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Apple streaming Tim Cook's speech at Goldman Sachs Conference - Page 2

post #41 of 51
Glass half full or half empty? This dude is definitely the half empty type. He prefers to get on his high horse of self-righteousness, appoint himself the arbiter of the moral high ground and try to shame Apple into complying with his agenda. Or maybe he just gets off on pontificating because it makes him feel superior. Does he really care for the Chinese? I doubt it. I mean, not really. All that aside, however, nobody is being forced to do anything. The Chinese are not being forced against their will to work at Foxconn. It beats the rice fields. And surely their economy benefits from Apple's presence there. Consumers, too, are benefitting - they LOVE their Apple stuff. Everybody wins, except Apple's competitors. So, Mr Negative, go preach your gospel somewhere else. It just doesn't fly here. It lacks substance. You'd be better off spending your energies protesting Wall Street, or helping drug addicts. Join the Peace Corp or build somebody a house if they deserve it. Go someplace where you are needed and where you can make a significant difference. DO something good YOURSELF. Don't just excel at the art of telling others how much they fall short, cause that's about the lowest form of moral development I can think of.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rbryanh View Post

When you need to distract from the fact that what you're about to say is transparently the opposite of the truth, always begin by frowning with abject sincerity and saying "very, very"

Our corporate masters attend the same school of rhetoric as the elected officials they pay to put and keep in office: the Madison Avenue School. Whether it be child labor, war, or wrinkle cream, the truth in America is whatever most people hear most of the time. If their operators follow the model of the American government, no doubt electronics companies will shortly claim to be "liberating" the children being poisoned in order to supply us all with more toys. It's like the power of prayer: one need only repeat something often enough to make it real.

But perhaps I do Mr. Cook an injustice. Famous quotes like "Those jobs won't be coming back" make it clear Apple and all the rest do indeed take externalizing the blood, sweat, and tears of their vast profits "very, very seriously." After all, one certainly doesn't accumulate a $100B slush fund by taking exploitation frivolously. Only true passion can achieve such miracles.

Oh Apple It isn't that customers are unwilling to pay twice as much for your goods: it's that the hoarders who run our society correctly regard anyone who can even entertain the concept of "enough" as a threat to life as they know it. Never mind that you're arguably the best of a bad bunch. Never mind that it's unfair to scapegoat you for the failings of an entire society. You have the power to improve this situation, and therefore an inescapable obligation to do so. This is an opportunity to do something no quantity of clever electronics can ever achieve: to really make a difference.

Alternatively, I suppose Mr. Cook might try to explain how "think different' works with the rich getting richer by jumping up and down on the backs of the poor. It's difficult to imagine a less original idea. Increasingly, Apple resembles a mealy-mouthed family values politician caught giving a bj to an underage boy in a truck stop bathroom.
post #42 of 51
Yes, some of the expressions reminded me of Steve. But, I almost hate to say this, did anyone notice that the actual tonal quality of his voice matches Bill Gates more than it does Steve Jobs?

Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

At times if you mentally took out the southern accent you could here the cadences of Steve. The way he would introduce a concept with "Turns out" and then tell the story of Apple, their motivations and reasons. Always coming back to the product. And I had to smile when he used Steve's old "high order bit" turn of phrase to mean "most important thing."

But he also brings a folksiness that Steve lacked. I could imagine an Apple with Tim as the public face that was "friendlier"-- more approachable, more human. For instance he wound up an impassioned reply to the potential of the iPad with "well, that's my opinion, others may disagree."
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aportfoliodoctor.com View Post

If I were him I would take 10% of my cash stash or stock 10 billion or so and acquire Twitter to be #1 instantly in Social Networking. Adding Twitter to the Apple stable of winners before Google gets it would INSTANTLY
add billions of value to the stock that wouldincrease expnonentially over time.

Apparently you missed the part of this Q&A where Cook talked about focusing on Apple customers and having the self restraint and discipline to do a few things very well.

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by macguru View Post

Yes, some of the expressions reminded me of Steve. But, I almost hate to say this, did anyone notice that the actual tonal quality of his voice matches Bill Gates more than it does Steve Jobs?

Jobs wasn't a baritone either.
post #45 of 51
Very impressive. Tim is the right guy at the right time for Apple. Crystal clear goals and approaches

Windows survivor - after a long, epic and painful struggle. Very long AAPL

Reply

Windows survivor - after a long, epic and painful struggle. Very long AAPL

Reply
post #46 of 51
I liked hearing Tim get animated at the 26-minute mark.

I felt like I could hear the passion he has for Apple. It's reassuring to know that Steve's successor loves the company like he did.
post #47 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbryanh View Post

When you need to distract from the fact that what you're about to say is transparently the opposite of the truth, always begin by frowning with abject sincerity and saying "very, very"

Our corporate masters attend the same school of rhetoric as the elected officials they pay to put and keep in office: the Madison Avenue School. Whether it be child labor, war, or wrinkle cream, the truth in America is whatever most people hear most of the time. If their operators follow the model of the American government, no doubt electronics companies will shortly claim to be "liberating" the children being poisoned in order to supply us all with more toys. It's like the power of prayer: one need only repeat something often enough to make it real.

But perhaps I do Mr. Cook an injustice. Famous quotes like "Those jobs won't be coming back" make it clear Apple and all the rest do indeed take externalizing the blood, sweat, and tears of their vast profits "very, very seriously." After all, one certainly doesn't accumulate a $100B slush fund by taking exploitation frivolously. Only true passion can achieve such miracles.

Oh Apple It isn't that customers are unwilling to pay twice as much for your goods: it's that the hoarders who run our society correctly regard anyone who can even entertain the concept of "enough" as a threat to life as they know it. Never mind that you're arguably the best of a bad bunch. Never mind that it's unfair to scapegoat you for the failings of an entire society. You have the power to improve this situation, and therefore an inescapable obligation to do so. This is an opportunity to do something no quantity of clever electronics can ever achieve: to really make a difference.

Alternatively, I suppose Mr. Cook might try to explain how "think different' works with the rich getting richer by jumping up and down on the backs of the poor. It's difficult to imagine a less original idea. Increasingly, Apple resembles a mealy-mouthed family values politician caught giving a bj to an underage boy in a truck stop bathroom.

Could solve all the problems by debasing the Federal Reserve Note to nothing.
Could bring all of those jobs back to states and use the underutilized legal slave labor of incarcerates.
Could solve the problem by compelling people to take an alternative route.
Please do.
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbryanh View Post

When you need to distract from the fact that what you're about to say is transparently the opposite of the truth, always begin by frowning with abject sincerity and saying "very, very" ..
But perhaps I do Mr. Cook an injustice. Famous quotes like "Those jobs won't be coming back" make it clear Apple and all the rest do indeed take externalizing the blood, sweat, and tears of their vast profits "very, very seriously." After all, one certainly doesn't accumulate a $100B slush fund by taking exploitation frivolously. Only true passion can achieve such miracles.

...

You tell em. and add World Peace, a zero calorie chocolate , and teleportation. And we want it all for $14.95 or less.... RIGHT NOW or I will hold my breath until I turn blue....

Sheeeze.. Totally NO grasp of what makes the world spin. :-(

Just a thought,
en
post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by macguru View Post

Glass half full or half empty? This dude is definitely the half empty type. He prefers to get on his high horse of self-righteousness, appoint himself the arbiter of the moral high ground and try to shame Apple into complying with his agenda. Or maybe he just gets off on pontificating because it makes him feel superior. Does he really care for the Chinese? I doubt it. I mean, not really. All that aside, however, nobody is being forced to do anything. The Chinese are not being forced against their will to work at Foxconn. It beats the rice fields. And surely their economy benefits from Apple's presence there. Consumers, too, are benefitting - they LOVE their Apple stuff. Everybody wins, except Apple's competitors. So, Mr Negative, go preach your gospel somewhere else. It just doesn't fly here. It lacks substance. You'd be better off spending your energies protesting Wall Street, or helping drug addicts. Join the Peace Corp or build somebody a house if they deserve it. Go someplace where you are needed and where you can make a significant difference. DO something good YOURSELF. Don't just excel at the art of telling others how much they fall short, cause that's about the lowest form of moral development I can think of.

I disagree to an extent. I can't possibly be alone in my view that Apple frequently takes an accepted moral principle, adopts it as its own, and then accuses mainstream society of violating that principle. More than anything else, such beliefs shed light on Apple's moral values and suggest incontrovertibly that it expects us to behave like passive sheep. The only choice Apple believes we should be allowed to make for ourselves is whether to head towards its slaughterhouse at a trot or at a gallop. It truly doesn't want us choosing to shine a bright light on its theatrics, which flourish mainly in the darkness of scapegoatism. Meanwhile, it has blood on it's hands in collaboration with Foxconn.

Now, I'm going to be honest here: Apple is not just prudish. It is unbelievably, astronomically prudish. We find among narrow and uneducated minds the belief that we'll be moved by some heartfelt words on the glories of particularism. This belief is due to a basic confusion that can be cleared up simply by stating that Apple is interpersonally exploitative. That is, it takes advantage of others to achieve its own frightful ends. Why does it do that? I hardly know. But I will stake the immortality of my soul that I'm not actually demanding revenge. If, after hearing facts like that, you still believe that Apple's précis can give us deeper insights into the nature of reality, then there is really no hope for you. In closing, all that I ask is that you join me to stop Apple and build a true community of spirit and purpose based on mutual respect and caring, and not the morally depraved, exploitation and callous abuse of the Chinese people.
post #50 of 51
I really, really like Tim. Have since I learned about it. I feel this company is in just as good of hands with him as it was with Steve, speaking in the near-long term (next 3-4 years, at least). Part of Steve's brilliance was knowing who to instill trust and delegate responsibility to.

I hear Steve's swagger and confidence, "otherworldly yet can back it up" tone via reading the transcript. I dig that, it's necessary for Apple.
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by am8449 View Post

I liked hearing Tim get animated at the 26-minute mark.

I felt like I could hear the passion he has for Apple. It's reassuring to know that Steve's successor loves the company like he did.

Yeah, it seems he was a good choice for the role. His presence is usually very understated but it's unwavering - never flusters nor has a hair out of place (seriously, check the photos - it looks painted on). He does project a very good sense of ethics, though I'm still not sold on the humour. Most of the keynotes are very dry. Still, that's not such a big deal.

It was interesting to hear about how they definitely won't be making a TV and also that they are having trouble coming up with ideas on how to spend their money wisely. I think they are making a good choice not to spend it just because they have it.
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