or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › With Mountain Lion, Apple officially drops 'Mac' from OS X name
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

With Mountain Lion, Apple officially drops 'Mac' from OS X name - Page 3

post #81 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljocampo View Post

They might not be calling it CocoaTouch but it's all Cocoa. Apple wants everything Cocoa. I am happy about that too because I won't develop in anything else. I'm Apple all the way and don't use any software that is multiplatform (Windows like) if I can help it. Made for Mac ummm \ iOS by true Apple gardeners is the way to go IMO.

As for the cursor being less accurate, it is all the time. Not a bug. Apple is going the way of Touch, even on the desktop OS and they purposely increased the bounding box to accommodate fingers but the overlap in the UI of the curser suffers now from it. I need to get use to hitting the point with the cursor because since 10.7.3 it's different. It's not a biggy just annoying for me because I use a mouse exclusively.

1) Cocoa was around long before Cocoa Touch. Both are object-oriented APIs. One for a system that uses mouse pointer and the other for a touchscreen.

2) I don't know of a single frameworks in Cocoa Touch that was brought over to Cocoa. If you know of any please let us know.

3) I don't doubt that it's "all the time" considering this beta only dropped on Thursday, but I am experience this bug.

4) You having an issue with your cursor is not evidence that Apple will be removing the cursor to make all Macs touchscreens. It's a silly notion in so many ways.

5) Ah, so you're saying it's an issue with Lion. An issue that you think is proof that Apple is ignoring the drivers and UI for using a mouse yet has absolutely no touch-based Macs on the market. That makes even less sense than saying it's a "feature" of ML.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #82 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

That's the domain for emails, and it's not available to new users anymore so I think it's accurate to say that @mac.com was replaced by @me.com and that .Mac was replaced by MobileMe was replaced by iCloud. Really they are all just building (or rebuilding) off each other from iTools.

With the introduction of iCloud one now has to enter their entire email address, I like logging into me.com so much more. Well, except for the fact that it defaults to me.com and I consistently change it back to mac.com before clicking on Login (insert any kind of smiley here; I just don't use 'em)

Quote:
Originally Posted by andyapple View Post

OS

or just


My email address? It's xxx at Option-Shift-K.com (again, smiley here)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Garamond View Post

By the way, why doesn't Apple remove the space? We have iOS, so the equivalent would be OSX (without the space between S and X).

Because phonetically it can be read as 'OSeX'¿
"Fibonacci: As easy as 1, 1, 2, 3..."
Reply
"Fibonacci: As easy as 1, 1, 2, 3..."
Reply
post #83 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2oh1 View Post

Whoa. When did THAT happen? 10.7.3? I'd swear the old way was still there in Lion last year. It is somewhat clunky. I love Apple, but I'm amazed by how many awkward bits of UI they never get around to cleaning up.

Happened with 10.7.0

With the launch of OS X (10.0) the Printer settings where 'a bit hidden' in the utilities folder. I never understood why it wasn't in System Preferences, and that took many years for it to appear there. Yep, strange.
"Fibonacci: As easy as 1, 1, 2, 3..."
Reply
"Fibonacci: As easy as 1, 1, 2, 3..."
Reply
post #84 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) Cocoa was around long before Cocoa Touch. Both are object-oriented APIs. One for a system that uses mouse pointer and the other for a touchscreen.

2) I don't know of a single frameworks in Cocoa Touch that was brought over to Cocoa. If you know of any please let us know.

I know that the Cocoa foundation predates Touch. I just meant that Cocoa is the base set of Mac OSX and iOS development. Cocoa Touch is a superset of the framework and new APIs are showing up all the time by Apple. On the framework code level there is no difference between OSX and iOS. Apple has been pushing this for many years and IMO is how they will merge the two platforms.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

3) I don't doubt that it's "all the time" considering this beta only dropped on Thursday, but I am experience this bug.

4) You having an issue with your cursor is not evidence that Apple will be removing the cursor to make all Macs touchscreens. It's a silly notion in so many ways.

I never said that Apple will remove the cursor. That is silly. IMO Apple is merging the two into the framework and the UI elements have unintended actions. The accuracy problem I'm experiencing is a confounding variable (or a driver problem of my wireless Logitech mouse) that Apple (or Logitech) will need to address or maybe they already did in ML. I don't have it so I don't know.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

5) Ah, so you're saying it's an issue with Lion. An issue that you think is proof that Apple is ignoring the drivers and UI for using a mouse yet has absolutely no touch-based Macs on the market. That makes even less sense than saying it's a "feature" of ML.

I said it was an issue that appeared with me when I ungraded to 10.7.3. It's proof of nothing, except the two input methods (mouse & touch) are not working together properly. Apple has had touch based Macs using Mac OSX ever since they have had laptops. My sister never uses a mouse on her laptop. For her touch and keyboard input is her preferred method. My nephew use iOS more and loves the new extended touch features on his laptop.

I use an iMac with no trackpad. For me the mouse and keyboard are everything. Apple is not ignoring the drivers and will get this issue sorted out. You are mixing up what I was saying or I didn't say it properly. Either way Apple does have touch based Macs. They are laptops and desktops using trackpad input. iOS devices are just extensions to Mac OSX also using Cocoa and Apple is pushing Cocoa because they believe the future is that all their product line will be iDevices and mobile. OSX and iOS will merge into a superset Cocoa code based language. Of course this is all just my opinion and speculation, but there is plenty of evidence to support it.
post #85 of 94
The steps are clear:

1- They began to get rid of Aqua, starting with 10.4.

2- Beginning also with 10.4, the Apple software began to be the least integrated apps with the Apple Human Interface Guidelines (they used non-standard looks, non-standard buttons, non-standard windows, which began the paradox that Apple software was the one that looked "less Apple".

3- The sales success of iOS turns Apple blind: Instead of developing iOS to have the exceptional OSX workflow for touch devices, they allow broken UI workflow into iOS.

4- They believe the broken workflow in iOS is the way to go, so they introduce it in Lion (i.e.; Autosave and Versions)

5- Instead of developing new Apple HI guidelines, they decide to ignore them. Why care about the Apple Human Interface guidelines? Apple apps were no longer following them anyway (see 2 above).

6- The sales of iOS are impressive. They need to base all the company business model in iOS.

7- They (wrongly) assume that the success is to merge iOS and OSX in a way that OSX becomes iOS. They begin to do it with Lion, in a very dumb way, by putting apps and technologies that don't integrate well with the Mac (just see the hilarious iCal, or Launchpad, technologies that don't look as OS features, but as add-ons installed on top of the OS).

8- They notice the bad quality result of Lion, and they try to fix it in a new version which makes the same mistake: Instead of fixing iOS, they try to continue to trash OSX.

9- Evolving iOS in a way that it loses its broken paradigms would be too risky... who's gonna hold a critic viewpoint against the sales numbers? Only Steve Jobs could do that, but he's no longer with us.

10- If you've read all the points till now, try to imagine the marketing team behind Mountain Lion. Most of them excited with iOS success. Many of them don't use a Mac for they real work, and use more their iPhones and iPads than any other Apple technology.

11- Their conclusion can just be one: Why use the "Mac" word in our future brands? It hurts us.

12- The Mac is dead.
post #86 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecs View Post



12- The Mac is dead.


...but not today.

As the company that coined the "Post PC" phrase, I think Apple is savvy enough to realize that this thinking applies to their products as well. In ten years, what will it mean to use a computer?

Tablets are replacing laptops; laptops are replacing desktops; and the needs of the professional space overlap less and less with the mainstream. While this may well be the first step in a transition of sorts, it doesn't mean that Apple will stop making devices that are meant to be used by a "power audience."

The Mac is alive and well.
post #87 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecs View Post

post

1. Illuminous is better, anyway.

2. Blah blah blah.

3. Yeah, sure. "Broken workflow".

4. Again, ha.

5. *whistling*

6. Well yeah.

7. Thanks for pretending you know this is what they're doing.

8. Thanks for pretending Lion has a "bad quality result".

9. *more whistling*

10. Since you can't possibly know anything about what they're doing behind the scenes, I'll leave that to you.

11. Again, you can't possibly know this and that conclusion is hilariously wrong.

12. In 2017, sure.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #88 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keda View Post

The Mac is alive and well.

It is alive and well because you can use Snow Leopard on most Macs, and because Lion still didn't make many too aggressive changes. But they are in the path of getting rid of the Mac. They've realized the "Mac" name hurts in the marketing of Mountain Lion, because ML doesn't follow the Mac paradigm, but the iPhone paradigm.

If the Mac was as alive today as 5 years ago, ML would be Mac OS X 10.8, not OS X 10.8
post #89 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecs View Post

It is alive and well because you can use Snow Leopard on most Macs, and because Lion still didn't make many too aggressive changes. But they are in the path of getting rid of the Mac. They've realized the "Mac" name hurts in the marketing of Mountain Lion, because ML doesn't follow the Mac paradigm, but the iPhone paradigm.

If the Mac was as alive today as 5 years ago, ML would be Mac OS X 10.8, not OS X 10.8

You know, if every person who claimed on an internet forum that they were moving to Linux had actually done so Linux would have a solid 50% market share by now.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
post #90 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecs View Post

It is alive and well because you can use Snow Leopard on most Macs, and because Lion still didn't make many too aggressive changes. But they are in the path of getting rid of the Mac. They've realized the "Mac" name hurts in the marketing of Mountain Lion, because ML doesn't follow the Mac paradigm, but the iPhone paradigm.

If the Mac was as alive today as 5 years ago, ML would be Mac OS X 10.8, not OS X 10.8

Based on your logic they are on a path to get rid of the iPhone, too, because they dropped iPhone from the name of the OS.

A rational person would realize that the Mac business is important to Apple's bottom line. You'd realzie that iDevices can help sell Mac and that Macs can help keep users in the Apple ecosystem. You'd realize that this announcement of a new version of OS X so soon after Lion's release, a promise of yearly releases, and a focus on making the Mac easier and better use is exactly the opposite of what you say is happening. A rational person would also realize that the Mac platform is more active than it's ever been in the history of Apple and that more Macs can run Lion than Macs can run Snow Leopard.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #91 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

You know, if every person who claimed on an internet forum that they were moving to Linux had actually done so Linux would have a solid 50% market share by now.

Not my case. I was a UNIX workstation user. Then I used an iMac G5 for a couple of years, but had to move to Linux because of job requirements. Last year I was able to go back to the Mac both in work and at home. I still use Linux, not as my machine (which is the Mac now), but I still use it. And I obviously won't have any difficulty in going back to Linux if OSX is going to get the iOS functionality paradigm. I don't want to be forced to follow iOS paradigms in my main work machine, sorry.
post #92 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Based on your logic they are on a path to get rid of the iPhone, too, because they dropped iPhone from the name of the OS.

A rational person would realize that the Mac business is important to Apple's bottom line. You'd realzie that iDevices can help sell Mac and that Macs can help keep users in the Apple ecosystem. You'd realize that this announcement of a new version of OS X so soon after Lion's release, a promise of yearly releases, and a focus on making the Mac easier and better use is exactly the opposite of what you say is happening. A rational person would also realize that the Mac platform is more active than it's ever been in the history of Apple and that more Macs can run Lion than Macs can run Snow Leopard.

Then, why does the "Mac" name hurt for marketing?
post #93 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecs View Post

Then, why does the "Mac" name hurt for marketing?

You are characterizing the name change this way, but I don't think "Mac" was dropped because it hurts marketing--quite the opposite. It looks like Apple is trying to increase the differentiation between the hardware and OS. As I wrote in my previous post, this could give them flexibility to move beyond the Mac brand at some point, and release non-Mac devices that ran OSX (or something completely different).

I run Lion on most of my Macs, and love it. After getting used to the new changes in Lion (yes, iOS-inspired ones), I find that I miss them when working in SL. Who knows what the future holds, but all this excitement about the near-term implications of the name change seems like an over reaction.
post #94 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecs View Post

Then, why does the "Mac" name hurt for marketing?

To add to Keda's point. They aren't dropping Mac from HW just like they didn't stop calling (or caring about the iPhone hardware when they dropped Phone from the OS name.

If you have an argument that shows that Apple had given up on iPhone when they changed iPhone OS to iOS then please share.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Mac OS X
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › With Mountain Lion, Apple officially drops 'Mac' from OS X name