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Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion: Safari 5.2 gets a simplified user interface with new sharing...

post #1 of 89
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Safari gets a minor overhaul in this summer's release of OS X Mountain Lion, offering a cleaner, smarter user interface with a unified search and location field and new sharing features.

Safari has a history of delivering innovative new features while retaining one of the simplest user interfaces among major browsers available. In Mountain Lion, Safari removes the Google search field (and its SnapBack button) to leave one single location field.

From that single field, you can now just type the beginning of a website location, a search engine query, or reference a saved bookmark or recently visited page in your history. Safari continues to suggest alternatives as you type, but now it populates the results with potential searches recommended by Google (which remains the default search engine; Yahoo and Microsoft remain alternative options for search).




No Phishing

Also new in Mountain Lion's Safari is textual highlighting of the host in the displayed URL (as shown below, circled in red). This helps users, particularly the less technically inclined, see what server is hosting their page among all the other code in the URL pathname.

The feature should help users notice when a phony site is being used to display what appears to be a reputable site, such as when a known fraud site like "Hardcashhijackinfo.net" hosts a malicious, phishing version of PayPal.com, advertised via email spam warning users they must log into their account following a hyperlink.




Easy Reader, Sharing

Another new simplification of the Safari window is the newly omnipresent Reader button. Click it and it enters Reader for you on the selected page. When there's nothing to read, the button is simply greyed out.




Other button options remain the same (note that the Options button shown belongs to the optional Ad Block Safari Extension, and is not new to Mountain Lion), although the default set of buttons has changed to add a Share Sheets button.




The new Sharing button presents alternative ways (from its menu, below top) to add a page to the Reading List, Top Sites or other Bookmark folders, or email the content of the web page, all of which were previously available as menu bar options or keyboard commands, but now more conveniently accessible via the Sharing button.









Sharing also introduces new options to Message or Tweet the url. The Twitter sharing feature uses the same tweet user interface as iOS.




On of 2: Safari turns 9, Resurrecting the web

Safari turns 9

It's hard to believe that Safari just turned nine years old. Prior to launching its own browser, Apple bundled Netscape Navigator and Microsoft's Internet Explorer for Mac (apart from a brief experiment in 1996 with its own OpenDoc-based browser components named Cyberdog).

With both Netscape and Microsoft treating the Macintosh platform as a secondhand project, Steve Jobs initiated the Safari project so Mac users could have a first rate, competitive web browser. Apple hired Netscape's Dave Hyatt in mid 2002, who had worked on the Mozilla browser since 1997, creating the Chimera/Camino browser as well as co-founding the Phoenix/Firefox browser with Blake Ross.

Rather than using Mozilla's open browser code (which he was intimately familiar with, and which was derived from Netscape), Hyatt and the Safari team leveraged the largely unknown open source KHML web rendering engine to rapidly deliver the first version of Safari within months.

Resurrecting the web

As Safari's developer, Apple rapidly became an important contributor to the HTML standards process, with Safari leading the effort to work toward standards compliance, highlighted by being the first to past tests such as Acid2. Apple is also a primary contributor to the HTML5 specification.




Apple was required by KHTML's licensing terms to share its improvements to the web and JavaScript rendering engine, which it did under the LGPL WebCore and JavaScriptCore projects. But Apple also went further and also made its own complete layout engine available as open source too, under the name WebKit.

WebKit allowed other vendors to quickly develop entire browsers for their own devices and platforms, sharing the same type of standards compliance that Safari had helped to initiate on the Mac. Apple launched its own WebKit Safari browsers for OS X and Windows, followed by a mobile version for iOS.

Other vendors, ranging from Nokia to Google to RIM to Samsung, have also used WebKit to deliver Safari-like browsers. Apart from Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 browser, virtually every mobile device and smartphone now uses a WebKit browser, giving WebKit nearly 100% market share among mobile devices.

Thanks to Google's proliferation of its WebKit based Chrome browser on Windows and Macs, WebKit now also about 24 percent of desktop users' browsers, compared to Microsoft's 53 percent share with Internet Explorer and Mozilla's 21 percent share with Firefox.




Apple's next version of Safari in Mountain Lion also incorporates some unique new features that are lacking in other WebKit browsers such as Chrome, including new privacy and website alert features. The next segment Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion will describe how these work.

[ View article on AppleInsider ]
post #2 of 89
I hadn't realized the greyed out text in the URL was to prevent phishing. Good to know!

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post #3 of 89
In before the anti-Apple brigade starts screaming about the unified bar and the greying out of extended URLs.
post #4 of 89
I downloaded Safari 5.2 through the developer portal for OS X Lion.

It sucked, big time.

I personally prefer having the URL and search bar separate, and the 'Reader' button in 5.2 is just... Ugly. And what the hell did they do to the tabs?

I switched back to 5.1.
post #5 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

In before the anti-Apple brigade starts screaming about the unified bar and the greying out of extended URLs.

What's that?
You think your posting takes the steam out of the obvious?
Here is Apple playing 'ketchup' yet again....
post #6 of 89
In after the anti-Apple brigade has screamed about the unified bar and the greying out of extended URLs.
post #7 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by CGJ View Post

I downloaded Safari 5.2 through the developer portal for OS X Lion.

It sucked, big time.

I personally prefer having the URL and search bar separate, and the 'Reader' button in 5.2 is just... Ugly. And what the hell did they do to the tabs?

Reader does come in handy from time to time, so a button for that would be welcomed. As a button it is easy to clean up.

The URL search bar integration is beyond stupid though, I really hope it gets dropped in the final release. The actions are distinctly different, especially when trying to search a document already loaded into the browser. From the human factors standpoint it just looks like a disaster.

Worst I can see Safari struggling with trying to determine what I'm doing with my typing in that box.
Quote:
I switched back to 5.1.

There is the rub you can do that now but maybe not for mountain lion.
post #8 of 89
All that stuff looks antiquated. C'mon Apple spruce up that UI.Especially the tool bar section.
post #9 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

In after the anti-Apple brigade has screamed about the unified bar and the greying out of extended URLs.

The search bar / URL bar integration is not justified in my mind so it is worth talking about. The other issues are personal preference but in this case I see real usability and technical issues to deal with. Safari has been on a two step forward one back for years now. Lots of great improvements mixed in with a boondoggle or two every release.
post #10 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

In after the anti-Apple brigade has screamed about the unified bar and the greying out of extended URLs.

@Tallest Skil's comments

Beautiful work by Apple.
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Pot is legal in North Korea.
That explains a considerable amount.

"The United States will respond proportionally at a place and time we choose..."
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post #11 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

The actions are distinctly different, especially when trying to search a document already loaded into the browser.

You've never used the URL bar for that anyway.

My problems with 5.2 are as follows:

I want my bookmarks to show up before search suggestions in the popup.

I want tabs to go back to the way they were. Apple, you've screwed with my tabs before (putting them on TOP, for heaven's sake), don't do it again.

I keep hitting tab when I create a new tab because I'm conditioned to expect to have to switch to the search box to do a search. But that's my fault. I welcome wholeheartedly the combination bar, it just needs to be done right.
post #12 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post



Beautiful work by Apple.

Now, now. Don't be mean: "Safari has a history of delivering innovative new features"

-posted using Chrome for Android.
post #13 of 89
Still no tabs-in-titlebar option? Chrome, Firefox and IE all now have that option as default. I reckon they're onto something...
post #14 of 89
I have a MacPro 2,1 and had to hack 10.8 dev pre to work on it. I say it looks pretty nice. I like the new Safari. 10.8 Dev Pre works pretty good on my non supported MacBook Pro and MacPro. Few glitches but all in all boots good. I really don't understand why Apple would eliminate the pre 2008 macs other than the 64bit rom but my MacPro runs 10.8 really good. I would understand Apple trying to refresh the users to upgrade to newer macs though.
An Apple man since 1977
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An Apple man since 1977
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post #15 of 89
Quote:
Safari has a history of delivering innovative new features while retaining one of the simplest user interfaces among major browsers available.

The Apple asskissing continues.
post #16 of 89
Not sure why people hate the unified search/address bar. I've been hoping that the feature would come to Safari for a little while now. Maybe someone can explain why there would be any degree of conflict? I imagine it would be easier to use for typical computer users as well.
The true measure of a man is how he treats someone that can do him absolutely no good.
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The true measure of a man is how he treats someone that can do him absolutely no good.
  Samuel Johnson
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post #17 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacloo View Post

The Apple asskissing continues.

On a website dedicated to Apple news? WHAT ARE THE ODDS?!
post #18 of 89
Google Chrome is the most influential desktop software app of the last 5 years.

It's positively insulting Chrome's influence wasn't mentioned all over this article. Nest up for Safari is a Top Sites design I won't be embarrassed to use. And an intelligent way of closing 10 tabs in a row. Easily Chrome's best feature IMO. I just love not having to move the mouse when closing a few tabs, it's genius - especially when you do move the mouse the tabs grow to their regular size.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #19 of 89
About time for unify bar!

Few things I hope Apple will update (probably never)

1) colorful view-source
2) tabs above unify bar rather than underneath (like Chrome)
3) please update daily (like Chrome and Firefox) to keep webkit up to date... https://twitter.com/llahnoraa/status/165676328941658112 and
4) less beach ball time
post #20 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by supremedesigner View Post

1) colorful view-source

I think I'll like the answer, but what do you mean by this?

Quote:
2) tabs above unify bar rather than underneath (like Chrome)

NO. Dear heavens, you hate usability, don't you?

Quote:
3) please update daily (like Chrome and Firefox) to keep webkit up to date...

Oh, yeah, daily updates; that's real good.

Safari uses WebKit2 already, Chrome is WebKit. Call me when Google's up to date.

Quote:
4) less beach ball time

Where are you still getting them? I haven't had Safari crash ONCE since Lion DP 2.2, which is a welcome change from before the Lion DPs, too.
post #21 of 89
This article screams Daniel Eran.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #22 of 89
Correction: Mozilla was not based on Netscape but was a rewrite from scratch. The origInal netscape's rendering engine was also called Mozilla, but had no code in common with the gecko-based Mozilla browser that became Firebird and then Firefox.
post #23 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by CGJ View Post

I downloaded Safari 5.2 through the developer portal for OS X Lion.

It sucked, big time.

I personally prefer having the URL and search bar separate, and the 'Reader' button in 5.2 is just... Ugly. And what the hell did they do to the tabs?

I switched back to 5.1.

http://photos.appleinsider.com/MLSafari3.png

The tabs are there. Look below the address bar all the way to the right you will see a plus symbol. Click on that and you will get a new tab.
An Apple man since 1977
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An Apple man since 1977
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post #24 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

Now, now. Don't be mean: "Safari has a history of delivering innovative new features"

-posted using Chrome for Android.

You misread my post.

I was laughing at Tallest Skil's comments.
Pot is legal in North Korea.
That explains a considerable amount.

"The United States will respond proportionally at a place and time we choose..."
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Pot is legal in North Korea.
That explains a considerable amount.

"The United States will respond proportionally at a place and time we choose..."
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post #25 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

On a website dedicated to Apple news? WHAT ARE THE ODDS?!

That's right, news. Which is a pain to read on AI because facts are mixed with the writers personal opinion, but it's still written in such a away it's the one and only truth.

Why doesn't the author just be honest with it and separate fact and opinion and write a personal opinion, eg:

// objective facts go here
I've always thoughtSafari has a history of delivering innovative new features while retaining one of the simplest user interfaces among major browsers available.
// objective facts go here
// etc

... Just choose to write in a blog/opinion esque style or write news, the current articles read as propoganda.
post #26 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I think I'll like the answer, but what do you mean by this?



NO. Dear heavens, you hate usability, don't you?



Oh, yeah, daily updates; that's real good.

Safari uses WebKit2 already, Chrome is WebKit. Call me when Google's up to date.



Where are you still getting them? I haven't had Safari crash ONCE since Lion DP 2.2, which is a welcome change from before the Lion DPs, too.

Wrong. Webkit2 is implementing what chrome already had. Go read about it.
post #27 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

Wrong. Webkit2 is implementing what chrome already had. Go read about it.

I couldn't care less about Chrome's proprietary add-ons to WebKit.

WebKit2 takes whatever their stuff is, makes it standard, and opens it to more than just its original use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dacloo View Post

// objective facts go here
I've always thoughtSafari has a history of delivering innovative new features while retaining one of the simplest user interfaces among major browsers available.
// objective facts go here

Or you could post a rebuttal where you prove it wrong if it's not fact.
post #28 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I think I'll like the answer, but what do you mean by this?

You know what he means, it's colored syntax highlighting.
The oracle 'will like' the answer? Just say it's a good suggestion, man.
Is it so hard?
post #29 of 89
I would like an improved bookmarks system like Firefox has: a column on the left with bookmarks I can add and drag around visually.
post #30 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

In after the anti-Apple brigade has screamed about the unified bar and the greying out of extended URLs.

It's not anti-Apple to dislike the new interface (or any other Apple design decision). Are you one of those who said people opposed to the Iraq War were anti-American?

Personally, I don't like the unified address bar idea, as I don't see a way to implement it that wouldn't take me where I don't want to go. I just hope there's a hidden preference to get back to a separate search bar.
post #31 of 89
I thought the Javascript engine in Safari 5.2 is suppose to get a substantial upgrade. Is that not true?

For me, that is a key win. Safari needs to be positioned as the mst private, fastest browser around. Better than Chrome in these areas

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post #32 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Google Chrome is the most influential desktop software app of the last 5 years.

Chrome is a popular 3rd-party browser but WebKit is by far more influential in computing over the last 5 years. Even Mobile Safari is more influential than Chrome in the past 5 years. Before that there were no decent smartphone browsers. Even today no mobile OS browser works as well. However, now with Chrome on Android Chrome might overtake Safari in installations.


Quote:
Originally Posted by supremedesigner View Post

2) tabs above unify bar rather than underneath (like Chrome)

They tried it, I liked it, they didn't, don't expect it.

Note that Safari's tab bar, bookmarks bar, and address bar rows use slightly less room than Chrome despite Chrome's tabs being at the top.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Oh, yeah, daily updates; that's real good.

Safari uses WebKit2 already, Chrome is WebKit. Call me when Google's up to date.

In this age of constant connectivity the layout engine API version isn't as important as being secure. This makes frequent and automatic updates to the browser a good thing and makes whether Chrome uses WebKit 1 or 2 a moot point.

Next week is the Pwn2Own. While this in itself is lame Google has put themselves on the line by offering large cash prizes for those that can hack their browser. One could say this is hubris but it's also commendable that they would put themselves on the line.

PS: I expect MS and Apple to update their browsers right before the contest.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Morky View Post

Correction: Mozilla was not based on Netscape but was a rewrite from scratch. The origInal netscape's rendering engine was also called Mozilla, but had no code in common with the gecko-based Mozilla browser that became Firebird and then Firefox.

Gecko was used in Netscape Navigator 5.

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post #33 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacloo View Post

You know what he means, it's colored syntax highlighting.

No, I didn't. And now I'm confused because we already have that.

Quote:
Is it so hard?

Apparently it's harder than not mocking other users.

Quote:
Originally Posted by elroth View Post

It's not anti-Apple to dislike the new interface (or any other Apple design decision).

I never said that. Perhaps it could be implied, but it wasn't my intention. Chrome was my intention.
post #34 of 89
Meh. I just can't like Safari no matter how hard I try, and at a weak 5% market share I'm guessing I'm not the only one who prefers another browser.

OS X 10.7 "Vista" also leaves me with a disappointed feeling. A feeling I don't get when I use Snow Leopard.
post #35 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by dualie View Post

OS X 10.7 "Vista" also leaves me with a disappointed feeling.

post #36 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


No frownsmile for him.
Pot is legal in North Korea.
That explains a considerable amount.

"The United States will respond proportionally at a place and time we choose..."
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Pot is legal in North Korea.
That explains a considerable amount.

"The United States will respond proportionally at a place and time we choose..."
Reply
post #37 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I couldn't care less about Chrome's proprietary add-ons to WebKit.

WebKit2 takes whatever their stuff is, makes it standard, and opens it to more than just its original use.



Or you could post a rebuttal where you prove it wrong if it's not fact.

then why are you mouthing off about google not being 'up to date'? webkit2 is adding features that the chromium kit had before it and that chrome already has.
*phone ringing* it's for you: APPLE SAFARI IS PLAYING 'KETCHUP' TO GOOGLE CHROME
post #38 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

then why are you mouthing off about google not being 'up to date'? webkit2 is adding features that the chromium kit had before it and that chrome already has.

Does someone else who followed 90s web development more closely than I did want to explain to this guy why what he's saying isn't much of an argument for him?

Or can we just leave it at my "in before"/"in after" statements?
post #39 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post

Not sure why people hate the unified search/address bar. I've been hoping that the feature would come to Safari for a little while now. Maybe someone can explain why there would be any degree of conflict? I imagine it would be easier to use for typical computer users as well.

Doesn't this add more steps? If I want to go to domain.com I press Command-L, type "domain.com" and press Enter. On the other hand if I want to do a search for "cool stuff" I press Command-Option-F, type "cool stuff" and press Enter. With the single search bar I'll have to press Command-L (or whatever), enter my domain name or search query, then mess around with the arrow keys or the mouse to select the kind of input I want. Please correct me if you've actually used this and it works better than I'm imagining.

I will concede that when I taught computer classes, I saw that at least 95% of people used the address field and search field interchangeably, as if they didn't understand the difference between the two. So I think this is inevitable (and hardly innovative since IE 9 and Chrome already do it).

I also think it's inevitable that eventually URLs will be hidden completely, and that will be a sad day for tech-savvy users who can learn things from looking at the domain name, tweak the URL to navigate to a different page, work around a broken page, etc. But it's all gobbledygook for most users.
post #40 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

The URL search bar integration is beyond stupid though, I really hope it gets dropped in the final release.

What are you guys talking about?

The integrated search/url is one of the reasons that make Chrome great, something most reviewers have pointed out.

For me it's a pain point that keeps me from using Safari.

Have you tried it for a while, or it's just a case of "anything different is stupid" thing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

The actions are distinctly different

The actions are exactly the same: I write something and the browser shows me something based on what I wrote. P

lus each action is almost equally common (i.e searching vs entering a URL). So, why should I write in a different box, and use a shortcut/move my mouse to select it depending to if I type in a URL or a query, when the browser is perfectly capable of determining what I want to do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

especially when trying to search a document already loaded into the browser.

That's not done in the URL bar in Mountain Lion, but on a search bar below. So this complaint is also invalid
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