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Apple to build 200K 15-in. MacBook Pros in April, 400K 13-in. units in June - Page 2

post #41 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcsegenmd View Post

I suspect the MB Air moniker will disappear as will MB Pro. Don't forget Apple's obsession with simplifying the product names. One can easily envision the names
Macbook 11
Macbook 13
Macbook 15
Macbook 17
which would mean that the only decision left to the consumer is how big; seems simple to me. I'm just hoping that the MB 15 can take 16 Gb of ram, 'cause I have 4 on my 2010 and it hangs up more often than it should, especially when working with 300Mb+ files

Current 15 inchworms well with 16gb.
I hope we get option for 1000gb ssd
post #42 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Right_said_fred View Post

I hope we get option for 1000gb ssd

We will.... several years from now.

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post #43 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSquirrel View Post

I see this come up every so often and I just don't think this is something we will ever see from Apple. I believe they will leave these solutions to your wireless carrier so you can get whatever solution they provide. I wouldn't want them building in a CDMA option if I lived in Europe and really, living here in the US, I have no interest in that option so it would be wasted space and money for me.

This feels like a very niche market need to me.


I suppose you have a case, especially since you don't need it. However, if you look at it from the perspective that since Verizon already allows tethering you only need the sim card LTE version and perhaps it could be ordered with and without like the iPad. Since the MBP is really considered to be a portable device I think a lot of people would opt for the feature. I know I would since I already have a solution in place with a wireless hotspot, but that requires carrying around an extra device and charger. Previously when the MBP had a express card slot I had a nice almost built in solution but they canceled that. I guess there are USB devices but I have not investigated. The nice thing about my current solution is that it is unlocked so when I travel overseas I can use a local sim.

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post #44 of 103
For one thing cost, having a bay that can take an SSD module or a magnetic drive is far more flexible than not. If the users needs revolve around lots of storage they can go the magnetic drive route. If they want speed they can go the SSD route.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iDave View Post

My thought was...since it's rumored the Pros will be much like the Airs (think thin) then why waste space putting in standard "2.5 inch" SSDs, especially two of them, when it would take up a lot less space just using a bunch of flash chips.

Well as I said flexibility is one big reward. Honestly though they don't need two HDD compliant bays. One could be exclusive to a SSD module and another could be a combo bay that could take a card or a drive. Notably such a design works well into a tapered laptop enclosure.
Quote:

I don't think a standard SSD would even fit into the current MBA case, would it? Maybe the Pros will be a little thicker, but not likely.

We are talking a MBP here not an AIR, but no most SSD/HDD modules will not fit into an AIR. Lets not forget that their is a big difference between looking like an AIR and actually being an AIR. Apple could easily make a thinner laptop, that is tapered, with room for a conventional disk drive.

Quote:

I agree with what you're implying, that a Pro computer should have lots of storage. Knowing Apple, I think it's likely the only option will be flash storage at whatever price they want to charge.

Possibly. But if they go solid state only then the demand for multiple slots is only greater because you don't have the density to server pro user needs in one module. At least not at reasonable costs, even though those costs are dropping rapidly.
Quote:

Spinning HD drives are a thing of the past, don't you know?

There is no truth in that. In fact if they get the laser based technology going this year we should see some really amazing capacity jumps in hard drives. Magnetic drives will be the capacity leaders for a few more years.
post #45 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSquirrel View Post

I see this come up every so often and I just don't think this is something we will ever see from Apple. I believe they will leave these solutions to your wireless carrier so you can get whatever solution they provide. I wouldn't want them building in a CDMA option if I lived in Europe and really, living here in the US, I have no interest in that option so it would be wasted space and money for me.

This feels like a very niche market need to me.

As mstone stated, it is a mobile device. They even have Find My Mac and and Remote Lock (it's actually locked in the firmware). I don't think they offer Remote Wipe.

I'd think it would be a $130 option like in the iPad and would be optional. I'd also expect it to be removable in the much the same way you can add and remove RAM.

Note that Apple has already had something similar to this with their original AirPort cards. It used a physically similar (but not electrically) mini-PCIe slot for their WiFI cards. This is how their MBA's SSD card works. If you look at the size of the cellular daughter board in the iPad it's quite small. I think this could be effective.

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post #46 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

sounds like your MBP is rather old! As such any upgrade you get should look impressive.

Yeah, I think it is 2007 but it still suits my needs just fine since I only use it when I travel and it runs Lion and CS5 satisfactorily. I don't really need to upgrade except for the ML issue. When I bought it I opted for the max ram and all upgrades possible. These Macs remain serviceable for an incredibly long time.


Quote:
Unfortunately I'm not a big fan at all of the current iMac design! I'd rather see the often mentioned XMac. That being said the chips that will be available for a new iMac design could result in a very impressive design performance wise. I just won't go the iMac route until Apple addresses the serviceability issues. The laptops prove they can do a decent design so there is hope.

I'm looking for a new iMac for home to replace an older one so my requirements are not that extreme there either. It is just used for casual computing. I use a Mac Pro at the office.

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post #47 of 103
So off to read the rest and then get some work done. However I must admit to being excited about the possibilities here. The new MBP have the potential to put a lot of new technology into our hands! They will likely be speed demonds too.
post #48 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Magnetic drives will be the capacity leaders for a few more years.

Even after magnetic drives are no longer the capacity leader for the same volume (they already aren't in smaller drives) they will continue to be the cost-per-GB leader for many years to come.

I know of several people worried about these rumours of the MBP following the MBA design. I don't think it's an issue since the MBP has followed the MBA in the past and a high capacity drive is more important today for a Pro user than the ODD was a few years ago and that's still hanging around.

The only legitimate issue are those that want the speed of the SSD and the capacity of the HDD via a dual drive system. This is less certain but I think Apple will offer this. Hopefully with a SSD card + HDD but they also have a patent for an SSD+HDD hybrid drive. I think the former is more likely.

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post #49 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I'd think it would be a $130 option like in the iPad and would be optional. I'd also expect it to be removable in the much the same way you can add and remove RAM.

It wouldn't be so bad having GPS in a MBP either. Could be useful for some apps.

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post #50 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by H2P View Post

Still believe the built-in optical drive makes the MBP distinct from the MBA. It's called Pro after all. Perhaps the 17" will retain the optical.

Really looking forward to the Ivy chips.

Optical Drives are the farthest thing from a Pro feature.

They have the smallest amount of purpose of any hardware features, add unnecessary weight, and basically dictate the entire design of the unit because of their ridiculously large size.

They need to be ditched, permanently, from all notebooks. Once every couple of months, you can plug in your USB CD drive when needed. There is no sensible argument to the contrary.
post #51 of 103
If the 15" is the powerhouse with portability that I hope it, I may have to try and pawn my Air off and get one.
MBA 13" i7/4GB/256GB

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MBA 13" i7/4GB/256GB

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post #52 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

It wouldn't be so bad having GPS in a MBP either. Could be useful for some apps.

OS X certainly supports Location Services and that is growing in ML.

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post #53 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Even after magnetic drives are no longer the capacity leader for the same volume (they already aren't in smaller drives) they will continue to be the cost-per-GB leader for many years to come.

I know of several people worried about these rumours of the MBP following the MBA design. I don't think it's an issue since the MBP has followed the MBA in the past and a high capacity drive is more important today for a Pro user than the ODD was a few years ago and that's still hanging around.

The only legitimate issue are those that want the speed of the SSD and the capacity of the HDD via a dual drive system. This is less certain but I think Apple will offer this. Hopefully with a SSD card + HDD but they also have a patent for an SSD+HDD hybrid drive. I think the former is more likely.

I feel its very likely that Apple offers a dual SSD+HDD solution in the new MBP.

Perhaps the same soldered SSD as in the MBA's for size purposes, and a real 2.5 HDD as well.

That would seem to be great for everyone, as there would be mass storage as well as speedy OS/Apps/Booting/etc.

I think they can do this and still save a lot of space, equating to a thinner/lighter design.
post #54 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

They have the smallest amount of purpose of any hardware features, add unnecessary weight, and basically dictate the entire design of the unit because of their ridiculously large size.

Have a lot of moving parts.
Are slow to read and write.
Use a lot of power when in operation.
Also dictate design by needing to be placed on an edge where ports could be placed.

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post #55 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

I feel its very likely that Apple offers a dual SSD+HDD solution in the new MBP.

Perhaps the same soldered SSD as in the MBA's for size purposes, and a real 2.5 HDD as well.

Note that it's not soldered to the logic board. That's the RAM, which I doubt would happen in the MBP. The SSD is a card that you can remove.

Quote:
That would seem to be great for everyone, as there would be mass storage as well as speedy OS/Apps/Booting/etc.

I think they can do this and still save a lot of space, equating to a thinner/lighter design.

I think that's the best solution. Depending on how thin they make the chassis they might be able to get away with a 7mm 2.5" drive. SSDs are typically 7mm while HDDs are 9.5mm.

However, there are single platter HDDs that are 7mm. I think 340GB is the current max per platter, which is admittedly low for my needs, but they could potentially offer two now that they can spread out the components better with the ODD gumming up the design. Most notably, placing the components along the back edge where it's thickest and closest to the vents.

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post #56 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

As mstone stated, it is a mobile device. They even have Find My Mac and and Remote Lock (it's actually locked in the firmware). I don't think they offer Remote Wipe.

I'd think it would be a $130 option like in the iPad and would be optional. I'd also expect it to be removable in the much the same way you can add and remove RAM.

Note that Apple has already had something similar to this with their original AirPort cards. It used a physically similar (but not electrically) mini-PCIe slot for their WiFI cards. This is how their MBA's SSD card works. If you look at the size of the cellular daughter board in the iPad it's quite small. I think this could be effective.

And I don't mind seeing something like that as a BTO option. A lot of the time when people put it forward tho, they take the tack that if it isn't built in standard it somehow makes the devices non-pro, which is stupid.
post #57 of 103
Wouldnt it be better to have a dedicated graphics card than an integrated 1. And i know this has been focused on only the 15 and 13 inch but what about the 17 inch?
post #58 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

I don't understand what is 'pro' about an optical drive. What do you need it for? I haven't bought physical software installation disks for over two years now, what use does it serve? I'm sure there will be a peripheral available for those that need one, but i can't imagine why anyone would need this in a portable device.

Because in a Pro portable device, I don't want something external that could be internal. And I still use the optical drive to receive files that are too big to email from other people and to transfer files from a non-networkable standalone CD-R drive. And I also burn music for people. As cheap as USB hard drive keys are, they're not as cheap as a blank CD-R.

In addition, some people still prefer DVDs (and Blu-rays for that matter) to streaming and downloadable files. What it really comes down to is why should I lose functionality when I "upgrade" to a new machine.

I agree with those who wonder what the difference is going to be between a MBA and a MBP. I would also consider a small solid-state drive to be a downgrade as well. I've put a 750GB drive into my MBP and that's what I need. As a consultant, I do lots of work for clients who do not want their files in the Cloud.

I think Apple is going to be making a big mistake if they don't maintain a distinction between these lines. They will lose the high-end users. If they want to have thin machines with solid state drives and no optical drive for people who mainly consume content, that's fine -- that's what the MBA line is for.

I do not want to trade hard disk space and the optical drive for slightly more speed and battery life - that's not a good tradeoff for me. The way Apple has responded to consumers' needs in the past is to have multiple lines of products and with customizations within each line. They need to maintain that. One size does not fit all.
post #59 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

Because in a Pro portable device, I don't want something external that could be internal.

You might to rethink that statement since a floppy drive and a whole mess of other outdated HW could be internal.

Quote:
And I still use the optical drive to receive files that are too big to email from other people and to transfer files from a non-networkable standalone CD-R drive. And I also burn music for people. As cheap as USB hard drive keys are, they're not as cheap as a blank CD-R.

But how common do you thin it is for people to require burning audio CDs for people or getting files to people that don't have network connectivity? This simply isn't something the average user does which is why the iPad, with even less in the way of ports and slots is capable of being so popular.

Quote:
In addition, some people still prefer DVDs (and Blu-rays for that matter) to streaming and downloadable files. What it really comes down to is why should I lose functionality when I "upgrade" to a new machine.

Titles on Blu-ray is still the best quality but that isn't something that has ever been on the Mac... and never will be. It's a living room technology not something that needs to be carted around in your 13" notebook taking up 25% of the internal space just in case you feel the urge to watch a movie.

Have you ever heard a Blu-ray drive in action on a notebook? You should wear headphones because they can be loud, not to mention the fans going for all the heat it produces

It's just not a smart fit for the average user.

Quote:
I agree with those who wonder what the difference is going to be between a MBA and a MBP. I would also consider a small solid-state drive to be a downgrade as well. I've put a 750GB drive into my MBP and that's what I need. As a consultant, I do lots of work for clients who do not want their files in the Cloud.

The differences are clear. The current MBP took it's cues for the unibody design from the original MBA and yet people didn't wonder about the difference between the two so getting rid of the ODD and making it a little thinner isn't going to do the same.

Quote:
I think Apple is going to be making a big mistake if they don't maintain a distinction between these lines. They will lose the high-end users. If they want to have thin machines with solid state drives and no optical drive for people who mainly consume content, that's fine -- that's what the MBA line is for.

Those who think the ODD is a requirement for high-end users don't sound like Pro users to me. They sound like Pre users, as in prehistoric.

Quote:
I do not want to trade hard disk space and the optical drive for slightly more speed and battery life - that's not a good tradeoff for me.

Then don't buy a MBA.

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post #60 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by iDave View Post

With no optical drive and no hard drive, what's to distinguish the 13" Pro from the 13" Air? Just asking.

The PRO model will come with a talking assistant to anticipate what you are doing and offer to help you by popping up in the lower right hand corner of the screen. Instead of being male or female the assistant will be in the shape of a common office object. People will all want a laptop with a built-in assistant, you'll see. Once more Apple gives the public what they didn't know they badly wanted!
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post #61 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcsegenmd View Post

I suspect the MB Air moniker will disappear as will MB Pro. Don't forget Apple's obsession with simplifying the product names. One can easily envision the names
Macbook 11
Macbook 13
Macbook 15
Macbook 17
which would mean that the only decision left to the consumer is how big; seems simple to me. I'm just hoping that the MB 15 can take 16 Gb of ram, 'cause I have 4 on my 2010 and it hangs up more often than it should, especially when working with 300Mb+ files

Maybe Apple will replace the Macbook Air and Macbook Pro with the old moniker iBooks: 11, 13, 15, 17? Change the whole Mac line to iNames. Ah, probs not. Maybe though.
post #62 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

Because in a Pro portable device, I don't want something external that could be internal. And I still use the optical drive to receive files that are too big to email from other people and to transfer files from a non-networkable standalone CD-R drive. And I also burn music for people. As cheap as USB hard drive keys are, they're not as cheap as a blank CD-R.

In addition, some people still prefer DVDs (and Blu-rays for that matter) to streaming and downloadable files. What it really comes down to is why should I lose functionality when I "upgrade" to a new machine.

I agree with those who wonder what the difference is going to be between a MBA and a MBP. I would also consider a small solid-state drive to be a downgrade as well. I've put a 750GB drive into my MBP and that's what I need. As a consultant, I do lots of work for clients who do not want their files in the Cloud.

I think Apple is going to be making a big mistake if they don't maintain a distinction between these lines. They will lose the high-end users. If they want to have thin machines with solid state drives and no optical drive for people who mainly consume content, that's fine -- that's what the MBA line is for.

I do not want to trade hard disk space and the optical drive for slightly more speed and battery life - that's not a good tradeoff for me. The way Apple has responded to consumers' needs in the past is to have multiple lines of products and with customizations within each line. They need to maintain that. One size does not fit all.

Arr! Use a file-sharing site, all the other pirates, *ahem* consultants, use them.
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post #63 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

The PRO model will come with a talking assistant to anticipate what you are doing and offer to help you by popping up in the lower right hand corner of the screen. Instead of being male or female the assistant will be in the shape of a common office object. People will all want a laptop with a built-in assistant, you'll see. Once more Apple gives the public what they didn't know they badly wanted!

In case anyone didn't get the joke:
http://oddisgood.com/pages/cd-clippy.html
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post #64 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Wrong. The current 13" MBP does NOT have a discrete GPU. Check the specs.

I was being sarcastic.
post #65 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I do hope they come with available no contract unlocked cell data built in like the iPad.

I have been trying to think of reasons why they have not done so so far, one reason might be that most people keep laptops three to four years, cell modem technology changes quite a lot over such a period.
post #66 of 103
retina macbook pros (I am sure screen resolution will be much higher at least, but I dread the 16:9 on the 15"...) and glare treated imacs. Very sweet indeed! Not for the bank account, but what can you do.
post #67 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by NirvashUltimate View Post

Wouldnt it be better to have a dedicated graphics card than an integrated

Depends on what you mean by 'better'. Dedicated graphics uses more battery power and more space on the motherboard and generates more heat. OTOH, it has greater performance. Defining 'better' requires that you define the premises.

There are tradeoffs. Which tradeoff is 'best' depends on the user and what they are doing with the computer. As integrated graphics becomes more powerful, the number of people who don't need dedicated graphics is growing. No one really knows if it has grown large enough for Apple to switch entirely to integrated graphics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NirvashUltimate View Post

1. And i know this has been focused on only the 15 and 13 inch but what about the 17 inch?

It's a rumor. No one outside of Cupertino really knows. Currently, the 15" and 17" offer dedicated graphics in combination with integrated graphics. The 13" offers only integrated graphics. If I had to guess, I would expect that the 17" will continue to use dedicated graphics and probably the 15", as well.
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post #68 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Even after magnetic drives are no longer the capacity leader for the same volume (they already aren't in smaller drives) they will continue to be the cost-per-GB leader for many years to come.

If the laser based systems are perfected we could see capacity increase by at least 10X. That would put a lot more storage in a little space. It will be a very long time before we have 10 TB solid state solutions.
Quote:
I know of several people worried about these rumours of the MBP following the MBA design. I don't think it's an issue since the MBP has followed the MBA in the past and a high capacity drive is more important today for a Pro user than the ODD was a few years ago and that's still hanging around.

Apple knows this market pretty good, I don't see them giving up on magnetic drives so easily.
Quote:
The only legitimate issue are those that want the speed of the SSD and the capacity of the HDD via a dual drive system. This is less certain but I think Apple will offer this. Hopefully with a SSD card + HDD but they also have a patent for an SSD+HDD hybrid drive. I think the former is more likely.

Yes but dropping the optical makes this easy as PI. If you consider the blade type cards you could easily stuff three of them i the space of an optical drive with lots of free space all around. I'm hoping they don't go the blade route though but rather look at something far more forward looking. In any event I don't really see a hybrid solution as a big problem, it is just a matter of how Apple allocates the space freed up.
post #69 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

Because in a Pro portable device, I don't want something external that could be internal. And I still use the optical drive to receive files that are too big to email from other people and to transfer files from a non-networkable standalone CD-R drive. And I also burn music for people. As cheap as USB hard drive keys are, they're not as cheap as a blank CD-R.

In part that is my argument for getting rid of the optical. I'd much rather have a large HDD internal to the machine for bulk storage.
Quote:
In addition, some people still prefer DVDs (and Blu-rays for that matter) to streaming and downloadable files. What it really comes down to is why should I lose functionality when I "upgrade" to a new machine.

I'm sure people whined in the same manner when they had to start buying vinyl records as opposed to the wax cylinders and then those CD. Most people have moved on and now buy their audio as digital files. what it comes down to is that you either get with the times or you open an antique store.
Quote:
I agree with those who wonder what the difference is going to be between a MBA and a MBP. I would also consider a small solid-state drive to be a downgrade as well. I've put a 750GB drive into my MBP and that's what I need. As a consultant, I do lots of work for clients who do not want their files in the Cloud.

This is why everybody is so hot on the hybrid approach. You put in a 128GB drive for apps and OS usage and put your home directory on a magnetic drive. This gives you the combo of fast performance and bulk storage.
Quote:
I think Apple is going to be making a big mistake if they don't maintain a distinction between these lines. They will lose the high-end users. If they want to have thin machines with solid state drives and no optical drive for people who mainly consume content, that's fine -- that's what the MBA line is for.

I really don't know how many times we have to go over this but the optical is not a distinguishing feature of the MBP lines. Performance and capability is.
Quote:
I do not want to trade hard disk space and the optical drive for slightly more speed and battery life - that's not a good tradeoff for me. The way Apple has responded to consumers' needs in the past is to have multiple lines of products and with customizations within each line. They need to maintain that. One size does not fit all.

Again this isn't one size fits all. Rather it is a modern take on what a Pro computer needs to be. Apple will continue to keep the performance line separated from the entry level line. If they did't so many customers would leave as to sink the ship. Deletion of the optical isn't any different than the move away from the floppy.
post #70 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

It's just not a smart fit for the average user.

This is the REAL issue here. Apple is slowly pulling out of the pro market product by product to focus on the consumer and semi-pro markets.

First to go was the server products. Then they dumbed down the pro software with FCP X. Next they will probably marry the MBA and MBP together into a more mass market device (maybe not this year but certainly within the next 18 months). Next it will be the end of the Mac Pro in favour of an iMac Pro or a beefed up Mac Mini. Eventually there will be no pro products left.
post #71 of 103
I had been waiting for the right moment to replace my MBP 15 (2008). But it'll be with one of the current Macbook Pro models. I enjoy making my own audio CDs and DVD. So, yes, the optical drive is part of the pro thing.
post #72 of 103
I seriously doubt Apple will be putting dual HDDs in any portable machine. Much more likely they will offer various combinations of separate SSD and HDD drives for the new MBPs.
post #73 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amti View Post

I seriously doubt Apple will be putting dual HDDs in any portable machine. Much more likely they will offer various combinations of separate SSD and HDD drives for the new MBPs.

Like the iMac.
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #74 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hauffen View Post

So, yes, the optical drive is part of the pro thing.

You're confusing "pro" with "retro".

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #75 of 103
I am all for different opinions though I just cannot grasp the idea of still including an optical drive.

My friend and I had a bit of a debate about this and he brought up that some don't like to carry around a USB DVD drive. I said it was fair though Apple needs to move onward and not stay in neutral.

Soon optical media in general will become a thing of the past. Blu Ray players can already be picked up on the cheap and have been for quite some time. Content is all done virtually now pretty much.

Those who don't want Apple to move forward will have to be left behind and play catch-up later.
post #76 of 103
I really hope the date is wrong. It should have been in production for several weeks by now... I'm beyond anxious.
post #77 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

This is the REAL issue here. Apple is slowly pulling out of the pro market product by product to focus on the consumer and semi-pro markets.

I fail to see how the MBPs are any less of a Pro machine today than they where a year or two ago. Whatever will replace the Mac Pro will be Apples Pro solution for some time into the future. Not looking like today's Mac Pro does not make it any less of a Pro.
Quote:

First to go was the server products.

No Pro in his right mind would have been buying Apple server products in the first place. Thus sales didn't justify the engineering effort to produce the machine.
Quote:

Then they dumbed down the pro software with FCP X. Next they will probably marry the MBA and MBP together into a more mass market device (maybe not this year but certainly within the next 18 months). Next it will be the end of the Mac Pro in favour of an iMac Pro or a beefed up Mac Mini. Eventually there will be no pro products left.

Would you guys with all this negativity just stop! I mean really the Mac Pros replacement hasn't even hit the streets yet.
post #78 of 103
this is the BIG question?? what does this story mean for the next version of the 11" MBA? Not a mention of anything related to 11.
post #79 of 103
There's an article saying HP will launch Ivy Bridge laptops next week:

http://asia.cnet.com/crave/hp-to-lau...k-62214184.htm

Given that they use discrete graphics and Ivy Bridge only has a small CPU improvement, they might just revert to putting out another series of Sandy Bridge laptops as a stop-gap.

If HP do get to use Ivy Bridge then new MBPs won't be far off.
post #80 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by ciparis View Post

I really hope the date is wrong. It should have been in production for several weeks by now... I'm beyond anxious.

If the processors haven't been officially announced yet, lead time would be at most a month for the OEMs most likely. Intel is the one who delayed the processors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by malcolmkettering View Post

this is the BIG question?? what does this story mean for the next version of the 11" MBA? Not a mention of anything related to 11.

Processors that are most likely for the MBA line won't be released until June or July. Look for updates to the MBA after that
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