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Android Platform manager steps down after failing to fix app sales - Page 2

post #41 of 49
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Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

the beleaguered software store

Nice!
post #42 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post


Not sure what was funny. But you're welcome I suppose.
post #43 of 49
I think that we're going to be seeing more of this in the future.

Battleheart developer drops Android as 'unsustainable'

Battleheart's creator Mika Mobile in an update explained that it was dropping Android support. Google's platform was losing money for the company, since it spent about 20 percent of its time supporting the platform but only ever made five percent or less of the company's revenue. Much of the effort was spent on issues specific to Android, where the diversity was only creating problems rather than helping.

http://www.electronista.com/articles...sing.platform/
post #44 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post


And then there is Java. I know different people have different preferences if it comes to programming languages, but anyone telling you Java is 'just as nice' or even nicer than for example Objective-C simply never used anything but Java for anything non-trivial. I've been developing software for over 10 years, with over 2 years of experience in many languages (Java, C, C++, Objective-C, Python, PHP), and I think I can honestly say I'm a polyglot programmer by now. I can only say that Java is a terrible language to develop in. It's too verbose, too restrictive in how you are supposed to do certain things, it makes simple things hard, the standard libraries are a big convoluted mess full of legacy stuff, it's slow to compile and start, and the whole language is very archaic and static, missing many of the modern features of other languages. It's a PITA to work with, and I would never voluntarily choose to use it over some other language (even C++), unless absolutely necessary.

I've always been saying that Java is crap too, based upon what I've been reading. I am not a developer or programmer though and it's good to see somebody who is experienced and is a programmer also confirm that.

I wish you lots of success on all platforms, besides on Android of course.
post #45 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

I've always been saying that Java is crap too, based upon what I've been reading. I am not a developer or programmer though and it's good to see somebody who is experienced and is a programmer also confirm that.

It really is that bad, I really can't think of a single thing Java does better than any other popular and modern language. Platform independence used to be a big advantage (it was actually the main reason Java was developed originally), but today there are better alternatives that are also platform independent and much nicer to work with for new projects. Legacy software is often the only reason to stick with Java today, which unfortunately is holding back Java's demise, especially businesses are still very hot on Java for everything. Which is also why I still have to write or maintain Java code at work on a regular basis .

Quote:
I wish you lots of success on all platforms, besides on Android of course.

Thanks! My current project is an OS X application to control my SqueezeBox, which I mainly started working on because I wanted a better way to create playlists and skip tracks while programming .
post #46 of 49
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Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Once you release something as open source (Apache 2 and GPLv2) you can't just take it private. It is not like a public company taken private by buying up all the shares.

Android is in the wild, cat out of the bag, can't put the toothpaste back in the tube, opened a can of worms, etc.

Well supposedly. Last year, Google created and distributed Android 3.0 only to its launch partners, and it wasn't open source until the fourth quarter. That's nearly a year of being closed. There wasn't even much outcry from the open source community about it.

You also seem to forget that the value of Android isn't the Android core - it's Google's apps and overall UI, neither of which are really open.
post #47 of 49
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Originally Posted by ljocampo View Post

For the most part, Apple is synonymous with quality but that's not why I remain loyal to their brand. The main reason, and most important to me, is trust. I trust Apple to do everything in their power to keep my privacy and personal data securely safe within their ecosystem.
...
I don't trust Google, Facebook, or the Android platform. Google and Facebook's main product is you; those who use their free services. Many Android developers are more of the same. I'd rather pay for those services and not be open to an invasion of my privacy or sold to the highest bidder.
...

Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I totally agree with you. BTW you can add LinkedIn to that list of what not to trust!

It pleases me greatly to see more and more people finally paying attention to these issues. Too many lemmings these days reel out the "tinfoil hat" comments, but the ramifications of the personal and profiling data that these companies have on hundreds of millions of people is mind boggling and unprecedented in the history of the world. It's scary and dangerous.

Google's management will change over the coming years and they are under no legal obligation to hold their users' data private, nor are they "hack-proof", as the Chinese break-in proved. And for those of you who fear the gov't, they can practically single-source complete profiles of anyone they like from Google. Read this to confirm that they do. Scroll down to the bottom to see the US #s.

While Google may try in some ways to be a "good guy", Facebook doesn't even hide their intent, which is to push everyone to share everything they do, everywhere they go and everyone they meet. Online, for all to see. The problem is, they pretend that much more is private than is in reality, and they keep moving that line to suit their own needs, not their users' needs.

LinkedIn is another example of a company that started off with seemingly good intent, but can't resist the temptation to take advantage of the fact that their users trust them with lots of personal data.

So my question is: both of you state that you don't trust these companies, but do you use their services? Any of them? Do you take active measures to thwart their data-gathering tools? (You don't need to explicitly sign up for their services to have your personal information scraped as you cruise the web). Or have you caved into the "free" (yeah, right!) aspect of these systems, and passed all your professional info to LinkedIn and signed up for gmail? I have not.
No Matte == No Sale :-(
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No Matte == No Sale :-(
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post #48 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

It pleases me greatly to see more and more people finally paying attention to these issues. Too many lemmings these days reel out the "tinfoil hat" comments, but the ramifications of the personal and profiling data that these companies have on hundreds of millions of people is mind boggling and unprecedented in the history of the world. It's scary and dangerous.

Google's management will change over the coming years and they are under no legal obligation to hold their users' data private, nor are they "hack-proof", as the Chinese break-in proved. And for those of you who fear the gov't, they can practically single-source complete profiles of anyone they like from Google. Read this to confirm that they do. Scroll down to the bottom to see the US #s.

While Google may try in some ways to be a "good guy", Facebook doesn't even hide their intent, which is to push everyone to share everything they do, everywhere they go and everyone they meet. Online, for all to see. The problem is, they pretend that much more is private than is in reality, and they keep moving that line to suit their own needs, not their users' needs.

LinkedIn is another example of a company that started off with seemingly good intent, but can't resist the temptation to take advantage of the fact that their users trust them with lots of personal data.

So my question is: both of you state that you don't trust these companies, but do you use their services? Any of them? Do you take active measures to thwart their data-gathering tools? (You don't need to explicitly sign up for their services to have your personal information scraped as you cruise the web). Or have you caved into the "free" (yeah, right!) aspect of these systems, and passed all your professional info to LinkedIn and signed up for gmail? I have not.

Do you use any of their services? No No & No. I refuse to use any of their services. I don't use Google's search engine. It's the biggest tracking device on the Internet. Their search engine knows and saves everything you put into it and can profile even your thoughts and if you use gMail, or any of their services, it can put an identifying IP and name to that profile. I use no Google services. I use Bing only because I trust Google less than Microsoft and because I have a Yahoo email setup for spam. I refuse to have a Facebook page, never run my cursor over their buttons on web pages, and use DNT+ to block everything else. As for Linkedin, I never had a use for it but I wouldn't use it even if I did. I bet 99.9% of people using Facebook in the US doesn't realize that EVERYTHING put in it is the property of Facebook and can be used however they please. It's in their TOS. The EU has put a stop to this but not the US.
post #49 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljocampo View Post

Do you use any of their services? No No & No. I refuse to use any of their services. I don't use Google's search engine. It's the biggest tracking device on the Internet. Their search engine knows and saves everything you put into it and can profile even your thoughts and if you use gMail, or any of their services, it can put an identifying IP and name to that profile. I use no Google services. I use Bing only because I trust Google less than Microsoft and because I have a Yahoo email setup for spam. I refuse to have a Facebook page, never run my cursor over their buttons on web pages, and use DNT+ to block everything else. As for Linkedin, I never had a use for it but I wouldn't use it even if I did. I bet 99.9% of people using Facebook in the US doesn't realize that EVERYTHING put in it is the property of Facebook and can be used however they please. It's in their TOS. The EU has put a stop to this but not the US.

Good for you, you're one of the rare ones. I strongly recommend Little Snitch as well.

One thing left unsaid about gmail: you don't need to be a gmail user for google to be adding your info to their databases. Do your gmail-using friends send you email? Do they talk about things you'd rather google didn't stuff in their databases until the end of time? This is the trickiest thing to stop, and the only thing I don't have a good answer for yet. My solutions are either overly-harsh or under-effective.

Thanks for the head's up on DNT+. Last time I checked into Abine, what they were offering was not very mature (quite some time back), but it looks like it's worth investigating again.
No Matte == No Sale :-(
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No Matte == No Sale :-(
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