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Tim Cook admits Apple may further converge iOS & OS X, Macs could run on ARM CPUs

post #1 of 105
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While he didn't hint at any definitive future plans, Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook did admit that all options are on the table for the future of the Mac operating system, including further converging iOS and OS X, as well as potentially running Macs on ARM processors like are found in the iPhone and iPad, or switching iOS to Intel.

Cook's comments come from a new interview with The Wall Street Journal, in which he discussed the future of the Mac platform with the forthcoming Mountain Lion operating system update. The CEO said he already views iOS and OS X as "one with incremental functionality," though he expects both to continue to coexist.

As for whether they could converge even more, and further blur the lines between the two operating systems, Cook reportedly didn't rule out that option. And he also admitted that Macs could eventually run the same chips as the iPhone and iPad — whether ARM comes to the Mac, or iOS devices transition to Intel processors.

"We think about everything," Cook said. "We don't close things off."

Mountain Lion, set to be released later this summer, represents an even closer unification of OS X and iOS, as many features found on the iPad will transition over to the Mac. They include Notification Center and iCloud, as well as specific applications like Messages, Reminders and Game Center.

Even existing OS X applications have been renamed to match with their iOS counterparts, as Address Book will become Contacts, and iCal will be known as Calendar. The changes follow a plan set in motion with last year's release of OS X 10.7 Lion, which was heralded for bringing iPad and iOS features "Back to the Mac," as Apple promoted it.




Thursday's report from the Journal also hinted at Apple's rumored upcoming television set when mentioning the AirPlay Mirroring feature that will be included in Mountain Lion, and will allow users to wirelessly broadcast their Mac screen to an Apple TV on the same network. It noted that the addition of AirPlay is "highly strategic for Apple, as it contemplates new technologies for the living room."

Cook also made note of how the Mac is gaining traction in China, where the iPhone has been a resounding success and consumers are now looking to Apple's other products. Enhanced support in Mountain Lion for Chinese-language users was one addition highlighted by Apple in Thursday's announcement, as OS X 10.8 will include Baidu search in Safari, compatibility with e-mail services like QQ, 126 and 163, and Share Sheets connectivity with Youku and Toudou.

Finally, Cook declined to hint at future plans for Mac hardware, though he did praise the MacBook Air as one device that the rest of the PC industry is desperately trying to copy. AppleInsider indicated last week that Apple is planning to radically redesign its MacBook Pro lineup this year with a new lineup that will look much more like the current MacBook Air offerings.

[ View article on AppleInsider ]
post #2 of 105
Hmmmm..... TMI, Cook, TMI.
post #3 of 105
I am not a fan of iOS on a Mac PC.

Making the OS stupid proof.
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post #4 of 105
Fascinating! I like the integation of iOS on the Mac....just the syncing and Mac App store are amazing!.

The future is, more and more Apple users will have an iphone, iPad and most likely an MBA or even an iMac as well and eventually an Apple TV. And having a "family resemblance" of Apple's devices is the way to go!


Also, for those interested, this week's macworld podcast is about mountain lion...very interesting!

http://www.macworld.com/article/1654...n_the_way.html
post #5 of 105
I almost think it would make more sense for Apple to transition iOS to Intel, down the road of course. ARM works great right now, but has little competition given that Intel fell asleep from ingesting too much money in the 90's and early 21st century.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but LightPeak/Thunderbolt doesn't work on ARM, but would if Apple transitioned to Intel, say 5 years down the road.
post #6 of 105
I will continue to say that I do see an eventual convergence of the two. Not in the way MS is going with Win 8, that's just a mess, and is a result of them having no credible OS for tablets, and thus, no presence in that space. So they have to force the Metro UI on their users all at once.

Apple doesn't have that problem of course, and so they can take their time.

But what I see is a graduated response from them. In other words, we'll see the same OS, but it will have differing levels depending on the device it will run upon. The simplest will be for phones and Touches, then more will be seen on tablets, and finally, everything will be available on more traditional computers.

This will make for an easy transition between the varying levels of devices, as people should expect. No one will want to fully edit a long, complex document on a phone or Touch, but they may want to look through parts of it and make some notes, and a few corrections. On the iPad, they would want to do more, and should be able to, when on the road. But when used on a notebook or desktop, the full ability should be available, along with all the notes and corrections from the other devices.

The same thing might be done with Keynote, for example. The entire presentation could easily be done on a "computer", or possible even on an iPad, but in reviewing it on their phone, from which the presentation may be given, using Airplay through a projector, they may want to alter backgrounds, and a few other minor matters at the last moment.

Programs, apps, or whatever they will be called will have each more sophisticated, and larger device see a superset of the feature set of the device below it, thus allowing a smooth increase in power where appropriate.

Apple is doing this now, with what we are seeing in Mountain Lion. It just makes sense.
post #7 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post

I almost think it would make more sense for Apple to transition iOS to Intel, down the road of course. ARM works great right now, but has little competition given that Intel fell asleep from ingesting too much money in the 90's and early 21st century.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but LightPeak/Thunderbolt doesn't work on ARM, but would if Apple transitioned to Intel, say 5 years down the road.

LightPeak is a part of the Express Buss specification. It's an actual extension of the EB outside of the machine. If a device uses an Express Bus, it can have LightPeak as well.
post #8 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

I am not a fan of iOS on a Mac PC.

Making the OS stupid proof.

You have to read what he said intelligently. IOS will not become the new MacOS. They will converge further - obviously and surely not a bad thing?

MacOS may run on Arm chips in the future - surely not a bad thing?

"We think about everything," Cook said. "We don't close things off" - surely not a bad thing.
post #9 of 105
Yeah, we'll eventually have a multitouch desktop OS that is operated in a way as different from the current keyboard/mouse paradigm as adding the mouse was from the keyboard/screen paradigm. I buy that.

But it better darn well be an OS that happens to run on phones and tablets, not the other way around. We need a file manager (and this is where Apple will really shine. They'll create something brand new here; an entirely new way of organizing and looking at your files) and to retain the rest of the features that make OS X OS X while incorporating the incredible potential of multitouch that makes iOS iOS.

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There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #10 of 105
For a good article about 10.8, if that's what it will be called, see this article from PCmag. It's interesting that the PC oriented sites have, for the past few years, been giving Apple products really good press. Some of the readers aren't happy, but it is what it is.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2400311,00.asp
post #11 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

.....It's interesting that the PC oriented sites have, for the past few years, been giving Apple products really good press.

I've noticed that, too!
post #12 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Hmmmm..... TMI, Cook, TMI.

Exactly my thoughts. STFU Cook!
post #13 of 105
"We think about everything" : Is there another CEO in this business who can say this without being immediately ridiculized ?
post #14 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I will continue to say that I do see an eventual convergence of the two. Not in the way MS is going with Win 8, that's just a mess, and is a result of them having no credible OS for tablets, and thus, no presence in that space. So they have to force the Metro UI on their users all at once.

Apple doesn't have that problem of course, and so they can take their time.

But what I see is a graduated response from them. In other words, we'll see the same OS, but it will have differing levels depending on the device it will run upon. The simplest will be for phones and Touches, then more will be seen on tablets, and finally, everything will be available on more traditional computers.

This will make for an easy transition between the varying levels of devices, as people should expect. No one will want to fully edit a long, complex document on a phone or Touch, but they may want to look through parts of it and make some notes, and a few corrections. On the iPad, they would want to do more, and should be able to, when on the road. But when used on a notebook or desktop, the full ability should be available, along with all the notes and corrections from the other devices.

The same thing might be done with Keynote, for example. The entire presentation could easily be done on a "computer", or possible even on an iPad, but in reviewing it on their phone, from which the presentation may be given, using Airplay through a projector, they may want to alter backgrounds, and a few other minor matters at the last moment.

Programs, apps, or whatever they will be called will have each more sophisticated, and larger device see a superset of the feature set of the device below it, thus allowing a smooth increase in power where appropriate.

Apple is doing this now, with what we are seeing in Mountain Lion. It just makes sense.

I am not sure what you are saying here. Except for the last sentence. IOS is a derivative of OSX. In many ways that makes them the same OS but "with different levels", as you put it. So what they are doing is converging the two further visually and functionally.

But maybe one day when the storage capacity of the iPhone is big enough, and the processors fast enough, The full MacOS will in fact be on the phone (but with an IOS GUI). Then, when you get to a large screen device you can insert or plug in you phone and it basically becomes the computer's cpu and hd. Neat, eh?
post #15 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

I am not a fan of iOS on a Mac PC.

Making the OS stupid proof.

Really - how do you use the appliances in your house then? If TVs were such that you had to enter the frequency of the station directly into your remote rather than channel number, would you complain when TVs got channel numbers instead.

I say, make it as stupid proof as possible without impeding the tasks that you bought the computer to do in the first place. There's still a lot that can be done before that happens.
post #16 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post

I almost think it would make more sense for Apple to transition iOS to Intel, down the road of course.

I'm skeptical of that. The great advantage that Intel used to have was its unequaled size, which made it the only company with the financial resources to make the massive investments needed to stay at the cutting edge of fab technology. But now Apple has enough cash on hand to build *20* cutting edge fabs. Granted, Apple doesn't currently have the staff or the IP to do that. But Apple definitely has the money necessary to make a CPU supplier competitive with Intel over the long haul.

So you take away that economic advantage from Intel, and what does Intel have? The advantage of x86 has always been PC software compatibility, but that's irrelevant here. So what's left? Well, Intel employs some smart chip designers. But I doubt Intel has a monopoly on smart chip designers.

And Intel has some big disadvantages, at least from Apple's point of view. First, Intel likes to sell the same chips to everyone whereas Apple wants to differentiate its products. Second, so long as Apple relies on Intel Apple is subject to Intel's whims. For example, Intel has apparently decided to delay Ivy Bridge because its PC customers haven't sold through all the Sandy Bridge inventory. I'm sure Apple just *loves* that.

ARM isn't ready to replace x86 in Macs today, and it won't be ready next year, or maybe even the year after that. But by 2016 or so I can imagine that Apple's in-house CPU design efforts, combined with significant investments in their CPU supply chain, might yield a competitively designed chip fabbed using a cutting-edge process that has some unique Apple-only features. At that point, Apple might move from x86 to their own custom ARM.
post #17 of 105
Nothing really to see here.

Same article 7 years ago simply replaced ARM with Intel.

ARM's moving upscale with more power hungry and powerful processors and Intel is moving downscale with low power mobile processing.

Apple would be foolish not to explore the idea.
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post #18 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

I am not a fan of iOS on a Mac PC.

Making the OS stupid proof.

So far I don't think this is true at all. Why would I not want the OSX messaging app to be consistent with the iOS app? What's wrong with auto-save and auto-restore of windows?

I have yet to see an example of a technology or UI concept brought from iOS to OSX that has made me worse off. I can still run my open source unixy software from terminal -- which I do -- while gaining some of the advantages of iOS.

The only gripe I can see about the "iOS-ificiation" of OSX is that it might shift resources/efforts away from improving the X-specific aspects of OSX. For example, it would be nice to see some advances in the file system for power users, not just for users who want to only see files from within an app.

But I see no example of cases where Apple has taken away important features and replaced them with crippled iOS alternatives. If we wake up one day and can no longer go into terminal or open a Finder window, then we'll have something to complain about. But so far, I don't see the complaint.
post #19 of 105
Yes, processor shifts CAN happen, and Apple has proven they’re not stupid about planning for them “just in case.”

But then all your apps stop working or need emulation. So think of it as an emergency option that will likely not be needed; certainly not soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

...But I see no example of cases where Apple has taken away important features and replaced them with crippled iOS alternatives. If we wake up one day and can no longer go into terminal or open a Finder window, then we'll have something to complain about. But so far, I don't see the complaint.

Exactly! In fact, Gatekeeper is a pleasant surprise for tinkerers/fiddlers/hackers or anyone afraid we might one day be App-Store-only. Not only does it make explicit that non-App Store apps ARE still an option... they’re allowed by default. (But not from ALL sources without changing a simple setting. The perfect compromise config for initial installations.)

Mountain Lion seems to be the best of both worlds: ease, speed, and security for 99% of regular, non-techie people who want to USE their computer, not manage it under the hood (and yes, that includes managing filesystems). Yet at the same time, all the power and flexibility we tech-nerds love is here to stay!
post #20 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

I am not a fan of iOS on a Mac PC.

Making the OS stupid proof.

Where did he say that?

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post #21 of 105
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Originally Posted by paxman View Post

I am not sure what you are saying here. Except for the last sentence. IOS is a derivative of OSX. In many ways that makes them the same OS but "with different levels", as you put it. So what they are doing is converging the two further visually and functionally.

But maybe one day when the storage capacity of the iPhone is big enough, and the processors fast enough, The full MacOS will in fact be on the phone (but with an IOS GUI). Then, when you get to a large screen device you can insert or plug in you phone and it basically becomes the computer's cpu and hd. Neat, eh?

There are a lot if people who have been saying, for several years now, that Apple won't converge the two OS's at all, and that it would be a bad idea. I've been saying, from the beginning, that they will. I've pointed out the origins of both, but that seemed to be thought to be of little significance. Now that Apple beginning (with Lion, mostly) to merge various functions and features, it's becoming more obvious to others that this is indeed happening. But Apple is still, for the most part, telling us that they will remain seperate.

I don't think that they will remain seperate. I think that even more code will converge. I even think that we will buy an app, likely from the App Store for this to happen, that will install on any of your devices, iOS, or otherwise, but just installing elements that will function on that particular device.

So we may see Pages install on every Apple device from just one purchase, but just load what will work on that device, be it a desktop, or a Touch. Fat Binaries is something Apple is quite familiar with, and so even if they are still using two processor families, it will work, just loading the binary needed on that platform.

This will make for a very smooth universe of devices.
post #22 of 105
Way to go Apple! Always thinking out of the box...innovation at it's peak man.
post #23 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

I am not a fan of iOS on a Mac PC.

Making the OS stupid proof.

This only shows how out of touch you are with Apple. It's got nothing to do with being stupid proof and everything to do with great design.
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post #24 of 105
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Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

[...] "We think about everything," Cook said. "We don't close things off."

What he said: We think about everything.

What he meant: You're damn right we're going to use ARM chips in Macs.

There are far too many directly quantifiable advantages to switching to ARM. E.g. lower CPU chip cost, lower power consumption, mechanical simplicity (no cooling fans), fewer components, etc. But the priceless, intangible advantage is freedom from Intel and its symbiosis with Microsoft. Apple suffered for many years during its unhappy co-dependence on slow-moving Motorola and IBM for their PowerPC chips.

The only major roadblock to transitioning, say, the MacBook Air line to ARM-based chips, is that no ARM chips have 64-bit data paths. Yet. ARM announced the ARMv8 64-bit architecture last October, and they expect to release the full spec this year. But once Apple releases a 64-bit ARM SoC, there will be no reason to stay with Intel on the consumer MacBooks.

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post #25 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


....Programs, apps, or whatever they will be called will have each more sophisticated, and larger device see a superset of the feature set of the device below it, thus allowing a smooth increase in power where appropriate.....

Indeed .. Plus the fact that there is a preferred input device/mean of communication for each of the devices of Apple's world : voice for iPhones, gestures for iPad, mouse/keyboard actions for Macs (although not totally exclusive, of course)
post #26 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

You have to read what he said intelligently. IOS will not become the new MacOS. They will converge further - obviously and surely not a bad thing?

First off I have intelligence and 25 years of IT, VM and Data Center experience and have watched a lot of MFG's do this same thing not just Microsoft ,so if you would be so kind as to refrain from taking pop shots and being condescending, please.

You say that iOS will not become the MacOS, how do you know this?

There is more evidence that they are moving MacOS in the direction of iOS than not.

They are replacing apps with in OS X with iOS versions slowly converting OS X to iOS via a slow and methodical transition.

However, for arguments sake I will give you your premiss that the two OS's will remain separate.

They are still dumbing down MacOS which is "obviously and surely a bad thing".


Go ahead and toast me up.

I hate to say this but maybe it is time for an OS X Lite or home version.
Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away. - GC
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post #27 of 105
Overly sensational reporting, AI. The WSJ implies nothing of the sort. Mr. Cook's response is a classic standard Apple non-answer that anyone familiar with the investor calls has heard a million times. He'd respond the same if asked if Apple was going to go for a moon-shot. "We don't rule it out".
post #28 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Yeah, we'll eventually have a multitouch desktop OS that is operated in a way as different from the current keyboard/mouse paradigm as adding the mouse was from the keyboard/screen paradigm.

You could use the word eventually about everything. But ultimately the keyboard and mouse seems to be still the most efficient way to do certain tasks, and for the ones where it's not you have devices like phones and tablets. I don't see what you are talking about happening for a long time, if ever. I don't see touch screen desktop computers being more efficient. That's what it comes down to. I see tablets in the next 10 years or thereabouts killing off laptops, possibly, but not desktops. But then when you think about that what would journalist out-in-the-field and people who need to type a lot and do many tasks at once while no the move use? A touch screen phone or tablet? Probably not. These things are nigh impossible to predict.

I do know one prediction that is destined to happen however; the integrating TV set-top-box and games console. In 15 years people with laugh at the idea that you need three or four separate devices to do all of those things, and I see Apple with the best chance to conquer that market.
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post #29 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

There are a lot if people who have been saying, for several years now, that Apple won't converge the two OS's at all, and that it would be a bad idea. I've been saying, from the beginning, that they will.

I don't see that happening or how it makes sense. Why do I need to have the iOS UIs on my Mac or have the Mac Aqua UI hidden in within every iDevice? You don't there is simply no need for them to converse into one OS.

Now convergent aspects across their different OSes is another story and how iOS started. They scaled back Mac OS X to a core version of OS X that all system could use then diverged iOS from that. They've since shared back and forth along the way with the commonality of iOS-based devices clearly being pushed to the Mac to make it more familiar.

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post #30 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Yeah, we'll eventually have a multitouch desktop OS that is operated in a way as different from the current keyboard/mouse paradigm as adding the mouse was from the keyboard/screen paradigm. I buy that.

Humans invented tools because killing wooly mammoths with your bare hands was a tad clumsy.

Likewise tools such as a mouse or a stylus, gives you finer control than using your fingers alone.

The OS may evolve the use of finger gestures over time but I seriously doubt it will become the primary input method for anything other than flipping and scrolling digital pages.

The reason it makes sense on a mobile device is because you are likely to misplace your stylus, however, it makes the usability dumbed down to the lowest common denominator.

I think a mouse or stylus plus a keyboard are necessary features on a desktop computer. Not that a touch pad is totally useless, but is not really suitable for advanced computing.

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post #31 of 105
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Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

You could use the word eventually about everything.

LOL That's funny considering you've been talking about an Apple HDTV for 7 years.

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post #32 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

They are still dumbing down MacOS which is "obviously and surely a bad thing".


Go ahead and toast me up.

I hate to say this but maybe it is time for an OS X Lite or home version.

Sorry to cut your post, just did it to save space.

I'm interested in the point that they are dumbing down MacOS. In what ways do you think they are? I honestly can't think of anything I can't do now that I could do 8 years ago when I switched to Mac. Granted there are things that I no longer do. I don't do much in the way of manual backup anymore for example, since Time Machine is doing it for me. I don't have to goto websites to look for application updates anymore, because the Mac App Store tells me.

I don't see that as dumbing down. I see that as them fixing some of the frankly ridiculous things that computers should have been able to do for themselves, but could not.
post #33 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

LOL That's funny considering you've been talking about an Apple HDTV for 7 years.

Haha, I knew someone would bring that up. Do you disagree that Apple is working on an integrated TV, though? Steve even hinted at D a couple of years ago that the iPhone and iPad were more important. So it's not as if they had no interest in doing a TV, it's just that they are too focused-a-company to attempt too many tasks at once. TV is their next main area of focus. Besides, the main thing that's slowing down that project is the fact that they are finding it near impossible to convince the powers that be to give them a subscription content deal.

My main wishes for the TV after they get the subscription deal in place (and no question they should buy the Sky Sports rights) are a bluetooth remote control, no HDMI ports deliberately, Pioneer Kuro quality built-in speakers, and a huge one for me is a dedicated physical games controller. If they try to pawn the iPad to iPhone off as touch screen game controllers for gaming on iTV I will be highly disappointed.

The day my living room and entertainment setup is one TV (with all content via a subscription package), no extra boxes or wires, one TV remote and separate dedicated hardware gaming controllers is the day we can welcome the next 50 years of the living room.
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post #34 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Humans invented tools because killing wooly mammoths with your bare hands was a tad clumsy.

Likewise tools such as a mouse or a stylus, gives you finer control than using your fingers alone.

The OS may evolve the use of finger gestures over time but I seriously doubt it will become the primary input method for anything other than flipping and scrolling digital pages.

The reason it makes sense on a mobile device is because you are likely to misplace your stylus, however, it makes the usability dumbed down to the lowest common denominator.

I think a mouse or stylus plus a keyboard are necessary features on a desktop computer. Not that a touch pad is totally useless, but is not really suitable for advanced computing.

I wonder what might be possible with something like Kinect when married to interfacing with a desktop type computer.

One thing is for sure, at some point something will come along that we hadn't thought of, and it will completely surprise us, in the same way the mouse did all those years ago.
post #35 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

Sorry to cut your post, just did it to save space.

I'm interested in the point that they are dumbing down MacOS. In what ways do you think they are?

They renamed Address Book to Contacts and iCal to Calander. I guess they thought we were too stupid to know these apps did the same thing between Mac OS and iOS¡

Seriously, I can't understand why so many can't see why Apple is making Mac OS more familiar to the average user. So many comments across so many sites that Mountain Lion is proof that Apple doesn't care about the Mac when in fact it's the opposite. They are showing they want to capitalize on their iOS popularity by making the Mac more familiar to non-Mac users.

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post #36 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Haha, I knew someone would bring that up. Do you disagree that Apple is working on an integrated TV, though?

I assume I was only short list of name, too.

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post #37 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I will continue to say that I do see an eventual convergence of the two. Not in the way MS is going with Win 8, that's just a mess, and is a result of them having no credible OS for tablets, and thus, no presence in that space. So they have to force the Metro UI on their users all at once.

Apple doesn't have that problem of course, and so they can take their time.

"I don't really think anything Microsoft does puts pressure on Apple," said Mr. Cook, who said Apple is focused on building the best product and the pressure on the company is "self-induced."

Quote:
But what I see is a graduated response from them. In other words, we'll see the same OS, but it will have differing levels depending on the device it will run upon. The simplest will be for phones and Touches, then more will be seen on tablets, and finally, everything will be available on more traditional computers.

This will make for an easy transition between the varying levels of devices, as people should expect. No one will want to fully edit a long, complex document on a phone or Touch, but they may want to look through parts of it and make some notes, and a few corrections. On the iPad, they would want to do more, and should be able to, when on the road. But when used on a notebook or desktop, the full ability should be available, along with all the notes and corrections from the other devices.

The same thing might be done with Keynote, for example. The entire presentation could easily be done on a "computer", or possible even on an iPad, but in reviewing it on their phone, from which the presentation may be given, using Airplay through a projector, they may want to alter backgrounds, and a few other minor matters at the last moment.

Programs, apps, or whatever they will be called will have each more sophisticated, and larger device see a superset of the feature set of the device below it, thus allowing a smooth increase in power where appropriate.

Apple is doing this now, with what we are seeing in Mountain Lion. It just makes sense.

Absolutely spot on!

In a way, it is an extension of the "universal app" -- where the OS and apps with a single code base (and possible a single "package" will download and install/configure only what is necessary on a particular device -- from an iPod to a Mac -- and anything below, above or in between.

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post #38 of 105
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Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

First off I have intelligence and 25 years of IT, VM and Data Center experience and have watched a lot of MFG's do this same thing not just Microsoft ,so if you would be so kind as to refrain from taking pop shots and being condescending, please.

You say that iOS will not become the MacOS, how do you know this?

There is more evidence that they are moving MacOS in the direction of iOS than not.

They are replacing apps with in OS X with iOS versions slowly converting OS X to iOS via a slow and methodical transition.

However, for arguments sake I will give you your premiss that the two OS's will remain separate.

They are still dumbing down MacOS which is "obviously and surely a bad thing".


Go ahead and toast me up.

I hate to say this but maybe it is time for an OS X Lite or home version.

I have already posted in other threads about this so sorry for repeating.... but Mac OS and IOS are, afaik, essentially the same core OS. IOS being a derivative of OSX. They are built upon the same foundations.

But the Mac experience is so different that it would make no sense to make it limited to an IOS GUI. Just because you are able to view iMovie in Full Screen mode, it doesn't mean that it is dumbed down or IOS like. The menus are all still available. Menus that I think it unlikely will become available in the IOS version of the App for obvious reasons.

Apple is not replacing OSX with IOS, that is the wrong way to look at it.

How is OSX being dumbed down? Give me a few examples of things you can no longer do as a result of dumbing down.

Re OSX lite, there already is such a thing and it is called SimpleFinder. It is built into the OS and can be invoked through settings. It doesn't turn OSX into IOS but it is a simplified view of the OS with limited permissions. Maybe Apple will make Simple Finder look like IOS. I think that would be a great idea, personally.

Oh, and your first point... my apologies. Pot shots uncalled for. I just get a little jumpy when I see this IOS / OSX alarmism. .
post #39 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I don't see that happening or how it makes sense. Why do I need to have the iOS UIs on my Mac or have the Mac Aqua UI hidden in within every iDevice? You don't there is simply no need for them to converse into one OS.

Now convergent aspects across their different OSes is another story and how iOS started. They scaled back Mac OS X to a core version of OS X that all system could use then diverged iOS from that. They've since shared back and forth along the way with the commonality of iOS-based devices clearly being pushed to the Mac to make it more familiar.

I can see your point
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post #40 of 105
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Originally Posted by paxman View Post

I have already posted in other threads about this so sorry for repeating.... but Mac OS and IOS are, afaik, essentially the same core OS. IOS being a derivative of OSX. They are built upon the same foundations.

Gruber points out that Apple is now calling Mac OS X simply OS X. I wonder if that means they will start to focus on a consumer notebook and desktop line that aren't called Macs.

Either way, it looks like this sub-Mac OS X/post-Darwin OS they once referred to as OS X is now being rebranded. I guess we'll have to find a different term for the core system that they both share. I think I'll use xOS and see if that catches on.

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