or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Switching to iPads saves Vancouver City Council 50K pages a year
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Switching to iPads saves Vancouver City Council 50K pages a year

post #1 of 67
Thread Starter 
The city of Vancouver, Wash., has seen substantial savings since switching to Apple's iPad for City Council meetings and expects to save as many as 50,000 pages of printing per year.

Vancouver began its paperless City Council test . After two months, the transition to iPads has brought about a 40 percent reduction in the amount of pages printed for meetings.

The city has tested Apple's touchscreen tablet as a replacement for meeting packets at council meetings, orientation sessions, a retreat and the applicant review process for advisory board/commission vacancies. The City Council will complete its transition to paperless later this spring, though it will continue to offer printouts to citizens attending its meetings.

The switch to iPad was championed by City Council member Jack Burkman, a former high tech executive. He worked with the city's management team to try out several methods for loading pertinent documents onto his iPad ahead of meetings. The city ultimately decided to use an internal FTP website to store PDF files for council members to download.

The iPad has also helped Vancouver's leadership team increase their productivity at meetings. "Many leaders had blackberry smart phones for email access, but with small video screens, they were difficult to reply in email. The iPads allowed staff to review internet sites as part of the meeting or share multi-page documents paperlessly for their discussion," the city's statement read.




Switching from Research in Motion's BlackBerry to the iPad results in a costs savings for the city as well. The city estimates it pays $71 per month for BlackBerry access and just $43 per month for unlimited iPad data. As such, Vancouver estimates savings of up to $336 per year for each iPad that replaces a BlackBerry.

Cost savings from printing will quickly add up for the city. It estimates that printing out packets for just one agenda item can cost as much as $21.10. With between eight to ten agenda items on the typical meeting, Vancouver could see printing savings of as much as $200 per meeting.

City departments have spent roughly $17,000 on iPads, with an average cost of $601.50 each. 25 additional iPads were purchased for the Vancouver Police Dept. Command staff using a grant. The city has "no definite plans" to expand its program yet, though it says it may continue to strategically replace BlackBerry devices.

A growing trend among government agencies in the U.S. has seen departments moving away from RIM and toward Apple's iOS. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will soon abandon support for the BlackBerry and will instead supply workers with new iPhones and iPads. The U.S. General Services Administration has added iOS to its approved purchasing list.

RIM said last month that it "continues to work closely" with government clients, touting its PlayBook tablet as the "only tablet certified for use by U.S. government agencies."

A recent survey by Morgan Stanley projected an accelerated transition away from printing within the enterprise. Analyst Katy Huberty picked up on a worse-than-expected 16 percent decline in printing, due, in part, to the rise of the iPad among corporate customers. 46 percent of tablet users said they printed less, with some survey respondents indicating that they printed as much as 16 percent less now that they own a tablet.




Apple could see increased adoption of its touchscreen tablet as a printing replacement with the release of its next-generation iPad later this month. The third-generation iPad is expected to have an double-resolution display that will make reading on the device easier. The new iPad could see rapid adoption among industries such as aviation and medicine where the increased resolution would drastically improve utility.

[ View article on AppleInsider ]
post #2 of 67
50k pages is about 100 reams of paper at $2.50 per ream... or about $250 per year. Printing costs about double that, so congratulations Vancouver! You've saved $500 per year by spending many thousands of dollars on Apple products!

Where else but government can we hear how they save $1 by spending $100?
post #3 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by stmfreak View Post

50k pages is about 100 reams of paper at $2.50 per ream... or about $250 per year. Printing costs about double that, so congratulations Vancouver! You've saved $500 per year by spending many thousands of dollars on Apple products!

Where else but government can we hear how they save $1 by spending $100?

Amen. As much as I love the iPad, it's just pure idiotic ideology driving ridiculous spending like this. This also doesn't account for the inevitability of tech support and failure and IT costs...
post #4 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by stmfreak View Post

50k pages is about 100 reams of paper at $2.50 per ream... or about $250 per year. Printing costs about double that, so congratulations Vancouver! You've saved $500 per year by spending many thousands of dollars on Apple products!

Where else but government can we hear how they save $1 by spending $100?

You didn't read the article did you? I thought not.

The City of Vancouver saves more then just the cost of paper. You don't suppose all that text gets on the paper for free, do you? Counting the saving of switching from RIM BlackBerries iPads, at $336 per year per device.

Plus the costs of operating copy machines, leasing them, and buying toner, et cetera, the average city pays around 5 cents a copy. Take THAT times 50K copies and you get an additional $2,500 per year.

Reading the rest of the story, you learn that this savings was made by only using the iPads for City Council meetings. It can be expanded beyond this to further uses and savings.

Reading comprehension... it's a good skill to use.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #5 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by jg711 View Post

Amen. As much as I love the iPad, it's just pure idiotic ideology driving ridiculous spending like this. This also doesn't account for the inevitability of tech support and failure and IT costs...

To some extent this report does take that into account. They compared the saving of switching from RIM BlackBerries iPads, at $336 per year per device.

Read the story before commenting and you'll avoid making yourself out to be a fool.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #6 of 67
These sort of articles always make me laugh. As if doing this 10 years ago wasn't possible and now with the help of this "revolutionary product" we can go paperless! I mean they could have done this 10 years ago by providing them with laptops, or even desktops since all they do in city council is sit on a desk and shout at each other.

This is just a poor excuse for city council members to get a shiny new iPad for free at the expense of tax payers. I'm sure they could have opted for a $99 HP Touchpad and it would do the same job.
post #7 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ewan View Post

These sort of articles always make me laugh. As if doing this 10 years ago wasn't possible and now with the help of this "revolutionary product" we can go paperless! I mean they could have done this 10 years ago by providing them with laptops, or even desktops since all they do in city council is sit on a desk and shout at each other.

This is just a poor excuse for city council members to get a shiny new iPad for free at the expense of tax payers. I'm sure they could have opted for a $99 HP Touchpad and it would do the same job.

hmmm - yeah 10 years ago and $2000 per laptop back then.

or $99 per HP Touchpad plus $30,000 a year in additional IT cost to maintain and administer the HP solution - plug how much to rip and replace all that in two years?

what is revolutionary about the iPad is not that it solves any problem that was technically impossible to do otherwise - but it does so in a cost effective and streamlined fashion that does not require a massive increase in support cost or bring exposure and risk that other platforms carry.
post #8 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ewan View Post

These sort of articles always make me laugh. As if doing this 10 years ago wasn't possible and now with the help of this "revolutionary product" we can go paperless! I mean they could have done this 10 years ago by providing them with laptops, or even desktops since all they do in city council is sit on a desk and shout at each other.

This is just a poor excuse for city council members to get a shiny new iPad for free at the expense of tax payers. I'm sure they could have opted for a $99 HP Touchpad and it would do the same job.

Sure, you can "read stuff" on PCs but that doesn't make it a good substitution for all printed material.

Take eBooks, for example. These could have existed — and technically did — decades ago but it was only with the advent of a tablet-style reader it became a feasible replacement for books.

As for HP Touchpads where can they buy them for $99? Is there enough support and a large enough ecosystem to make the investment over other tablets more economical the TCoW?



PS: Off Topic: Get ready to buy some free apps as the counter is only 45 million from 25 billion.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #9 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

You didn't read the article did you? I thought not.

The City of Vancouver saves more then just the cost of paper. You don't suppose all that text gets on the paper for free, do you? Counting the saving of switching from RIM BlackBerries iPads, at $336 per year per device.

Plus the costs of operating copy machines, leasing them, and buying toner, et cetera, the average city pays around 5 cents a copy. Take THAT times 50K copies and you get an additional $2,500 per year.

Reading the rest of the story, you learn that this savings was made by only using the iPads for City Council meetings. It can be expanded beyond this to further uses and savings.

Reading comprehension... it's a good skill to use.

Well said.
post #10 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by stmfreak View Post

50k pages is about 100 reams of paper at $2.50 per ream... or about $250 per year. Printing costs about double that, so congratulations Vancouver! You've saved $500 per year by spending many thousands of dollars on Apple products!

Where else but government can we hear how they save $1 by spending $100?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jg711 View Post

Amen. As much as I love the iPad, it's just pure idiotic ideology driving ridiculous spending like this. This also doesn't account for the inevitability of tech support and failure and IT costs...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ewan View Post

These sort of articles always make me laugh. As if doing this 10 years ago wasn't possible and now with the help of this "revolutionary product" we can go paperless! I mean they could have done this 10 years ago by providing them with laptops, or even desktops since all they do in city council is sit on a desk and shout at each other.

This is just a poor excuse for city council members to get a shiny new iPad for free at the expense of tax payers. I'm sure they could have opted for a $99 HP Touchpad and it would do the same job.

These three registered to spew rubbish. Please, I hope this isn't a new trend!
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
post #11 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

These three registered to spew rubbish. Please, I hope this isn't a new trend!

About 15 minutes apart. I wonder if the IP addresses are the same.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #12 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

About 15 minutes apart. I wonder if the IP addresses are the same.

Thought crossed my mind!

Scribes and papyrus are a quaint notion today. Printing on the product of wasted forests will be as quaint a notion to our not-so-distant descendants.

I'm looking forward to an iPad with twice the area of the current one but lighter and longer lived on a charge lol! Apple has demonstrated that this is perhaps, not-such-wishful thinking. \
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
post #13 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

Scribes and papyrus are a quaint notion today. Printing on the product of wasted forests will be as quaint a notion to our not-so-distant descendants.

There will still be a use for paper at least until I die at while point someone will chisel my name in stone just as they did long before we had paper. (see what I did there? )

Quote:
I'm looking forward to an iPad with twice the area of the current one but lighter and longer lived on a charge lol! Apple has demonstrated that this is perhaps, not-such-wishful thinking.

Twice the area or twice the resolution? Twice the areas is a 13.7" tablet. At some point this might be feasible but I think it's years away from any practical sense.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #14 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by stmfreak View Post

50k pages is about 100 reams of paper at $2.50 per ream... or about $250 per year. Printing costs about double that, so congratulations Vancouver! You've saved $500 per year by spending many thousands of dollars on Apple products!

Where else but government can we hear how they save $1 by spending $100?

A bit picky with your facts, stmfreak?

You conveniently omitted the fact that they also save $336 pa per iPad of carrier charges

"The city estimates it pays $71 per month for BlackBerry access and just $43 per month for unlimited iPad data. As such, Vancouver estimates savings of up to $336 per year for each iPad that replaces a BlackBerry."
post #15 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Switching from Research in Motion's BlackBerry to the iPad results in a costs savings for the city as well. The city estimates it pays $71 per month for BlackBerry access and just $43 per month for unlimited iPad data. As such, Vancouver estimates savings of up to $336 per year for each iPad that replaces a BlackBerry.

I did not know you could also make phonecalls using an ipad as with the blackberry....

or is this comparison not telling the whole story...
post #16 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

These three registered to spew rubbish. Please, I hope this isn't a new trend!

Well spotted IQatEdo,

Its probably Slappy !
post #17 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

There will still be a use for paper at least until I die at while point someone will chisel my name in stone just as they did long before we had paper. (see what I did there? )

If you're of such stature that someone considers chiseling your name in stone, then I will be very pleased to have shared even this moment in space/time!

I do see what you did there, by the way!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Twice the area or twice the resolution? Twice the areas is a 13.7" tablet. At some point this might be feasible but I think it's years away from any practical sense.

Twice the area, which for a retina display I guess, is 8 times the resolution of my current (and beloved) iPad.
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
post #18 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Secular Investor View Post

Well spotted IQatEdo,

Its probably Slappy !

Slappy is probably still trying to figure out why he can't post anymore. I doubt he would think to create 3 IDs at once to post on this topic. Plus, his style is more about how Apple is failing not how governments are wasteful.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #19 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

If you're of such stature that someone considers chiseling your name in stone, then I will be very pleased to have shared even this moment in space/time!

I do see what you did there, by the way!

Actually I've left specific instructions to donate my body to science and have no grave or marker though I also stated that since I'll be dead I obviously won't care and that the living should do what they need to in order that suits them the best. I think I'm pragmatic... but perhaps I'm just an ass.

Quote:
Twice the area, which for a retina display I guess, is 8 times the resolution of my current (and beloved) iPad.

Oddly the number don't scale that way. To get essentially the same 265 PPI a 13.7" 4:3 would be about 2900x2180.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #20 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

There will still be a use for paper at least until I die at while point someone will chisel my name in stone just as they did long before we had paper. (see what I did there? )

Actually, you haven't read any published work of mine by any chance?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Actually I've left specific instructions to donate my body to science and have no grave or marker though I also stated that since I'll be dead I obviously won't care and that the living should do what they need to in order that suits them the best. I think I'm pragmatic... but perhaps I'm just an ass.

Good move.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Oddly the number don't scale that way. To get essentially the same 265 PPI a 13.7" 4:3 would be about 2900x2180.

Okay!
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
post #21 of 67
one big advantage of using the iPad besides cost savings is that you can put all thousands of pages pages onto an iPad so you can refer back to everything.

if one council member for example raises an unexpected question like "I thought in the 2010 referendum on the parks issue we decided... " etc etc, everyone can actually refer back to the document.
Otherwise you'll be sending assistants to search through paper files , make copies etc.
The cost savings (on time, labour etc) on that is HUGE.

(reading case studies on groups using iPads is that now a lot of b.s is removed quickly as everyone can check the details for themselves from the actual files)

This is a big bonus which naysayers don't understand. Try shoving thousands of your office files (previous minutes, data, histories etc) if they were paper into your brief case.

that's why so many corporations is using iPads now. Think about it , for example engineers in a meeting can immediately refer to thousands of diagrams, drawings, spec sheets etc immediately.

and the advantage of iPads over even laptops is that they are more portable, you you walk around with them (again the engineer example as he/she goes around the site) etc.

iPad rules.
post #22 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

Thought crossed my mind!

Scribes and papyrus are a quaint notion today. Printing on the product of wasted forests will be as quaint a notion to our not-so-distant descendants.

I'm looking forward to an iPad with twice the area of the current one but lighter and longer lived on a charge lol! Apple has demonstrated that this is perhaps, not-such-wishful thinking. \

With the arrival of the flexible roll-up monitor screen, we shall be returning to the era of the scroll.

Cheers
post #23 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Actually I've left specific instructions to donate my body to science and have no grave or marker though I also stated that since I'll be dead I obviously won't care and that the living should do what they need to in order that suits them the best. I think I'm pragmatic... but perhaps I'm just an ass.


Oddly the number don't scale that way. To get essentially the same 265 PPI a 13.7" 4:3 would be about 2900x2180.

I was going to donate my body... turns out that no one wants an old asshole...


Actually, my ashes will be intermingled with those of my late wife...
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
post #24 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davewrite View Post

one big advantage of using the iPad besides cost savings is that you can put all thousands of pages pages onto an iPad so you can refer back to everything.

if one council member for example raises an unexpected question like "I thought in the 2010 referendum on the parks issue we decided... " etc etc, everyone can actually refer back to the document.
Otherwise you'll be sending assistants to search through paper files , make copies etc.
The cost savings (on time, labour etc) on that is HUGE.

(reading case studies on groups using iPads is that now a lot of b.s is removed quickly as everyone can check the details for themselves from the actual files)

This is a big bonus which naysayers don't understand. Try shoving thousands of your office files (previous minutes, data, histories etc) if they were paper into your brief case.

that's why so many corporations is using iPads now. Think about it , for example engineers in a meeting can immediately refer to thousands of diagrams, drawings, spec sheets etc immediately.

and the advantage of iPads over even laptops is that they are more portable, you you walk around with them (again the engineer example as he/she goes around the site) etc.

iPad rules.


Gotta love people that don't read the thread. They are saving $250 per year. How many ipads does that buy?
post #25 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by realitycheck69 View Post

Gotta love people that don't read the thread. They are saving $250 per year. How many ipads does that buy?

"As such, Vancouver estimates savings of up to $336 per year for each iPad that replaces a BlackBerry."

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #26 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by mausz View Post

I did not know you could also make phonecalls using an ipad as with the blackberry....

or is this comparison not telling the whole story...

I make phone calls all the time with my iPad. Plenty of apps for that. I use talkatone. What's great is that these phone calls use data. So now they're just paying for data with no expensive phone plans. And yes it works just as reliably. What's also great is that if you have a "google voice number" it becomes your iPads main phone number. So when I get call to that number it rings my phone, iPad and laptop.
post #27 of 67
With the iPad becoming a replacement for printing, and documents, and Cook's comment that the iPad and MBA will eventually be merging in functionality, I'd say Apple will have to be moving to make the iPad easier and more flexible to use for handling documents.

The current applications on the iPad are merely okay for the uses described in this article. iBooks does not allow PDF documents to be annotated, highlighted. GoodReaders does, but of course uses its own solution. The Kindle app supports PDF documents also, but I haven't used it. Navigation of PDF documents is primitive.

Also, these apps do not allow multiple documents to be open at a time in iBooks (or simulated), for example. This feature is necessary.

Assuming my read of Cook is correct, we should see the iPad becoming significantly more powerful and flexible as it moves to replace the MBA, perhaps including increasing iPad's size (and options for smaller to compete in price with competitors), merging of iOS and OSX (Apple has dropped the name from Mac OS X to just OS X), and MBPs becoming more like MBA on steroids (with hard drives through Thunderbolt optional).

How long will this take? Within 5 years? Anybody thinking less than that?
post #28 of 67
The calculation seem quite easy. If the cost is $200 per meeting, with city council meetings weekly, that is $10,000 per year in savings. Given the cost, the cost recovery for the switch to iPad is less than 2 years. Not bad.

Then, because Vancouver Washington has a population of about 165,000, I would expect many city committee meetings with documents needed and generated for these meetings, including minutes. In most cities, there will be several committee meetings every workday. Again estimating perhaps 2 per day, 5 days per week, 50 weeks, and each committee meeting cost savings at $50 per meeting, that cost savings would be 2 x 5 x 50 x 50 = $25,000.

So, perhaps we are talking about $35,000/year savings. I'm ignoring the Blackberry savings since the article does not indicate that number of Blackberrys being replaced; in any case, this cost savings will be de minimus.
post #29 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

You didn't read the article did you? I thought not.

The City of Vancouver saves more then just the cost of paper. You don't suppose all that text gets on the paper for free, do you? Counting the saving of switching from RIM BlackBerries iPads, at $336 per year per device.

Plus the costs of operating copy machines, leasing them, and buying toner, et cetera, the average city pays around 5 cents a copy. Take THAT times 50K copies and you get an additional $2,500 per year.

Reading the rest of the story, you learn that this savings was made by only using the iPads for City Council meetings. It can be expanded beyond this to further uses and savings.

Reading comprehension... it's a good skill to use.

So they're getting rid of the copy machines and firing the clerks who run them? Cause that's the only way this works in the city's favor.

A decent office copier makes 70-100 copies per minute. Even smaller ones make 40 or so. Let's use 50 copies per minute as a round number. 50,000 copies would take 1,000 minutes, or 17 hours. Make it 18 hours overall counting loading paper, etc. Hell, make it 20 hours. Round number. If the office is open 250 days a year (weekdays, holidays off) for 8 hours a day, an average of 1% of each work day (or 5 minutes per day) spent on copying. Copying time is simply absorbed into the day to day routine.

There's simply no way this is cost effective if it's only used for council meetings.

Of course, it has a lot of intangible benefits. Council members should have every necessary document at their fingertips, not just meeting handouts. They can quickly access a lot of information, keep usable notes, and make calendar appointments on the spot. All good things that could make iPads worthwhile, but saving 10 boxes of paper is not that big a deal. Sorry.
post #30 of 67
Anyone else find it interesting and ironic that it is a Canadian city replacing a Canadian product with an Apple/American product? I would bet they thought long and hard before making this switch.

And if it was just switching to a tablet, they could have gone with a RIMM tablet. The fact they went with an Apple tablet may mean that the ecosystem, as well as ease and cost of use, is important as well to the purchasing decisions made. Also, the data cost savings will be a recurring savings for the life of the tablet
post #31 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conrail View Post

So they're getting rid of the copy machines and firing the clerks who run them? Cause that's the only way this works in the city's favor.

There's simply no way this is cost effective if it's only used for council meetings.

Of course, it has a lot of intangible benefits. Council members should have every necessary document at their fingertips, not just meeting handouts. They can quickly access a lot of information, keep usable notes, and make calendar appointments on the spot. All good things that could make iPads worthwhile, but saving 10 boxes of paper is not that big a deal. Sorry.

One extra cost is the cost of disposal of 50K sheets of paper(always interesting that disposal costs are never usually factored into the equation). Depending on the sensitivity of the paperwork, it may need to be disposed of in a secure manner which also adds cost. And storage eventually becomes a big deal. If you don't have to support an extra area to store the documents in an area where they are accessible, that is an additional cost savings.
post #32 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

You didn't read the article did you? I thought not.

The City of Vancouver saves more then just the cost of paper. You don't suppose all that text gets on the paper for free, do you? Counting the saving of switching from RIM BlackBerries iPads, at $336 per year per device.

Plus the costs of operating copy machines, leasing them, and buying toner, et cetera, the average city pays around 5 cents a copy. Take THAT times 50K copies and you get an additional $2,500 per year.

Reading the rest of the story, you learn that this savings was made by only using the iPads for City Council meetings. It can be expanded beyond this to further uses and savings.

Reading comprehension... it's a good skill to use.

Good summary. There are also the USER benefits, as well as suggested below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

The calculation seem quite easy. If the cost is $200 per meeting, with city council meetings weekly, that is $10,000 per year in savings. Given the cost, the cost recovery for the switch to iPad is less than 2 years. Not bad.

Then, because Vancouver has a population of about 600,000, I would expect many city committee meetings with documents needed and generated for these meetings, including minutes. In most cities, there will be several committee meetings every workday. Again estimating perhaps 2 per day, 5 days per week, 50 weeks, and each committee meeting cost savings at $50 per meeting, that cost savings would be 2 x 5 x 50 x 50 = $25,000.

So, perhaps we are talking about $35,000/year savings. I'm ignoring the Blackberry savings since the article does not indicate that number of Blackberrys being replaced; in any case, this cost savings will be de minimus.

I think your numbers are too high. I doubt if they're saving that much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Conrail View Post

So they're getting rid of the copy machines and firing the clerks who run them? Cause that's the only way this works in the city's favor.

A decent office copier makes 70-100 copies per minute. Even smaller ones make 40 or so. Let's use 50 copies per minute as a round number. 50,000 copies would take 1,000 minutes, or 17 hours. Make it 18 hours overall counting loading paper, etc. Hell, make it 20 hours. Round number. If the office is open 250 days a year (weekdays, holidays off) for 8 hours a day, an average of 1% of each work day (or 5 minutes per day) spent on copying. Copying time is simply absorbed into the day to day routine.

There's simply no way this is cost effective if it's only used for council meetings.

Once again, you keep ignoring the real costs.

First, paper at at least $250.
If the copier is leased (as many people do), add $0.01 per page - for $500.
Add in toner. Probably another couple hundred.
Then, not only do you have an employee standing there making the copies, but carrying papers from one office to another, carrying them to the copier, distributing them, and so on.
And, of course, the cost and hassle of copy machine breakdowns.

Ultimately, I would rather have my city employees doing something important rather than wasting their time on a copy machine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Conrail View Post

Of course, it has a lot of intangible benefits. Council members should have every necessary document at their fingertips, not just meeting handouts. They can quickly access a lot of information, keep usable notes, and make calendar appointments on the spot. All good things that could make iPads worthwhile, but saving 10 boxes of paper is not that big a deal. Sorry.

The highlighted part is the important part. Vancouver elected city officials to figure out how to manage the city and those officials decided on the iPad. If you don't like it, vote them out. But before you do it, think about what they accomplished:

- Saved enough money to pay for the iPads.
- Freed up some employee time which can be used to serve the public
- Probably most importantly, sent a message that paper is waste and should be minimized. If they stick to that message and reinforce it, who knows how many thousands or millions of unnecessary documents would not be printed? Sometimes, symbolism matters - and they're trying to create a 'green' culture.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #33 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by nealg View Post

Anyone else find it interesting and ironic that it is a Canadian city replacing a Canadian product with an Apple/American product? I would bet they thought long and hard before making this switch.

Its Vancouver Washington.
post #34 of 67
iPad needs simple and secure encryption of the device and this encryption assured to Enterprise management. Encryption of files as well. Since the apps operate independently, this needs to be part of the SDK thereby assuring Enterprise that the data is protected when stored to complement VPN options when data is in motion.

Checkpoints Pointsec and Apple new FileVault are good models for iPhone and iPad. This would really launch to iPad and iPhone into all Government markets as well as,contractors supporting the Government

My bet is Windows 8 will deliver this capability on its tablets.
post #35 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancxg View Post

Its Vancouver Washington.

My bad. I guess I need to go back to school and brush up on my reading skills
post #36 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

With the iPad becoming a replacement for printing, and documents, and Cook's comment that the iPad and MBA will eventually be merging in functionality, I'd say Apple will have to be moving to make the iPad easier and more flexible to use for handling documents.

The current applications on the iPad are merely okay for the uses described in this article. iBooks does not allow PDF documents to be annotated, highlighted. GoodReaders does, but of course uses its own solution. The Kindle app supports PDF documents also, but I haven't used it. Navigation of PDF documents is primitive.

Also, these apps do not allow multiple documents to be open at a time in iBooks (or simulated), for example. This feature is necessary.

I was actually jealous of a co-worker's blackberry/play book. He can edit a word document, PDF it, and send it out from his BB. No need for downloading an app. The half-assed printing (including PDF) disappoints me with iOS.

Oh well... Stock up again today...
post #37 of 67
My only hope is that they use something other than itunes to handle their file system.
post #38 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I was going to donate my body... turns out that no one wants an old asshole...


Actually, my ashes will be intermingled with those of my late wife...

Old guys like us, Dick, are actually very "green" oriented. When they cremate us they don't even have to turn on the gas... we supply our own.
na na na na na...
Reply
na na na na na...
Reply
post #39 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by stmfreak View Post

50k pages is about 100 reams of paper at $2.50 per ream... or about $250 per year. Printing costs about double that, so congratulations Vancouver! You've saved $500 per year by spending many thousands of dollars on Apple products!

Where else but government can we hear how they save $1 by spending $100?

I thought they were claiming that they saved $50,000/year by switching to iPads. Then had to re-read the article again..

"Many leaders had blackberry smart phones for email access, but with small video screens, they were difficult to reply in email."

I don't quite get this. RIM Blackberry is a phone vs. iPad a table, so I'm guessing the city employees now need a phone AND a tablet? I'm also guessing they are not getting iPhones any time soon since iphone's display is too small?
post #40 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by stmfreak View Post

50k pages is about 100 reams of paper at $2.50 per ream... or about $250 per year. Printing costs about double that, so congratulations Vancouver! You've saved $500 per year by spending many thousands of dollars on Apple products!

Where else but government can we hear how they save $1 by spending $100?

Where else can we have jerks that sign up just to troll the boards with their "everything Apple sucks and users are lame" comments.

I suppose you are anti electronic textbooks because kids shouldn't be given dumb toys to use in school. if a slate and wax pencil was good enough for you then it is good enough for all the little brats yes.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPad
  • Switching to iPads saves Vancouver City Council 50K pages a year
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Switching to iPads saves Vancouver City Council 50K pages a year