post #41 of 41
Excellent, well thought out post by Blah64.

As for the "advice" offered by the Motley Fool site, that might have worked for a trader (hoping to exit a long position or go short). But even if it had been accurate, what did the writer see in Apple's fundamentals that would have made that trade work for the medium to long term?

This reminds me of a (anti-Apple) poster on another site who realized that I was long AAPL, and proceeded to give me a hard time when it dipped down from the $350's to below $320 last year. I told him that I wasn't even thinking about selling (as nothing fundamentally had changed), and I was in fact buying some Aug calls. I suggested that he dig into his piggy bank and also buy some calls. He, of course, did not. And once he realized how much I made off that call purchase, he actually stopped posting on that site. I'm sure that wasn't the only reason he left. But after being there for almost 10 years, and never liking to be hit with an "I told you so", that appeared to be the final straw.

I really like Apple's products. But I'm not married to the stock. If/when It breaks down, I'll sell. I see no reason to sell a stock that is continuing to rise. Sell the losers, keep the winners. Along the way, I may buy/sell puts or calls to protect myself. But no matter what, I'll still like their products - as I have since the mid 80's. But this is about generating the highest possible returns, not falling in love with a stock symbol.
If two people always agree, then one of them is redundant.
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If two people always agree, then one of them is redundant.
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