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29% of Kindle Fire owners plan to spend more at Amazon, but only 54% very satisfied

post #1 of 75
Thread Starter 
A new survey has revealed that 29 percent of Kindle Fire owners plan to spend more money at online retailer Amazon, but only 54 percent of them said they were very satisfied with the device.

Research firm ChangeWave conducted a survey in January of over 2,600 North American consumers and learned that, on average, 20 percent of online shoppers plan to spend more money on Amazon.com in the next 90 days. Among Kindle Fire owners, which reached 6 percent of respondents, that number rose to 29 percent, while non-Kindle Fire owners averaged 19 percent.

The news should come as a relief to Amazon, given its strategy of selling the Kindle Fire at a loss while banking on increased profits from content sales. The company announced its fourth quarter 2011 earnings on Tuesday, disappointing Wall Street with a 57 percent decline in net income despite the fact that Kindle sales were up 177 percent year over year.

Amazon chose not to reveal how many Kindle Fire devices it had sold during the quarter, but one analyst hazarded an estimate of six million units.




The data also showed Amazon to have a dominant position in the e-commerce market. Only 20 percent of respondents said they did not plan to make a purchase on Amazon over the next 90 days. By comparison, 78 percent of consumers said they had no plans to spend money on Walmart.com and 65 percent said they did not see themselves buying anything from eBay.com during the same period.

Not all of the survey results brought good news for Amazon, though, as a question on whether Kindle Fire customers were satisfied with the device prompted just 54 percent to respond that they were very satisfied. An additional 38 percent said they were somewhat satisfied. That compares to results from a November 2011 survey that found 74 percent of iPad users and 49 percent of other tablet device users to be very satisfied with their respective tablets.


Apple iPad and Other Tablet Device ratings are from a November 2011 survey.


ChangeWave went on to note that past surveys have shown that the percentage of respondents who say they are very satisfied with a device is "highly predictive of future demand for that device."

The cost of the Kindle Fire was by far the most-liked aspect of the device, as 59 percent of respondents selected the option. The tablet's color screen was the second-most popular with 31 percent of votes. As for dislikes, 27 percent of owners said the the lack of physical volume buttons was what they disliked most about the tablet, while 21 percent went with the lack of a camera.

[ View article on AppleInsider ]
post #2 of 75
If 29% of Kindle Fire owners plan on spending more money at Amazon... that means 71% of Kindle Fire owners do not plan to spend any more money at Amazon.

So... was it really worth it to go through the complicated and expensive process to build the Kindle Fire and sell it at cost?

I mean... those same people might have already been Amazon customers who would have purchased things anyway.

The whole point of the Kindle Fire was to get it out there at a cheap price... basically sell it at cost... and make it up in additional sales.

Is 29% enough for the dream to become a reality?
post #3 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

If 29% of Kindle Fire owners plan on spending more money at Amazon... that means 71% of Kindle Fire owners do not plan to spend any more money at Amazon...

"... in the next 90 days."
post #4 of 75
Who cares? Hate these sorts of articles on this site, as they come across as a "see, see! Teh competition totally suxxors!!"

I own a Macbook. I own an iPhone. It's the third one so far. Love all my Apple products, all they way back to my first 5gb Gen 1 iPod that forced me to use MusicMatch just to load music onto it. In all the time I've loved Apple products, I've never once felt the need to slam the competition to make myself feel better about my expensive Apple purchases. The site is called Apple Insider. Report on Apple news, and leave the rest to Engadget, The Verge, or Gizmodo.
post #5 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

If 29% of Kindle Fire owners plan on spending more money at Amazon... that means 71% of Kindle Fire owners do not plan to spend any more money at Amazon.

So... was it really worth it to go through the complicated and expensive process to build the Kindle Fire and sell it at cost?

I mean... those same people might have already been Amazon customers who would have purchased things anyway.

The whole point of the Kindle Fire was to get it out there at a cheap price... basically sell it at cost... and make it up in additional sales.

Is 29% enough for the dream to become a reality?

Probably too soon to tell. Even if 29% 'plan' to spend more, part of the reason for the Fire is to increase impulse buys... Plus, even if the other 71% don't spend more, they may switch some of their spending from lower-margin physical books to higher-margin electronic purchases.

From the cost breakdowns I've seen, they basically sell the Fire for the cost of parts and manufacture. If they sold 1 million, and the 29% do spend $20 more each, that could be several million to pay for the NRE. If they sell 5 million, and the 29% spend $50 more, that's up to $70 million. Of course, we can only guess at how many will be sold, how many will spend more, how much more they will spend, and so on...

In any case, it looks like Amazon might be able to make a profit from the Fire experiment. Worse case for them, they can get out without too much of a loss.
post #6 of 75
Apple is doom
post #7 of 75
I love how everyone takes the pathetic breakdown of costs, that were produced before the product was even available, as the real deal.
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post #8 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycomiko View Post

I love how everyone takes the pathetic breakdown of costs, that were produced before the product was even available, as the real deal.

Has the breakdown of costs been updated since the product has been available for the last 2 months?
post #9 of 75
I don't think it would be a relief to them. You sell a device at or below cost, and plan to make it up on content, and only one third of the customers bite.
post #10 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Has the breakdown of costs been updated since the product has been available for the last 2 months?

Has any breakdown of cost ever been confirmed by anybody?
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post #11 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I don't think it would be a relief to them. You sell a device at or below cost, and plan to make it up on content, and only one third of the customers bite.

confirmation of products cost to amazon? or are you reliant on make believe figures?
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post #12 of 75
Ok. 54% of users were extremely satisfied. The more interesting figure is what is the combined number of users who were both "Extremely satisfied" plus users who were "Satisfied". To me that is the important number. If the majority of users fall in one of those two categories, which they obviously do since 54% were extremely satisfied, a product is successful.

The Kindle Fire is a generation one product at a low cost and comparing it to a generation two product at about 3 times the cost with a larger screen is dumb. The average consumer may not be able to justify that 3x cost just to read something or surf the internet. For many consumers the Kindle Fire may be exactly what they need.

I have iPad 1, iPad2, and Kindle Fire so I am not the average consumer and when I want to sit down and just read a book or a magazine or sometimes even surfing the web I will usually pick up the Kindle Fire because it is smaller, lighter, easier to hold, and quite frankly just better for flat out reading.

If I want full app experience, larger screen web browsing, it's always the iPad. But I knew that when I bought the Kindle Fire.

But having said that here are my complaints:

The lack of actual volume buttons was a huge mistake. It's so annoying to have to navigate multiple menus to just get to volume control when watching a movie or listening to music.

But the number one biggest gotcha of every new Kindle model, not even mentioned here, was putting the power off buttons on every Kindle model at the bottom where if you just set it on your lap the wrong way or just try to hold the thing in a natural way to read, it turns the device off in the middle of reading something.

Someone in the usability group at Amazon needs to be fired for that last problem. It truly is horrible. The old Kindles required you to slide the physical power button at the top of the device to the left (and it was hard to do) to even turn it off and now just placing it on your lap turns it off.

Sorry, Jeff Bezos, but that that last item is one thing Steve Jobs would have flipped out over and you should have too. It's taken a lot of joy out of EVERY Kindle model on this round for me.
post #13 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by bohannjn View Post

But the number one biggest gotcha of every new Kindle model, not even mentioned here, was putting the power off buttons on every Kindle model at the bottom where if you just set it on your lap the wrong way or just try to hold the thing in a natural way to read, it turns the device off in the middle of reading something. .


I have a similar problem with the ipad 2 and the magnetic cover. It often places the ipad at an agle that the volume buttons are activated, either turning off, or turning on the sound. Annoying. Worst when the kid turns it down and then shouts out to get me to fix it.

Plus because it operates which ever way its turned around, I have managed to activate the lock button while surfing.
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post #14 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by bohannjn View Post

Ok. 54% of users were extremely satisfied. The more interesting figure is what is the combined number of users who were both "Extremely satisfied" plus users who were "Satisfied". To me that is the important number. If the majority of users fall in one of those two categories, which they obviously do since 54% were extremely satisfied, a product is successful.

The Kindle Fire is a generation one product at a low cost and comparing it to a generation two product at about 3 times the cost with a larger screen is dumb. The average consumer may not be able to justify that 3x cost just to read something or surf the internet. For many consumers the Kindle Fire may be exactly what they need.

I have iPad 1, iPad2, and Kindle Fire so I am not the average consumer and when I want to sit down and just read a book or a magazine or sometimes even surfing the web I will usually pick up the Kindle Fire because it is smaller, lighter, easier to hold, and quite frankly just better for flat out reading.

If I want full app experience, larger screen web browsing, it's always the iPad. But I knew that when I bought the Kindle Fire.

But having said that here are my complaints:

The lack of actual volume buttons was a huge mistake. It's so annoying to have to navigate multiple menus to just get to volume control when watching a movie or listening to music.

But the number one biggest gotcha of every new Kindle model, not even mentioned here, was putting the power off buttons on every Kindle model at the bottom where if you just set it on your lap the wrong way or just try to hold the thing in a natural way to read, it turns the device off in the middle of reading something.

Someone in the usability group at Amazon needs to be fired for that last problem. It truly is horrible. The old Kindles required you to slide the physical power button at the top of the device to the left (and it was hard to do) to even turn it off and now just placing it on your lap turns it off.

Sorry, Jeff Bezos, but that that last item is one thing Steve Jobs would have flipped out over and you should have too. It's taken a lot of joy out of EVERY Kindle model on this round for me.


It just boggles the mind to see such obvious defects as the absence of physical volume controls and horrible placement of the power button. Did anyone at Amazon even try one of these before hitting the market? Seriously.

Unfortunately, one sees this kind of crap all over the place in all industries. The hurdle to be a superior company is so low, I'm not surprized the Apple has hit it out of the park.
post #15 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by bohannjn View Post


But the number one biggest gotcha of every new Kindle model, not even mentioned here, was putting the power off buttons on every Kindle model at the bottom where if you just set it on your lap the wrong way or just try to hold the thing in a natural way to read, it turns the device off in the middle of reading something.

Someone in the usability group at Amazon needs to be fired for that last problem. It truly is horrible. The old Kindles required you to slide the physical power button at the top of the device to the left (and it was hard to do) to even turn it off and now just placing it on your lap turns it off.

Sorry, Jeff Bezos, but that that last item is one thing Steve Jobs would have flipped out over and you should have too. It's taken a lot of joy out of EVERY Kindle model on this round for me.

Really?

Though the power button on the Kindle Fire is located on the bottom of the device (exactly the same size and distance as the headphone jack from the microUSB port), it protrudes from the device's edge less than one millimeter and requires a rather firm 'push' to activate.

If yours is so easily activated that merely placing "it on your lap the wrong way or just try to hold the thing in a natural way to read, it turns the device off", then something's definitely wrong with that particular device and you should have it repaired/replaced.



In the meantime, just use the device with the power button on top and the speakersa facing downward as the Kindle Fire is largely a completely blank slate (no controls/markings) on the front, so rotating it 180 degrees won't pose any usability issues whatsoever.

Anyway... Really enjoying my Kindle Fire, consider it one of the most user-friendly and value laden device I've ever owned.
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post #16 of 75
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Originally Posted by Just_Me View Post

Apple is doom

We should have a built-in smiley on AppleInsider that says just that!
post #17 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Anyway... Really enjoying my Kindle Fire, consider it one of the most user-friendly and value laden device I've ever owned.

But of course... Seriously though, can you elaborate more on what you enjoy about it, what's valuable, and what apps you use? I'm not mocking, like I said I am beginning iPad development so I don't have time to surf Android sites. Please elaborate on the Fire and does the Tab 10.1 have Honeycomb? Are the book formats for the Fire basically ePub or other stuff? How hard is it to port Android apps to Fire apps?
post #18 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycomiko View Post

I have a similar problem with the ipad 2 and the magnetic cover. It often places the ipad at an agle that the volume buttons are activated, either turning off, or turning on the sound. Annoying. Worst when the kid turns it down and then shouts out to get me to fix it.

Plus because it operates which ever way its turned around, I have managed to activate the lock button while surfing.

Hmm. Never seemed to have happened to me on my iPad 2 with magnetic cover. You have to lift the edge a bit to turn up/down the volume but that's as far as the issue goes. I have accidentally activated the lock button before but it quite rarely happens.
post #19 of 75
....and B&N is following Amazon's path...all articles points to Amazon destroying B&N and then crushes book publishers and authors will all be happy to go self-published...OMFG, it's the end of the world as we know it!

These survey means nothing...imagine Jobs making this decisions based on this kind of crap???!
post #20 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

But of course... Seriously though, can you elaborate more on what you enjoy about it, what's valuable, and what apps you use? I'm not mocking, like I said I am beginning iPad development so I don't have time to surf Android sites. Please elaborate on the Fire and does the Tab 10.1 have Honeycomb? Are the book formats for the Fire basically ePub or other stuff? How hard is it to port Android apps to Fire apps?

- The size/form-factor is pretty ideal for reading/media consumption, and the device's dual-core SoC performs very well no matter the task/app.

- For me, the Kindle Fire's 'value' comes from the fact that for a device so inexpensive yet sacrifices very little in the way of build-quality, screen clarity or performance when compared with any modern tablet device, and both books and magazine subscriptions are very nicely priced.

- I use all manner of different apps, from light gaming (e;g Cut The Rope, Angry Birds, etc) to web surfing, to Netflix, to HuLu Plus, to lengthy reading sessions of both books and magazines.

- No... The Kindle Fire does not run proprietary apps, and every app that is available in the Amazon Appstore the same as the same title found in the Android App Store, as it is (in fact) an Android tablet. NOTE: I even read my NOOK app subscriptions on my Kindle Fire perfectly.

Additionally:: Yes, the all current Samsung Galaxy Tabs (8.9, 10.1, 7 plus, 7.7) run Honeycomb, and even ICS for those choose to install it.

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post #21 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

If 29% of Kindle Fire owners plan on spending more money at Amazon... that means 71% of Kindle Fire owners do not plan to spend any more money at Amazon.

So... was it really worth it to go through the complicated and expensive process to build the Kindle Fire and sell it at cost?

I mean... those same people might have already been Amazon customers who would have purchased things anyway.

The whole point of the Kindle Fire was to get it out there at a cheap price... basically sell it at cost... and make it up in additional sales.

Is 29% enough for the dream to become a reality?

I had the same thought. But I guess Amazon doesn't need to make it all back in one month.

Still... a risky strategy by Amazon: sell one product at a loss in order to subsidize some other low margin product. That's not how the razor blade strategy is supposed to work -- the blades are supposed to be high margin.
post #22 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

But of course... Seriously though, can you elaborate more on what you enjoy about it, what's valuable, and what apps you use? I'm not mocking, like I said I am beginning iPad development so I don't have time to surf Android sites. Please elaborate on the Fire and does the Tab 10.1 have Honeycomb? Are the book formats for the Fire basically ePub or other stuff? How hard is it to port Android apps to Fire apps?

It's DaHarder who's posting. Dd you perchance miss that?
post #23 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

- The size/form-factor is pretty ideal for reading/media consumption, and the device's dual-core SoC performs very well no matter the task/app.

- For me, the Kindle Fire's 'value' comes from the fact that for a device so inexpensive yet sacrifices very little in the way of build-quality, screen clarity or performance when compared with any modern tablet device, and both books and magazine subscriptions are very nicely priced.

- I use all manner of different apps, from light gaming (e;g Cut The Rope, Angry Birds, etc) to web surfing, to Netflix, to HuLu Plus, to lengthy reading sessions of both books and magazines.

- No... The Kindle Fire does not run proprietary apps, and every app that is available in the Amazon Appstore the same as the same title found in the Android App Store, as it is (in fact) an Android tablet. NOTE: I even read my NOOK app subscriptions on my Kindle Fire perfectly.

Translation:
"The screen clarity, build quality, and performance are not as good as the competition, it doesn't run many apps, and there's nothing impressive about it at all, but it was cheap."

That's one of the things that's missed in the customer satisfaction question. Users will always judge satisfaction compared to their expectations. So 54% of Fire users were very satisfied, knowing that they were buying a cheap, cut rate device. 74% of iPad users were vary satisfied when they were expecting a top of the line, premium device. That is, the iPad users expected more than the Fire users, so being 'very satisfied' means more in the case of the iPad. The differences are therefore much greater than the numbers indicate.
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post #24 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Anyway... Really enjoying my Kindle Fire, consider it one of the most user-friendly and value laden device I've ever owned.

This comment alone tells me that the Kindle Fire is doomed.

DaHarder said the same thing about the 7 inch Galaxy Tab (you know the one, 3 each - sales were smooth)... and we all know how that turned out.
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post #25 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

This comment alone tells me that the Kindle Fire is doomed.

DaHarder said the same thing about the 7 inch Galaxy Tab (you know the one, 3 each - sales were smooth)... and we all know how that turned out.

Oh yeah, he's probably the only person in the world that was touting Honeycomb as being better than iOS on the iPad. He's not really the go-to guy for objective info when comparing to Apple products.

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post #26 of 75
it's a survey of 2607 people, in north america, taken from a fixed, profoundly skewed, population...

"This is accomplished through a weekly series of large sample surveys to its network of 25,000 accredited business and technology professionals, and early-adopter consumers, working in more than 20 industries."

...hmm, well that's going to produce results similar to the general population isn't it, oh noes, hang on, that's not right is it

for the benefit of the hard of understanding who think amazon is doomed based on only 29% saying they'll spend more, you've got it wrong...

"Research firm ChangeWave conducted a survey in January of over 2,600 North American consumers and learned that, on average, 20 percent of online shoppers plan to spend more money on Amazon.com in the next 90 days. Among Kindle Fire owners, which reached 6 percent of respondents, that number rose to 29 percent, while non-Kindle Fire owners averaged 19 percent."

...it's saying, kindle fire owners are over 52% more likely to spend more money with amazon than non-owners, that sounds pretty good for amazon

but given the likely distortion caused by the skewed population it might as well claim that buying a kindle fire makes you fly, you understand the speech of animals, and your car disappears

there's nothing in this survey worth wasting any more time on
post #27 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by umumum View Post

for the benefit of the hard of understanding who think amazon is doomed based on only 29% saying they'll spend more, you've got it wrong...

Huh? What?!

I must have missed something.

Did someone in this thread think that Amazon was doomed??

Hmmmm... must reread thread...
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post #28 of 75
I am curious as to the change in likelihood to buy between Kindle Fire owners and iPad owners with the Amazon app installed.

Certainly it is easier to purchase Kindle content and movies. But I know I purchase a LOT from Amazon on my iOS devices... it's so simple. The best is going to Target, scanning the barcode, finding it cheaper on Amazon, and then one-click buying and having it shipped via 2-Day service whilst IN Target.

Since Amazon's core strategy is the sales of content, and the Kindle Fire is only a method of facilitating easy purchasing of digital content (which is difficult on iOS devices do to Apple's 30% cut and Amazon refusing to offer support), I wonder if Amazon would have been better off focusing on iOS users if Apple had removed or reduced their 30% cut.

It would be interesting if the Kindle Fire was in actuality of a response influenced by Apple's 30% policy.

You would think if Amazon was allowed to sell content on the iPad in the exact manner as on the Kindle Fire (certainly possible) and make the same profit (impossible due to the 30% cut), it would make more sense for Amazon to stick to its core business and enjoy a symbiotic relationship with Apple without all the risk selling hardware entails.
post #29 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

But of course... Seriously though, can you elaborate more on what you enjoy about it, what's valuable, and what apps you use? I'm not mocking, like I said I am beginning iPad development so I don't have time to surf Android sites. Please elaborate on the Fire and does the Tab 10.1 have Honeycomb? Are the book formats for the Fire basically ePub or other stuff? How hard is it to port Android apps to Fire apps?

I bought my daughter one and she loves it. The number one thing for her is the size. She can slip it into her purse and take it anywhere with out issue. She is 14 years old and only wanted the ability to surf, read, email and Facebook, this provides all that and more and a fraction of the cost.
post #30 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Translation:
"The screen clarity, build quality, and performance are not as good as the competition, it doesn't run many apps, and there's nothing impressive about it at all, but it was cheap."

That's one of the things that's missed in the customer satisfaction question. Users will always judge satisfaction compared to their expectations. So 54% of Fire users were very satisfied, knowing that they were buying a cheap, cut rate device. 74% of iPad users were vary satisfied when they were expecting a top of the line, premium device. That is, the iPad users expected more than the Fire users, so being 'very satisfied' means more in the case of the iPad. The differences are therefore much greater than the numbers indicate.

Wow, I didn't get that at all. I will break the news too you, I know several Fire owners and none of them feel the "settled" when purchasing it, including myself. Your analysis is FUD at best. At 2x the price, iPad owners should be 108% very satisfied. I have two iPads that freely sit around my house for all to use, my daughter has a Fire and I have yet seen her put the Fire down and reach for the iPad, it does precisely what she wants and needs without fail, NETFLIX, HULU+, Facebook ect..... I have first hand knowledge of this and personally own one, what do you base your comments on?
post #31 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Oh yeah, he's probably the only person in the world that was touting Honeycomb as being better than iOS on the iPad. He's not really the go-to guy for objective info when comparing to Apple products.

And I would argue most people on this site aren't either, at least in terms of objectivity. I don't have a Kindle Fire, but I do have a Kindle touch that I much prefer over my iPad when I am actually reading. Apple doesn't have to rule everything, and other companies have smart, capable people making great, viable products.
post #32 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post

I am curious as to the change in likelihood to buy between Kindle Fire owners and iPad owners with the Amazon app installed.

Certainly it is easier to purchase Kindle content and movies. But I know I purchase a LOT from Amazon on my iOS devices... it's so simple. The best is going to Target, scanning the barcode, finding it cheaper on Amazon, and then one-click buying and having it shipped via 2-Day service whilst IN Target.

Since Amazon's core strategy is the sales of content, and the Kindle Fire is only a method of facilitating easy purchasing of digital content (which is difficult on iOS devices do to Apple's 30% cut and Amazon refusing to offer support), I wonder if Amazon would have been better off focusing on iOS users if Apple had removed or reduced their 30% cut.

It would be interesting if the Kindle Fire was in actuality of a response influenced by Apple's 30% policy.

You would think if Amazon was allowed to sell content on the iPad in the exact manner as on the Kindle Fire (certainly possible) and make the same profit (impossible due to the 30% cut), it would make more sense for Amazon to stick to its core business and enjoy a symbiotic relationship with Apple without all the risk selling hardware entails.

Purchasing content on the Fire is insanely easy and dangerous. One click is great but in the hands of a teenager I had to lay down the ground rules. Amazon does not have any type of filter system in place so it is easy to spend spend spend. I am a Prime member and the Prime content is awesome, all the free content is nice and easy to get.
post #33 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellacool View Post

Amazon does not have any type of filter system in place so it is easy to spend spend spend.

Well, when you virtually pay people to take something off your hands, you have to make up for it somehow.

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post #34 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

It's DaHarder who's posting. Dd you perchance miss that?

Which has absolutely nothing to the specific questions asked by nvidia2008, and if you have no ownership experience with the device in question, you'd do well to just sit back and learn rather than jumping in to the discussion with your inane trolling.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Oh yeah, he's probably the only person in the world that was touting Honeycomb as being better than iOS on the iPad. He's not really the go-to guy for objective info when comparing to Apple products.

Maybe if you keep posting this blatantly false statement, you'll one day believe it, but I challenge you to find the post in which I made that exact comment... Prove it Or Just Stop Lying.

Regardless... For those who desire the degree of UI customization that Android 3.x affords, it's obviously the better choice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Translation:
"The screen clarity, build quality, and performance are not as good as the competition, it doesn't run many apps, and there's nothing impressive about it at all, but it was cheap."

That's your misguided 'translation', as I posted exactly what I meant, and meant exactly what I posted as requested by nvidia2008, sans your brand-biased/fanatical input/intervention.


Anyway... Really enjoying my Kindle Fire, consider it one of the most user-friendly and value laden device I've ever owned.
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post #35 of 75
So there's a fundamental problem with this survey. Many of the Kindle Fires were probably given as gifts since it was the holiday season they were first sold in. That would mean those that received them might not have really wanted them in the first place. I gave my parents (both over 80 years in age) a Kindle last February. It was inexpensive enough to give as a gift like the Kindle Fire. They use it once in a while but only load free content when they do use it. I suspect that's a common theme.

I have a Kindle Fire and I am highly satisfied with it because I knew why I was purchasing it - for entertainment purposes only. It was not bought to be a laptop replacement nor a productivity tool. Anyone who thought otherwise will be sadly disappointed. I have purchased a lot of content from Amazon and plan to continue to do so. When I go to replace my Macbook I may consider an iPad or two instead. I really like the Macbook Air so my purchasing an iPad may not happen real soon after all.
post #36 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

- For me, the Kindle Fire's 'value' comes from the fact that for a device so inexpensive yet sacrifices very little in the way of build-quality, screen clarity or performance when compared with any modern tablet device, and both books and magazine subscriptions are very nicely priced.

Every review I've read of the Fire complains about sluggish performance and poor screen quality. Do you feel these reviewers are wrong?

Quote:
- I use all manner of different apps, from light gaming (e;g Cut The Rope, Angry Birds, etc) to web surfing, to Netflix, to HuLu Plus, to lengthy reading sessions of both books and magazines.

The Fires web browser has been reviewed as being quite poor - are you just putting up with that, or are these reviewers wrong again?

Quote:
- No... The Kindle Fire does not run proprietary apps, and every app that is available in the Amazon Appstore the same as the same title found in the Android App Store, as it is (in fact) an Android tablet. NOTE: I even read my NOOK app subscriptions on my Kindle Fire perfectly.

"Proprietary?" I thought Android apps were just that - apps to run on Android. Each app needs to be written and published a second time in order to appear on the Fires app store? Is this an Android tablet or not? Because it sounds like Android is very fragmented, just as was predicted years ago.


Nothing here to indicate the Fire has anything over the iPad than being cheaper in price. If that and the ability to play Angry Birds is you're only metric then I guess it's okay to put up with, but as usual I'll pay a premium for a better quality product.
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My Android phone is the worst phone I've ever owned.
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post #37 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by umumum View Post

for the benefit of the hard of understanding who think amazon is doomed based on only 29% saying they'll spend more, you've got it wrong...

"Research firm ChangeWave conducted a survey in January of over 2,600 North American consumers and learned that, on average, 20 percent of online shoppers plan to spend more money on Amazon.com in the next 90 days. Among Kindle Fire owners, which reached 6 percent of respondents, that number rose to 29 percent, while non-Kindle Fire owners averaged 19 percent."

...it's saying, kindle fire owners are over 52% more likely to spend more money with amazon than non-owners, that sounds pretty good for amazon

Yes, but that's not the issue.

AMZN is (by all reports) selling the Fire at a loss. Even the most optimistic people claim that they might be breaking even on the Fire itself. So AMZN has to recover the losses on the Fire (if any) plus obtain a return on their $200 investment sufficient to justify the program.

Using your own figures, 19% of the people who do NOT have a Fire plan to spend money at Amazon. 29% of the people who do have a Fire plan to do so. So Amazon is getting incremental revenue from only 10% of the people who bought a Fire. Unless those people are spending many hundreds or thousands of dollars each, Amazon loses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellacool View Post

Wow, I didn't get that at all. I will break the news too you, I know several Fire owners and none of them feel the "settled" when purchasing it, including myself. Your analysis is FUD at best. At 2x the price, iPad owners should be 108% very satisfied. I have two iPads that freely sit around my house for all to use, my daughter has a Fire and I have yet seen her put the Fire down and reach for the iPad, it does precisely what she wants and needs without fail, NETFLIX, HULU+, Facebook ect..... I have first hand knowledge of this and personally own one, what do you base your comments on?

So who to believe? You - or the hundreds of reviews, almost every one of which says that the Fire is vastly inferior to the iPad plus the thousands of reports from people who own them and say that the Fire is vastly inferior?
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #38 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycomiko View Post

Has any breakdown of cost ever been confirmed by anybody?

There are price breakdowns of many products.... are they routinely challenged?

Whenever a new product is available... the guys at iFixIt and iSupply open them up and see what's inside.

If you know the parts that are in the device... it's not too hard to find out what those parts cost on the open market.

Sure... it's just an estimate... but it's in the ballpark.
post #39 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by knightlie View Post

Every review I've read of the Fire complains about sluggish performance and poor screen quality. Do you feel these reviewers are wrong?

The Fires web browser has been reviewed as being quite poor - are you just putting up with that, or are these reviewers wrong again?

"Proprietary?" I thought Android apps were just that - apps to run on Android. Each app needs to be written and published a second time in order to appear on the Fires app store? Is this an Android tablet or not? Because it sounds like Android is very fragmented, just as was predicted years ago.

Nothing here to indicate the Fire has anything over the iPad than being cheaper in price. If that and the ability to play Angry Birds is you're only metric then I guess it's okay to put up with, but as usual I'll pay a premium for a better quality product.

First: Your name is NOT nvidia2008, who happens to be the individual asking me the questions for which I provided answers based upon my ownership of the device.

Second: Never once was I asked to make a comparison between my Kindle Fire and my iPad/iPad2, so I merely provided answers (again) based upon my ownership of the device i.e. my Kindle Fire

Third: nvidia2008 specifically asked, "how hard is it to port Android apps to Fire apps", to which I responded by informing him that, "The Kindle Fire does not run proprietary apps, and every app that is available in the Amazon Appstore the same as the same title found in the Android App Store"... Which they are.

Friendly Suggestion: Please take the time to understand the context of a post before responding with such contrary nonsense.
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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post #40 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellacool View Post

I bought my daughter one and she loves it. The number one thing for her is the size. She can slip it into her purse and take it anywhere with out issue. She is 14 years old and only wanted the ability to surf, read, email and Facebook, this provides all that and more and a fraction of the cost.

Your 14-year-old daughter carries a purse?
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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