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Comparison finds iTunes 1080p video nears Blu-ray disc quality - Page 6

post #201 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

Not the ones from the iTunes store. The new 1080p downloads use High-Profile H.264 which the AppleTV 2 is not capable of decoding.

So so let me get get this straight The stuff I've ripped from my HD DVDs and Blu-ray discs I can play on it but not their own stuff wow.

And that's a hardware limitation, isn't it? Dang shame.

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post #202 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

You also miss the fact that tens of millions of iPhone 4/4S, iPad 2/3 can play these 1080P movies connected through HDMI to an HD television.

Yes, my mistake, though it looks like Apple also made a mistake and modified their document at http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4095

"1080p content is only compatible with iPad (3rd generation), Apple TV (3rd generation), and computers that meet the minimum system requirements. HD content purchased directly on iPad 2 or earlier will continue to download in 720p. You may still download the 1080p version using the Purchased page on your computer based on availability. "

All in all, got my AppleTV yesterday and it's all peachy, along with all the usual Apple gear.

Note that for Airplay and iTunes WiFi syncing to ensure seamless results you gotta bite the bullet and get an Airport Extreme or Airport Express. I had a decent wireless router for a good price but ah... what the heck, home is suitably Apple-i-fied now.
post #203 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

So… so… …let me get… get this straight… The stuff I've ripped from my HD DVDs and Blu-ray discs… I can play on it… but not their own stuff… … wow.

And that's a hardware limitation, isn't it? Dang shame.

There's all sorts of crazy ass limitations for years with iTunes content. I had previously been berated for complaining about HDCP protection which lets you watch protected content on your Mac but not an external monitor when connected via VGA or DVI.

At least 1080p is available throughout new AppleTV, new iPad and existing Macs... They could've gone the AppleTV-only route which based on my earlier observations could have been something they seriously considered.
post #204 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Nice speech.

Now back to topic, how is giving Apple $8 to rent a video any more convenient for me than going 400m to get the same movie on Blu-ray for $3.33 (the rental price I paid yesterday for a blu-ray).

Because today I woke up, was half asleep, didn't want to leave my new pet cricket (not kidding, it doesn't seem to want to leave the house), didn't have to drive, didn't have to spend petrol or release carbon emissions, managed to rent a 1080p movie on AppleTV for ~$5 USD/AUD, and don't have to use up physical media.

Not saying it's perfect for everyone, but I do see the value. Of course, the key is quality broadband with sufficient quota, which was what prevented me from using AppleTV in the past. As always, gawd bless the first world.
post #205 of 208
(Please excuse the serial postings, I just got my AppleTV and want to address some points)

Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

When did 2.35:1 become a Blu-ray specific aspect ratio?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

The movie comes in the ratio in which it is distributed. Not all Blu-ray content is 2.39:1, and not all SD and 720 content was 16:9. Apple has supported all three ratios for years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by @tiger View Post

Hollywood blockbusters are usually filmed in 2.39:1 aspect ratio, so most Blu-ray movies comes in the very same aspect ratio.

I am thinking of buying the Philips Cinema 21:9 television (http://www.philips.co.uk/c/televisio...B4.app101-drp1), therefore it would be nice to know. I appreciate all info on this subject. Thanks.

AFAIK, the iTunes content is encoded in whatever aspect ratio it's supposed to be in, like 2.3+:1, 1.8+:1, 16:9 and so on.

If you can afford it, the Cinema televisions seem sweet.

Note however that AFAIK there's no "anamorphic" encoding for the latest iTunes 1080p and 720p. It used to be a good advantage during the days of DVD because instead of wasting encoding space with black bars, videos would be "squeezed" into the resolution available and then "widened" out for cinema aspect ratios, and some people used this technique for AppleTV2... See: http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1331127

So, the Cinema television you mentioned above has a native resolution of 2560 x 1080. Which is nice because any 16:9 content will be shown as purely native 1920x1080 pixels. However, if there is BluRay or iTunes 1080p content, usually, this will be ~upscaled~ by the TV to 2560x1080 from whatever it was encoded in, say Lord of the Rings at approx. 1920x800 pixels.

At the end of the day, is it going to give you the value and feeling you're after? As much as I would love to see anamorphic 1080p encodes for any aspect ratio wider than 16:9, for now, it's "good enough" for most people. Because when you play the resolution game, there's no end to it... 2K, 4K, until you max out the human perception, then there's 3D, implants, holographic, extra-sensory etc. But I suppose technology will progress.

Remember the iPad resolution too... For the new iPad you'd need around 3K in resolution to display native pixels:



Try out some content with the new TV at the store to see if you're happy with it.
post #206 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunilraman View Post

Because today I woke up, was half asleep, didn't want to leave my new pet cricket (not kidding, it doesn't seem to want to leave the house), didn't have to drive, didn't have to spend petrol or release carbon emissions, managed to rent a 1080p movie on AppleTV for ~$5 USD/AUD, and don't have to use up physical media.

Not saying it's perfect for everyone, but I do see the value. Of course, the key is quality broadband with sufficient quota, which was what prevented me from using AppleTV in the past. As always, gawd bless the first world.

According to the Aussie iTunes Store the new release HD rentals are AU$7, that is NZ$9, I can rent three new release Blu-rays for NZ$10, you are more than welcome to spend your money how you see fit, personally I don't give it away when I don't need to. Also the use of electronic devices generally required the production of electricity, and the vast majority of electricity production requires the release of carbon emissions somewhere in the process, so don't try and kid yourself there...
post #207 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunilraman View Post

There's all sorts of crazy ass limitations for years with iTunes content. I had previously been berated for complaining about HDCP protection which lets you watch protected content on your Mac but not an external monitor when connected via VGA or DVI.

DVI supports HDCP
post #208 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunilraman View Post

They could've gone the AppleTV-only route which based on my earlier observations could have been something they seriously considered.

I think the article you originally quoted was merely poorly worded, nothing more. They had not made it clear that the article concerned AppleTV only, so when they said 1080p was viewable only on the AppleTV 3, they simply meant that it wasn't compatible with AppleTV 1 or 2. They were not making any statement on compatibility of 1080p content with other devices.
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