, based on that story.

MobleMe had a way to remove clients from the list of synced devices. I guess that was another feature Apple dropped when they replaced MM with iCloud.
post #5 of 40
Very worrying that swapping sim cards can do this - automatically.

As a European well accustomed to sim cards, it has historically been a standard behaviour - since the days when mobiles first went 'mass market' - to occassionally swap sims with a friend - when their phone had run out of battery, etc, to let them phone home,etc, on their credit/bill.

You might say that this had changed with the world of the smart phone. However, this 'linking' being an autobehaviour also clearly looks wrong to me for the world of today.

We are heading in the direction of a complete separation of mobile service into just becoming about the local 'connectivity' for your device, and all comunications - messaging (e.g. emails - email provider, tweets - platform provier twitter, iMessage - platform provider apple etc) being completely separate from the mobile operator.

True number separation will take this the next step. Where your number from your 'number host' (who might not offer mobile serivce at all) can have calls pointed at your current mobile service provider, providing the connectivirt in the local country you are in at the time. Enabiling you to use local service providers in all countries you use, saving roaming costs, etc.
And also, regardles of whether at home or abroad, to have multiple numbers (from different providers) delivered to one device (like multiple email accounts from different providers on one device).

The problem is NOT iMessage accounts knowing the mobile numbers they are associated with, the problem is anything that does this automatically.

Afterall, this could suggest that a sim card that is simply alledging a certain phone number (frauduently) to an iPhone, would trigger that iphone registering the number with the iMessage account that user has created, and rerouting messages from any other iMessage iphone user to that imessage account over the iMessage platform rather than SMS. Indeed if the user who's number has been alledged (falsely) byt the phoneysim card, is not an iMessage user, they would not be registered in the database, so no collision woudl occur.
Message theft - don't even need the victims sim card.


Also raises questions of how long they keep numbers in database. In some markets mobile numbers are 'reallocated' to new users quite quicktly.
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post #6 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

District Attorney Steven Wagstaffe did however note that "it was obvious [Gizmodo staff] were angry with the company about not being invited to some press conference or some big Apple event. We expected to see a certain amount of professionalism. This is like 15-year-old children talking," he said.

*Slow clap*

Send them all to jail.

First they go to CES and shut off companies' TVs as they're giving demos, then they try to use a stolen iPhone as leverage to get exclusives, and now they're all whiny about not being invited to Apple events anymore "for some reason".

They're acting like they're FIVE years old.
post #7 of 40
And the big question still is why didn't they prosecute these asshole "15 year old"? Seems they are still engaged in the same kind of criminal behavior and haven't learned anything.
post #8 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Sounds like a bug to me, based on that story.

MobleMe had a way to remove clients from the list of synced devices. I guess that was another feature Apple dropped when they replaced MM with iCloud.

iCloud isn't a list of synced devices.

Might be nice for Apple to provide some awesome set of client management tools for iCloud at some point, but its sort of like setting up your Mac to check email, selling the thing, and then being irate that "somebody else is checking your email!!!"

There are clear and obvious, documented ways to protect yourself from such situations.
post #9 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bishop of Southwark View Post

Very worrying that swapping sim cards can do this - automatically.

As a European well accustomed to sim cards, ...

Also raises questions of how long they keep numbers in database. In some markets mobile numbers are 'reallocated' to new users quite quicktly.


Mobile phones aren't IP devices. They're on a custom network that (in GSM land) identifies devices based on their unique device ID stored on the SIM card. If you want to be able to send SMS, you do that through the carrier and it takes care of all that.

For Apple to offer iMessage as a more powerful alternative that can bridge the Internet and work with IP connected iPads and Macs, it has to tie device identity to something, and SIM cards supply the unique ID.

Complaining that things didn't work like they did in the 80s when you were swapping SIM cards with your friends is rather silly. If you don't want to mix up your devices and IDs, it's pretty simple:

- don't turn on iMessage and then change your SIM card!
- if you do decide to swap around SIM cards, disable iMessage first
- if you sell your phone, turn off iMessage first

Not exactly rocket science
post #10 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

Complaining that things didn't work like they did in the 80s when you were swapping SIM cards with your friends is rather silly. If you don't want to mix up your devices and IDs, it's pretty simple:

- don't turn on iMessage and then change your SIM card!
- if you do decide to swap around SIM cards, disable iMessage first
- if you sell your phone, turn off iMessage first

Not exactly rocket science

None of those suggestions work if you lose your iPhone or have it stolen.
post #11 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

iCloud isn't a list of synced devices.

But it damn well knows what devices are syncing to it! And as a user who owns the account, there damn well better be a way for me to secure my data from other people accessing it, even it that access was inadvertently given (or stolen).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

Might be nice for Apple to provide some awesome set of client management tools for iCloud at some point, but its sort of like setting up your Mac to check email, selling the thing, and then being irate that "somebody else is checking your email!!!"

Not a very accurate analogy. You have to take deliberate steps to create the email account in the mail program on that computer...launch the email client and specifically configure it by entering your email server, login, and password information. This is a case of all that being done automatically without your knowledge.

An iPhone assuming that just because I inserted my SIM card into it that I want it to sync to my iCloud account, without so much as a confirmation dialog box, is either a bug or incredibly piss-poor design. And to fail to provide a way to unassociate the device later is also poor design. MobileMe and iTunes have the ability to remove either an individual device or reset the entire access control list, respectively.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

There are clear and obvious, documented ways to protect yourself from such situations.

And yet not so "clear and obvious" that Apple's own employee screwed it up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

If you don't want to mix up your devices and IDs, it's pretty simple:

- don't turn on iMessage and then change your SIM card!
- if you do decide to swap around SIM cards, disable iMessage first
- if you sell your phone, turn off iMessage first

Not exactly rocket science

Weak. Sure, now that you've heard about this bug and what causes it, it's easy to avoid. But can you honestly expect that most people would have anticipated this issue until now? And even if you do irrationally have the expectation, do you think everyone would remember it every time? What about the case of a stolen phone? None of your "advice" would apply there. In that case, only a method to remove the device from access to your iCloud account would work. And Apple hasn't provide that.

Design failure or bug, take your pick. EIther way Apple needs to fix it.
post #12 of 40
I find it absurd that Apple engineers have known about this design flaw/bug for at least two months and they are still blowing off this security issue. Pretty sad.
post #13 of 40
"Reports of iOS 5 iMessages being sent to the wrong recipient”

This story, and Apple’s comment, seems to be about ONE report; an occurence after Genius service. We’ve seen other reports, plural—about iMessage and stolen phones—which are much more interesting and concerning situations.
post #14 of 40
Also, if anyone has physical access to your phone (even your locked phone) for 30 seconds, they can pop out your sim card, install it into their phone and turn on iMessage, then put your sim card back into your phone. iMessages directed to you will now go both to your phone and their phone and you will never know. Pretty bad design flaw/bug. Apple needs to address this security/privacy issue, instead of blowing it off.
post #15 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1 View Post

None of those suggestions work if you lose your iPhone or have it stolen.

Besides being idiotic to begin with.

Those steps could perfectly well be (and SHOULD BE) automated.

It's not like it's any difficult for the device to check if the SIM was changed.

We'll see a fix for this in some upcoming update, Apple is just saving face with this BS response.
post #16 of 40
It's not a bug, it's a huge crap in our pants.
post #17 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


District Attorney Steven Wagstaffe did however note that "it was obvious [Gizmodo staff] were angry with the company about not being invited to some press conference or some big Apple event. We expected to see a certain amount of professionalism. This is like 15-year-old children talking," he said.

I believe the incident that started all of it was Gawker offering money to folks that could give them details about Apple's rumored tablet including a look at it before it was announced. Apple likely responded not only with legal threats but also with refusing to allow them to attend the actual iPad announcement. Just as they cut off Gawker for all events after the iPhone stunt.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #18 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1 View Post

None of those suggestions work if you lose your iPhone or have it stolen.

http://supportprofile.apple.com

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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post #19 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

http://supportprofile.apple.com

How do you know this is linked to the way iMessage communicates ? There is no Apple support document that verifies this is the case.
post #20 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1 View Post

None of those suggestions work if you lose your iPhone or have it stolen.

Non of the suggestions are needed in that case. All your data is exposed in that case, unless of course you use the obvious way to protected your information by setting a password.
You can do a remote wipe to remove all your data.

J.
post #21 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

Mobile phones aren't IP devices. They're on a custom network that (in GSM land) identifies devices based on their unique device ID stored on the SIM card. If you want to be able to send SMS, you do that through the carrier and it takes care of all that.

For Apple to offer iMessage as a more powerful alternative that can bridge the Internet and work with IP connected iPads and Macs, it has to tie device identity to something, and SIM cards supply the unique ID.

Complaining that things didn't work like they did in the 80s when you were swapping SIM cards with your friends is rather silly. If you don't want to mix up your devices and IDs, it's pretty simple:

- don't turn on iMessage and then change your SIM card!
- if you do decide to swap around SIM cards, disable iMessage first
- if you sell your phone, turn off iMessage first

Not exactly rocket science

It's probably enough to disable SMS within iMessage. iMessage uses an email address as a unique id in that case. iPod touches and iPads without a sim card can communicate via iMessage after all.

J.
post #22 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnjnjn View Post

Non of the suggestions are needed in that case. All your data is exposed in that case, unless of course you use the obvious way to protected your information by setting a password.
You can do a remote wipe to remove all your data.

J.

If the thief/finder of your locked iPhone pulls the sim card from it and installs it into their iPhone to activate iMessage, your iMessages will be sent to both the thief's iPhone and your replacement iPhone. And you will never know this is taking place.

And as I described in an earlier post, this is especially troublesome if your phone is not stolen/lost, but you just have it simply lying around. Even when it's locked, if someone pulls the sim card from it for 30 seconds and uses it to activate iMessage on their iPhone, then places the sim card back into your locked iPhone. Your iMessages will be sent to both your phone and their phone. And you would never know this is happening.
post #23 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1 View Post

If the thief/finder of your locked iPhone pulls the sim card from it and installs it into their iPhone to activate iMessage, your iMessages will be sent to both the thief's iPhone and your replacement iPhone. And you will never know this is taking place.

Maybe the answer is to put a PIN code on your SIM, so that a thief/finder won't be able to activate the SIM card in the first place?
post #24 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiA View Post

Maybe the answer is to put a PIN code on your SIM, so that a thief/finder won't be able to activate the SIM card in the first place?

The customer shouldn't have to go through this unusual step. Apple needs to stop ignoring this security/privacy issue!
post #25 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1 View Post

If the thief/finder of your locked iPhone pulls the sim card from it and installs it into their iPhone to activate iMessage, your iMessages will be sent to both the thief's iPhone and your replacement iPhone. And you will never know this is taking place.

And as I described in an earlier post, this is especially troublesome if your phone is not stolen/lost, but you just have it simply lying around. Even when it's locked, if someone pulls the sim card from it for 30 seconds and uses it to activate iMessage on their iPhone, then places the sim card back into your locked iPhone. Your iMessages will be sent to both your phone and their phone. And you would never know this is happening.

As is already said by ChiA, you sim should be locked. So you always need two passwords to access all the functionality of your iPhone.
Without the pin code of the sim no one can use it.
Unless ofcourse they know your pin code.

As a reminder, full prove security doesn't exist. If your car keys are stolen, someone has access to your car, no matter how advanced your car security is.
So you should never let your iPhone 'lying around', that's careless and unwise in the same way as letting your credit card lying around.

J.
post #26 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1 View Post

The customer shouldn't have to go through this unusual step. Apple needs to stop ignoring this security/privacy issue!

So you admit that this fixes the 'problem'. I can assure you that locking your sim isn't 'unusual' at all.
It's highly promoted by all carriers I know of and it's the first thing you are instructed to do if you start using a new phone.
I find it 'unusual' that you blatantly ignore all security measures and complain about security later on.
I wonder if your care about security is the same for other brands.
Read my previous post.

J.
post #27 of 40
This started happening to me within the last week and my phone is not misconfigured. Just started between a friend of mine and my phone.
I would send him a text and his wife's phone would get and she would send back and it would show from his phone.
It's intermittent since last week.
Started for no reason and I do not have a new phone. I have a 4 running latest IOS.
post #28 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnjnjn View Post

So you admit that this fixes the 'problem'. I can assure you that locking your sim isn't 'unusual' at all.
It's highly promoted by all carriers I know of and it's the first thing you are instructed to do if you start using a new phone.
I find it 'unusual' that you blatantly ignore all security measures and complain about security later on.
I wonder if your care about security is the same for other brands.
Read my previous post.

J.

I find it 'unusual' that Apple blatantly ignores this security/privacy issue. No other phone has this security/privacy issue. This is a design flaw/bug Apple should fix! If Apple refuses to fix this security/privacy issue, then they need to actively promote locking the sim card for all customers. Because most customers have no idea of the unique iMessage security/privacy risk of not locking the sim card on the iPhone, and most customers (US customers) don't even know it's an option!
post #29 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnjnjn View Post

As a reminder, full prove security doesn't exist. If your car keys are stolen, someone has access to your car, no matter how advanced your car security is.
So you should never let your iPhone 'lying around', that's careless and unwise in the same way as letting your credit card lying around.

J.

Poor analogy! If you have your locked laptop lying around for a minute, you don't have to worry about someone easily & forever hijacking your messages to their laptop, without your knowledge. This is the case with the iPhone and iMessages. Of course nothing is 100% security proof. But this iMessage issue is a major security/privacy risk that needs to be fixed by Apple, instead of them ignoring it.
post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1 View Post

Poor analogy! If you have your locked laptop lying around for a minute, you don't have to worry about someone easily & forever hijacking your messages to their laptop, without your knowledge. This is the case with the iPhone and iMessages. Of course nothing is 100% security proof. But this iMessage issue is a major security/privacy risk that needs to be fixed by Apple, instead of them ignoring it.

The anology is excellent, it's your thinking that's flawed.
Every mobile phone with a sim card has the risk that personal data is exposed if the sim card is unlocked. Depending on de capabilities of the phone and the data saved on the card the risk is more or less. So you should never forget to lock your sim.
And that fixes the security 'issues'.
I wonder how many creditcards you have lying around.

J.
post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnjnjn View Post

The anology is excellent, it's your thinking that's flawed.
Every mobile phone with a sim card has the risk that personal data is exposed if the sim card is unlocked. Depending on de capabilities of the phone and the data saved on the card the risk is more or less. So you should never forget to lock your sim.
And that fixes the security 'issues'.
I wonder how many creditcards you have lying around.

J.

Sorry, but my analogy & thinking is excellent, it's your analogy and thinking that is flawed on many levels. Correct, every GSM phone has a sim card with inherit security risks. But only an iPhone with iOS 5.0, can a iPhone hijack messages from another iPhone, without the user knowing about it and/or stopping it. On all other phones, if a sim card is lost or stolen, it can be deactivated. And the sim card can no longer be used to receive messages. And only one phone with an installed and valid sim card can receive messages. But on the iPhone, once iMessage is activated with the sim card, it never verifies the sim card again for messaging. Big time flaw! So even when the sim card is removed or deactivated, the phone still receives iMessages! Very big difference! Which is even more troublesome is if someone 'borrows/steals' your sim card for just 30 seconds to activate iMessage on their phone. Even when they replace your sim card back into your phone, their phone will still receive your iMessages. Without your knowledge! No other phone has these issues. Only the iPhone! Apple simply needs to fix this bug/design flaw! Or educate their customers about the unique to iPhone risks of iMessage and highly recommend all customers to pin lock their sim. They have done neither!

Btw, using your flawed credit card analogy, I will know if someone uses my credit card number. And I can cancel the credit card so it can no longer be used. But with the flawed design of iMessage, I have no way of knowing if someone else is also receiving my iMessages! And deactivating the sim card does not prevent them from still receiving my messages.
post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1 View Post

Sorry, but my analogy & thinking is excellent, it's your analogy and thinking that is flawed ... .

Repeating your arguments doesn't make your case any better.
Your wrong about this and if you cannot conclude that from my previous posts (and the posts of others), you never will.

J.
post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnjnjn View Post

Repeating your arguments doesn't make your case any better.
Your wrong about this and if you cannot conclude that from my previous posts (and the posts of others), you never will.

J.

I have proven my argument is very valid, as have many people in other articles and forums. And I have proven your argument is very flawed. You are wrong about this issue. Sorry you fail to understand why your argument is flawed.
post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1 View Post

It is a bug. The same results happen if you were to sell your phone, or if it's lost or stolen. Below are the details:

http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/20...rong-place.ars

and on this Apple forum thread...

https://discussions.apple.com/message/16858629#16858629

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Sounds like a bug to me, based on that story.

MobleMe had a way to remove clients from the list of synced devices. I guess that was another feature Apple dropped when they replaced MM with iCloud.

Yup, not the bug they thought was being implied, but a bug nonetheless. If I wipe a device remotely then no data of any kind belonging to me should be re-appearing on the phone, period.
post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1 View Post

I find it absurd that Apple engineers have known about this design flaw/bug for at least two months and they are still blowing off this security issue. Pretty sad.

LIKE

Add a like button to posts AI & stop asking me to write over 5 characters. Geesh, short by 1!!
post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

Mobile phones aren't IP devices. They're on a custom network that (in GSM land) identifies devices based on their unique device ID stored on the SIM card. If you want to be able to send SMS, you do that through the carrier and it takes care of all that.

Never said phones were IP devices, don't know where you go that from.
They could easily end up becoming them, but nothing in my post requires that.

The problem is that iMessage on the iPhone of someone sending a message does a lookup of the recipient (by mobile number), an routes message via iMessage platform if that number is tied to an iMessage account.

You are quite correct, the mobile networks are addressing and tracking devices by ID, not by mobile number, but that is not where the security flaw is. The security flaw is due to unthought through handling of "mobile to iMessage user" identifications, and the consequences of not thinking that through - ie a more formal verification method, and auto reverification on a quite frequent interval.

Quote:
For Apple to offer iMessage as a more powerful alternative that can bridge the Internet and work with IP connected iPads and Macs, it has to tie device identity to something, and SIM cards supply the unique ID.

Nobody is criticising the existence of the iMessage platform, indeed it is a step in the direction we are clearly heading (separation of platforms and connectivity provision).

Further, the security issue we are taking about (let's says issues - as some people are talking about different ones, or certainly different implications / exploits) only relates to the SIM card interplay, and the one issue / aspect of the issue I am talking about relates to iPhones, not other devices.
Although, the victim need not even be using an iPhone, it is the victims friends who need to be using them.

Quote:
Complaining that things didn't work like they did in the 80s when you were swapping SIM cards with your friends is rather silly.

That is not what I complained about at all.
I was pointing out that it broke long established conventions on the operation of devices and where separations occur.

The security issues are a direct result of doing this.

Quote:
I you don't want to mix up your devices and IDs, it's pretty simple:

- don't turn on iMessage and then change your SIM card!
- if you do decide to swap around SIM cards, disable iMessage first
- if you sell your phone, turn off iMessage first

Not exactly rocket science

We are taking about a serious security flaw enabling pairs of rogue / faked sims, to be used to populate fraudulent entries into the iMessage database, theirby investing SMS messages originating on iPhones AND/ALSO allowing spoofed incoming messages to iOS phones
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post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by hezetation View Post

LIKE

Add a like button to posts AI & stop asking me to write over 5 characters. Geesh, short by 1!!

The last thing we need is social networking integration.
post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

The last thing we need is social networking integration.

That's actually a pretty standard forum feature. Really it doesn't matter all that much to me, was being a little facetious.
post #39 of 40
Apple Compensates Victim of iMessage Bug for Breach of Privacy -

http://www.macrumors.com/2012/02/06/...ch-of-privacy/
post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by anmily View Post

I think it's ridiculous, apple engineers at least two months this one design defect/mistakes, but they still blow the security problem

Would you mind rephrasing that in the form of a sentence, please?
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