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Apple, others challenged to make digital textbooks a reality in five years

post #1 of 52
Thread Starter 
Apple along with a number of tech industry leaders, took part in a discussion on Thursday to explore how a joint effort backed by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission and Department of Education can implement digital textbooks in the nation's K-12 public schools.

Hosted by FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, the meeting fleshed out to transition all U.S. K-12 schools to a fully digital interactive learning environment within the next five years.

Attendees included representatives from tech heavyweights Apple, Samsung, Intel and Kno; publishers Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, McGraw-Hill, News Corp. and Pearson; telecoms Sprint and T-Mobile; and governmental bodies the LEAD Commission and the Idaho Department of Education, among others.

Chairman Genachowski and Secreatary Duncan issued the group a challenge to develop a low-cost, high quality solution for interactive digital textbooks consisting of device, content, connectivity, and technical support for use in America's classrooms.

According to an FCC-evaluated Project RED study, schools can save up to $250 per student per year if a digital ecosystem is implemented over the traditional textbook-and-paper used in classrooms today. Besides the initial cost savings, the prospect of upgrading to more current media in the future would be substantially less expensive than the current model which sees $7 billion spent in new textbooks each year. Digital textbooks would also enable a more uniform learning experience as new content can be pushed out nationwide at regular intervals.

A digital learning environment can reduce the amount of time it takes a student to learn a topic by up to 80 percent, said the Department of Education and a recent studies by the National Training and Simulation Association. A separate PBS study found that 93 percent of teachers believe that interactive whiteboards are positive learning tools, with 81 percent feeling the same about tablets.


iBooks textbooks are already available on Apple's iPad. | Source: Apple


While technology in the classroom has been found to be beneficial in the classroom, getting a new ecosystem up and running will take some time. To that end, the Leading Education by Advancing Digital (LEAD) Commission was established earlier in March to facilitate the rapid adoption of new media content in the education sector.

In January, the "Digital Textbook Playbook" was announced to help teachers bring technology to the classroom by taking down the "major barriers to the adoption of digital textbooks, including the challenge of connectivity, both at school, in the community, and at home; the challenge of device procurement; and the challenge of making the transition from paper to digital textbooks."


The Digital Textbook Playbook offers an outline of new media for the classroom. | Source: FCC


Apple has always been active in the education market, going as far as releasing classroom-specific computer models like the eMac and offering student and teacher product discounts. The company's latest education initiative, iBooks textbooks, was announced in January and could be a strong contender for the FCC and DOE plan. Of the major publishers at Thursday's discussion, three already offer content to through the iBooks store.

[ View article on AppleInsider ]
post #2 of 52
After farting around for hours this morning on the forums, I think I'll finally get to proper work on an iBook. Will share the research in a dedicated thread in the iPad section of the forum if anyone's interested.
post #3 of 52
The future, by that photo, seems to be a 12 PowerBook...
post #4 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

The future, by that photo, seems to be a 12 PowerBook...

Yep!

post #5 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

The future, by that photo, seems to be a 12 PowerBook...

Excellent! I still have mine.
post #6 of 52
am I the only one a little sad about this sort of thing? I look at my book shelf and see a great thing, astheticly brautiful and eligant, and the books are usefull - you can read them without logging in and getting DRM approval, you can rely on them to bne there and not just randomly disappear when tehre is a copyright dispute (a la Orwell's "1984" on Kindle a while back) and most importantly, the right of first sale, that is it is mine, I can let you borrow it, I can give it to you, I can let you borrow it, I could donate it to a library and so on.


Also, once it is printed, bound and shipped the text cant change, just look at "apps" being continuously updated: whats to stop an author from adding or subtracting something after publication? whats to stop the distribution company, publisher, or government from doing the same thing?
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post #7 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_greer View Post

am I the only one a little sad about this sort of thing? I look at my book shelf and see a great thing, astheticly brautiful and eligant, and the books are usefull - you can read them without logging in and getting DRM approval, you can rely on them to bne there and not just randomly disappear when tehre is a copyright dispute (a la Orwell's "1984" on Kindle a while back) and most importantly, the right of first sale, that is it is mine, I can let you borrow it, I can give it to you, I can let you borrow it, I could donate it to a library and so on.


Also, once it is printed, bound and shipped the text cant change, just look at "apps" being continuously updated: whats to stop an author from adding or subtracting something after publication? whats to stop the distribution company, publisher, or government from doing the same thing?

Here's the problem: Textbooks are just too damned expensive. Also, they aren't updatable, other than by replacing them. This presents a huge problem for school districts with less and less money and funding.

I mean, I'm sure you know all of this. And I do agree that I love a physical book as well, assuming it's a very nice one. But it it's just sort of your average paperback, I'd rather get the digital version these days (just bought Rachel Maddow's "Drift" and also "Hunger Games" this last week).

And also, off-topic but sort of connected, if I didn't feel guilty over how well my Local Comics Shop has treated me over the years, I'd have gone totally digital for comics months and months ago. No more bagging and boarding. No more stacks of long boxes. Yeesh. But I can't let my LCS down like that.
post #8 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_greer View Post

am I the only one a little sad about this sort of thing? I look at my book shelf and see a great thing, astheticly brautiful and eligant, and the books are usefull - you can read them without logging in and getting DRM approval, you can rely on them to bne there and not just randomly disappear when tehre is a copyright dispute (a la Orwell's "1984" on Kindle a while back) and most importantly, the right of first sale, that is it is mine, I can let you borrow it, I can give it to you, I can let you borrow it, I could donate it to a library and so on.

Also, once it is printed, bound and shipped the text cant change, just look at "apps" being continuously updated: whats to stop an author from adding or subtracting something after publication? whats to stop the distribution company, publisher, or government from doing the same thing?

No you're not the only one. I really enjoy wandering around my local bookstore on a Sunday afternoon. I love the look and the feel of the books. And yes it's nice to switch off my computer and sit and read a good book in the evening. That's why I don't think books with ever disappear.

However, I can also remember as a student in the 80's being thoroughly bored reading my textbooks. They were just so lifeless and we often ended up with books that were years out of date. They were also very heavy from what I remember lol.

Kids these days grow up in an interactive world with computers in one form or another all around them. I think eTextBooks are a great idea. Finally you can bring the subject to life, engage the students in a way I never was. All the studies show that if learning is fun the kids enjoy it more and learn more.
post #9 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

No you're not the only one. I really enjoy wandering around my local bookstore on a Sunday afternoon.

All depends on the use case?

Short-term updatable interactive learning > eBook.

Long-term static literature > Book.

The only challenge will be increasing prices of books, as cheaper eBooks will be around. Good news vinyls are still around and produced despite CD & now MP3s ;-) And from a price-perspective what I have seen here in Europe, they aren't really over-the-top. If you love them, you still can afford them.
post #10 of 52
I am much less concerned about the look and feel of books. Though I like the tactile nature of books I mind reading digital books.

What concerns me more is what has already been mentioned about the control of "knowledge" and the updating of history based on who is now in control/in charge.

What concerns me most is that this digital format is not necessarily the best way to learn. I can definitely say that with anything digital, whether on the screen of my Mac or on my Kindle, I do not have the same type of recall relative to a physical book.

I don't necessarily agree that just because books have a higher cost and have fixed data sets that that somehow makes them less valuable. We are jumping into all digital way too quick and I don't think we have enough information to know whether we achieve the same type of learning.
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post #11 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmo8020 View Post

All depends on the use case?

Short-term updatable interactive learning > eBook.

Long-term static literature > Book.

The only challenge will be increasing prices of books, as cheaper eBooks will be around. Good news vinyls are still around and produced despite CD & now MP3s ;-) And from a price-perspective what I have seen here in Europe, they aren't really over-the-top. If you love them, you still can afford them.

I think there's a bigger challenge.

We already have states in the US forcing textbook manufacturers to leave out controversial topics or discuss them in politically correct ways. When Texas or California takes a stand on how an issue is to be taught, it ends up affecting the entire country - because textbook manufacturers have traditionally refused to produce multiple versions of a book for different states. I hope that eBooks makes it easier for textbook manufacturers to satisfy state requirements without making the rest of the country suffer.

The simplest example, of course, would be that they could simply remove the evolution chapter from the Kansas biology books if Kansas continues with its silly anti-evolution stance. I would hope that eBooks would make this easier, rather than harder.

Of course, the best thing would be if petty radical politicians didn't let their political views interfere with properly educating our kids, but I really don't expect our politicians to grow up soon.
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post #12 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by .:R2theT View Post


I don't necessarily agree that just because books have a higher cost and have fixed data sets that that somehow makes them less valuable. We are jumping into all digital way too quick and I don't think we have enough information to know whether we achieve the same type of learning.

Actual books have become priced out of the ability for many districts to buy in the numbers needed.

Sure, if everyone somehow had unlimited resources, that would be great. But in the real world in which we live, that's not the case.

And being able to update one section of a history text (say after an election or revolution or what not) without needing to replace the entire thing is a huge cost savings.
post #13 of 52
Imagine if all the schools were private and competing with each other? They would have deployed digital textbooks long ago.
post #14 of 52
Consider our knowledge of archeology, paleontology, physics, and astronomy, for starters. Pretty much gets rewritten every year. eBooks.
post #15 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

The future, by that photo, seems to be a 12 PowerBook...

You see how thick the bottom case is? Urggh!!!
post #16 of 52
Quote:
Attendees included representatives from tech heavyweights Apple, Samsung, Intel and Kno; publishers Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, McGraw-Hill, News Corp. and Pearson; telecoms Sprint and T-Mobile; and governmental bodies the LEAD Commission and the Idaho Department of Education, among others.

Apple under SJ conceived and produced disruptive technology. Apple products and services based on them do not play well with the entrenched industries that "own" their markets. Currently, a few big entities "own" educational publishing the disastrous federal Dept of Education and the above mentioned publishers who decide how and what all students in this country will be taught.

I can't quote chapter and verse but SJ had a very low opinion of US education, and by extension those responsible for its current state. So I would be very interested in hearing how Apple could get seriously involved with education and remain on good terms with these guys.
post #17 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_greer View Post

Also, once it is printed, bound and shipped the text cant change, just look at "apps" being continuously updated: whats to stop an author from adding or subtracting something after publication? whats to stop the distribution company, publisher, or government from doing the same thing?

This is a very real concern. Educational material should be required to conform to a set of federally regulated design controls, complete with regular federal audits of each company's quality system.

For those who think I'm proposing that the government should dictate what can and can't be written in textbooks, no. Regulated design controls merely force a company to document their changes and provide proof for their reasoning. Content matter is essentially unaffected.

Edit:
The most important reason to do this is the creation of a "change history" that would hopefully be made public.
post #18 of 52
Digitally available textbooks is a good idea in theory. Along with appropriate interactive material (not entertainment) such as simulations of processes in the STEM area, it could improve learning in schools, and learning outside of school, in less formal environments.

Then, if the material can be broken down into appropriate chunks, and learning management and assessment of mastery is included, we may have the making of knowledgeable and skilled population.

But, I cannot say today that the textbooks and curriculum offered today, nor the extreme pressure by anti-intellectual forces in the US will result in a more educated public. Perhaps instead, the promise of digital textbooks will fail as did the promise of access to knowledge and information via the internet and TV, replaced instead by pseudo-news, opinion and downright propaganda and lies.

Knowledge is not counted by the number of textbooks and iPads in a school, or the counts of the number of students with access to iPads. The only thing that counts is the content.
post #19 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

Knowledge is not counted by the number of textbooks and iPads in a school, or the counts of the number of students with access to iPads. The only thing that counts is the content.

Tunnel vision FTL!

Perfect Content + Poor Delivery = FAIL

Content is just the beginning, and digital content will stand a better chance of improvement due to ease of iteration. Regardless, and against your point, content is only the beginning.
post #20 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronJ View Post

Here's the problem: Textbooks are just too damned expensive. Also, they aren't updatable, other than by replacing them. This presents a huge problem for school districts with less and less money and funding.

I mean, I'm sure you know all of this. And I do agree that I love a physical book as well, assuming it's a very nice one. But it it's just sort of your average paperback, I'd rather get the digital version these days (just bought Rachel Maddow's "Drift" and also "Hunger Games" this last week).

And also, off-topic but sort of connected, if I didn't feel guilty over how well my Local Comics Shop has treated me over the years, I'd have gone totally digital for comics months and months ago. No more bagging and boarding. No more stacks of long boxes. Yeesh. But I can't let my LCS down like that.

Textbooks aren't expensive because of the printing cost. Textbooks are expensive because of the writing, editorial, marketing and rights clearance (photos, etc.) costs. None of those costs go away for eTexts. In fact, producing eTexts can be more expensive because now you've got to have trained people who can add layers of interactivity and the nature of the medium demands more art, photos, videos, animations and mini-apps within the textbook. Someone's going to be paying for that.

And especially at the college level, publishers want textbooks to be out of date. That's why they issue new editions every two years whether they're actually needed or not - it's to prevent students from buying used books. Publishers cannot survive if all of a sudden, they're selling $15 textbooks instead of $150 textbooks, unless the mass market is now buying those eBooks instead of just students taking the courses.

And for El-Hi school textbooks in half of the U.S. States, mostly in the west and south, publishers must go through an adoption process, where a highly political State board must approve the textbooks before they can be sold in the state. This process is extremely expensive. And if you lose the adoption, you're basically out of business for the next several years. California, Texas and Florida are the biggest adoption states and the entire country winds up getting what they demand. This is the reason why there has been tremendous consolidation in the El-Hi textbook industry in the last 30 years and there are just a few players left.

While I have no problem if the publishers themselves elect to publish eTexts, I don't think public money should be used to drive this process. That would be money much better spent teaching kids to read properly. After the initial novelty wears off, a student is no more likely to read an eText than they were to read a textbook. They can both still be incredibly boring.
post #21 of 52
Almost every reader loves bound books, but very few are actually buying them. I've never had to wait in line at the book register at my local Barnes & Noble, even though there are 40 or 50 people in the store reading at any given time. Aside from the Starbucks sales, which always seem to be doing way better than the book sales, the overhead in the massive, fully staffed store vs. the register activity has to be unsustainable for much longer, I would guess.
post #22 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

Digitally available textbooks is a good idea in theory. Along with appropriate interactive material (not entertainment) such as simulations of processes in the STEM area, it could improve learning in schools, and learning outside of school, in less formal environments.

Then, if the material can be broken down into appropriate chunks, and learning management and assessment of mastery is included, we may have the making of knowledgeable and skilled population.

But, I cannot say today that the textbooks and curriculum offered today, nor the extreme pressure by anti-intellectual forces in the US will result in a more educated public. Perhaps instead, the promise of digital textbooks will fail as did the promise of access to knowledge and information via the internet and TV, replaced instead by pseudo-news, opinion and downright propaganda and lies.

Knowledge is not counted by the number of textbooks and iPads in a school, or the counts of the number of students with access to iPads. The only thing that counts is the content.

How has the promise of access to knowledge and information via the internet failed? The Internet has very much delivered on giving us access to information. Anyone who has information to share can do so, and for the most part it will not be filtered out.
post #23 of 52
My concern is that in the "OMG we're gonna save so much money" rush will be lost the cost of the delivery vehicle. Maybe all homes and families will have access to the devices in the future, but how in the heck is a school system going to financially support this endeavor?

Maybe if the system provided armored, waterproof cases for each unit (there goes another couple hundred $ per unit)

Think about how you treated your books in school. I usually turned mine back in in fairly good shape, but they weren't made of glass either. Maybe I'm not realizing that there won't be homework in the future, and 5th grade kids won't have to run thru the rain to get on the bus...

I love the idea for college students, but many colleges/universities are already there.
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post #24 of 52
I love the idea of text books finally becoming a digital reality but the current state of the iPad has me worried. It's to thick and way to heavy. You can argue with me all you want but we need a device that is under 7mm thick, half the weight of the current iPad, a lot more ruggedized and a lot more battery life. Apple had to increase their battery size almost two fold to sustain their ten hours of battery life with LTE.

I want a education model to address those needs, it doesn't need to be the fastest or have mobile wireless. Just a light weight, long lasting, rugged, miniSD including, education machine.
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post #25 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

the current state of the iPad has me worried. It's to thick and way to heavy.

Man up.

Ah, sorry, that expression's a little inaccurate here, isn't it?

Honestly, it still weighs less than the first iPad and if you can't carry around 1.4 lbs, you weren't carrying around your textbooks to begin with.

Quote:
You can argue with me all you want but we need a device that is under 7mm thick, half the weight of the current iPad, a lot more ruggedized and a lot more battery life.

No, "we" don't. There's no pressing need for it to be thinner, there's no pressing need for it to have a longer battery life, and there's no pressing need for it to weigh less.

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miniSD including

Just buy an Android tablet and be done with it.

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post #26 of 52
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Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Man up.

Ah, sorry, that expression's a little inaccurate here, isn't it?

Honestly, it still weighs less than the first iPad and if you can't carry around 1.4 lbs, you weren't carrying around your textbooks to begin with.



No, "we" don't. There's no pressing need for it to be thinner, there's no pressing need for it to have a longer battery life, and there's no pressing need for it to weigh less.



Just buy an Android tablet and be done with it.

I have a Android tablet, the Samsung Galaxy 7.7" that is kind of what I was basing my perfect education tablet off of. I think it needs to be at least 8.9" though and a bit more ruggedized . The 12.5 hour battery is defiantly a move in the right direction but I would like to see that increased by 6 hours. Then of course made by Apple because their the ones with iBooks. Look, I want it as close to a piece of paper as possible which brings up another thing to add to my wish list a pen. A active digitizer pen to be exact. I understand Steve Jobs said that the future was with the finger but I think there is still a lot benefits that can be had with a pen. My Galaxy Note showed me that, I can't believe every tablet doesn't support it actually. Drawing, highlighting, adding handwritten notes to a article, filling out PDF forms, the list goes on and on, for an educational tablet it's a must.

Yes, it's your duty as an Apple fan to shutdown my ideas to hell because Apple doesn't have such a device yet. I mean why should they, Apple is doing just fine selling people the absolute minimum they can get away with, so they have something for the next model. That's great and all and it seems to please most of you but I really wish Apple would gamble a little bit now and then instead of releasing the safe option.
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post #27 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

There's no pressing need for it to be thinner, there's no pressing need for it to have a longer battery life, and there's no pressing need for it to weigh less.

There's no pressing need for you to constantly criticise every imaginative suggestion on here but you still do it post after post.

I would certainly welcome an iPad that lasts a full 3 day business trip or weekend away and weighs less in my briefcase.
post #28 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

I would certainly welcome an iPad that lasts a full 3 day business trip or weekend away and weighs less in my briefcase.

I'm sure everybody would love to carry a iDevice with 3-4x battery than the current ipad but is that even possible with the current battery technology?
I'm sure you know the answer.

my way or the highway...

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post #29 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

There's no pressing need for you to constantly criticise every imaginative suggestion on here but you still do it post after post.

I would certainly welcome an iPad that lasts a full 3 day business trip or weekend away and weighs less in my briefcase.

Funny how things keep changing. In the 80s we had a client server model where the application an the data was stored on a remote server. Then we got the distributed model where everything was stored on the local machine. Now we are moving toward a return of the previous model where everything is stored in the cloud. Eventually I think we will see a massive increase in RAM, network speed and huge amounts of battery power. At that point the ginormous size of iBooks will be easily managed without compromise. IMO there is nothing worse than dumbing down education, especially because of inadequacies in technology.

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post #30 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutykamu View Post

I'm sure everybody would love to carry a iDevice with 3-4x battery than the current ipad but is that even possible with the current battery technology?
I'm sure you know the answer.

At the same weight AND with a battery tech that can recharged a 1000x AND at a reasonable price? Nope.

It's one thing for people to have an imagination but they also need to make sure their futuristic wishes don't cross into reality as stupid comments about what Apple (or others) should do. For example, it really sounds crazy (I literally mean insane) when people say that it's too heavy when another tablet is lighter (while ignoring that the other tablet has half the screen area and less battery life).

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post #31 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronJ View Post

Actual books have become priced out of the ability for many districts to buy in the numbers needed.

Sure, if everyone somehow had unlimited resources, that would be great. But in the real world in which we live, that's not the case.

And being able to update one section of a history text (say after an election or revolution or what not) without needing to replace the entire thing is a huge cost savings.

You seem to not have understood what I was trying to get across.

My argument was that digital learning isn't necessarily the best way to learn and definitely not for all students.

And this idea that books have become to high-priced just doesn't stand up to reason. Unless a district has decided to tell a different version of the Revolutionary War or the Civil War or whatever there should rarely be any reason to change texts.

And your willingness to have something like a history text just updated is very trusting. Have you read 1984? To move solely to digital media for schooling purposes I think would make Orwell turn over.

First it was computers. Then the internet. Now it is tablet/e-readers. When the next thing comes along somewhere in the next 10 years to make Apple (or the next Apple) billions of dollars will everyone jump on that bandwagon as well? I enjoy the entertainment of the digital age; but do we ever ask where it is leading other than to huge companies like Apple, Google and Microsoft having way too much influence into and over our lives and the lives of everyone around us?
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post #32 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_greer View Post

Also, once it is printed, bound and shipped the text cant change, just look at "apps" being continuously updated: whats to stop an author from adding or subtracting something after publication? whats to stop the distribution company, publisher, or government from doing the same thing?

Lack of updating is the problem. remember we are talking about textbooks, workbooks etc. Not novels

these materials need to be updated and even corrected from time to time. And yet in many cases, due to price etc schools will keep using the same book for 5-10 years. Sometimes even the same copies. they get drawn in, dropped in water etc. And woe to the kid that gets a messed up textbook where the teachers photocopied and taped in missing pages.

Not to mention that these things are heavy and for security reasons many schools are removing lockers so the kids can't go and swap out books between classes. My little brothers are in the 4th grade and have to carry almost their body weight in books and notebooks every day.

Plus if you use them correctly you can have interaction materials that score the kids right away, adjust questions for those that are having trouble or are getting it quickly (giving them harder questions). The apps can reduce cheating by randomly selecting questions for each kid. You can have whiteboard apps that allow kids to ask questions from their desks anonymously and avoid embarrassment that stops many kids from speaking up. Same with answering questions.

You can also support other things like Art and Music on the iPad. Or even bring back things like dissection labs in biology classes. My sister's class didn't do any such labs due to the high cost of getting the worms and frogs and such. While i found that activity to be a tad gross, I do think they should learn how animal systems go together and a virtual frog app could be just the solution. Social studies classes could benefit from having FaceTime pals from other countries so they can hear about life in wherever from someone living there rather than outdated materials in a 10 year old textbook.

And so on.

And then when they come home they can curl up with a book for actual reading, which might for some still mean ink on paper.

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post #33 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by apersona View Post

I can't quote chapter and verse but SJ had a very low opinion of US education, and by extension those responsible for its current state. So I would be very interested in hearing how Apple could get seriously involved with education and remain on good terms with these guys.

Over the years I have found myself agreeing with many things Steve said about the US education system. For example, he was against just dumping computers in classrooms to say you have computers in the classrooms. He felt that it wouldn't change a thing and he was likely right. If you are going to use tech it needs to be thought out so that it melds into the overall system. Rather than just being there to be there. Steve also felt that the quality of teachers was a big issue. Unions were blocking the removal of mediocre and even bad teachers. And he could be right about that as well. I had plenty of teachers in middle and high school that were pretty bad. They clearly didn't want to be there anymore, they basically had us read the book in class, never answered questions. And yet they are still teaching in the same schools.

As for Apple, they are dealing more with the textbook companies and school districts rather than actual teachers and for those groups it's about profit for the one and savings for the other.

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(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #34 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuzDots View Post

My concern is that in the "OMG we're gonna save so much money" rush will be lost the cost of the delivery vehicle. Maybe all homes and families will have access to the devices in the future, but how in the heck is a school system going to financially support this endeavor?

Maybe if the system provided armored, waterproof cases for each unit (there goes another couple hundred $ per unit)


Then my step sibs were invited to be a part of an iPad pilot program this year they were required to put down a $500 deposit a piece for their school provided iPad. It would be used to buy a replacement if they broke it. If they didn't, at the end of the year Mom and Dad get the money back.

This is a private school so I don't know if there are legal restrictions that would stop the public schools from requiring something like this. That said, now they can buy Apple Care + and save a bundle on broken iPads. I suppose for lost ones they can use the same 'you lost it you pay for it' system that many use for paper textbooks.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #35 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

I love the idea of text books finally becoming a digital reality but the current state of the iPad has me worried. It's to thick and way to heavy. You can argue with me all you want but we need a device that is under 7mm thick, half the weight of the current iPad, a lot more ruggedized and a lot more battery life. Apple had to increase their battery size almost two fold to sustain their ten hours of battery life with LTE..

Disagree on all counts. The size and weight are not an issue, the battery life is longer than a kid will be at school (and won't be using LTE) etc.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #36 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

I would certainly welcome an iPad that lasts a full 3 day business trip or weekend away and weighs less in my briefcase.

Of course you would. but it isn't a 'pressing need' in order for the device to work as an educational tool.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #37 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

Disagree on all counts. The size and weight are not an issue, the battery life is longer than a kid will be at school (and won't be using LTE) etc.

Well I have children and getting them to charge their phones is a choir. I see the way children handle there things and I know what they need. Of course you disagree because Apple doesn't make it yet. I said that when I posted my wish list, that people like you only like things that are currently out. The second Apple does come out with one you will be all over it, watch.
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #38 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutykamu View Post

I'm sure everybody would love to carry a iDevice with 3-4x battery than the current ipad but is that even possible with the current battery technology?
I'm sure you know the answer.

3 to 4x times no, 2 to 3x yes absolutely.
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #39 of 52
It always comes down to money...this is no different. Until they work out a pricing plan that publishers are comfortable with...this isn't gonna take off. Then you have school budgets to worry about...everything sounds great on paper and until they actually setup some curriculum and test it for a few years in a control setting, no one can HONESTLY claim ebooks is better method to educate our kids.
post #40 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

There's no pressing need for you to constantly criticize every imaginative suggestion on here but you still do it post after post.

There's imaginative and then there's completely nonsensical.

This criticism is a holdover from the days where people actually believed that the flights of fancy they posted were legitimate demands that Apple had to meet.

"So yesterday."

Yes.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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