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Nokia warns of 'disappointing' smartphone sales in first half of 2012

post #1 of 84
Thread Starter 
Nokia on Wednesday issued a warning to investors that it was lowering its outlook for the first half of 2012 after the first quarter of the year proved "disappointing."

The Finnish handset maker had previously told investors it expected to break even on device sales during the quarter, but its operating margins proved to be around negative 3 percent. Nokia now expects its second quarter of 2012 to be similar to or below the first quarter.

"Our disappointing Devices & Services first quarter 2012 financial results and outlook for the second quarter 2012 illustrates that our Devices & Services business continues to be in the midst of transition," Stephen Elop, president and CEO of Nokia, said in a press release.

The company cited "competitive industry dynamics" as one of the chief reasons that its smartphones have struggled in the market, along with "timing, ramp-up, and consumer demand related to new products."

Nokia estimates that it sold 12 million "smart devices" in the first quarter of 2012, along with 71 million mobile phones. Its gross margins on smart device sales are estimated to have been around 16 percent.

Nokia said it sold more than 2 million of its new Windows Phone-powered Lumia handsets in the first quarter of 2012. The company said it has seen sequential growth in Lumia device activations every month since sales began in November of 2011.

"Within our Smart Devices business unit, we have established early momentum with Lumia, and we are increasing our investments in Lumia to achieve market success," Elop said. "Our operator and distributor partners are providing solid support for Windows Phone as a third ecosystem, as evidenced most recently by the launch of the Lumia 900 by AT&T in the United States."




Nokia's estimated sales of just 12 million smartphones in the quarter compare poorly to Apple, which analysts expect sold about 30 million handsets over the first three months of 2012. Apple previously reported record sales of 37 million iPhones in the holiday quarter that concluded calendar 2011.

The struggles for Nokia stem from the company's transition from its own Symbian platform to Microsoft's Windows Phone. In an internal memo issued soon after he took over Nokia, Elop referred to Symbian as a "burning platform" that Nokia needed to abandon in order to survive.

Nokia's announcement on disappointing sales comes just as the company has begun offering a $100 credit on its $99 Lumia 900 flagship smartphone, due to a software bug affecting data connections. New handsets with the issue fixes are on their way to AT&T stores, and a software update will be available for current users on April 16.

[ View article on AppleInsider ]
post #2 of 84
So, 3 million Lumia handsets to date then? Thats like a weekend launch for Apple.
post #3 of 84
That's too bad because the Lumia is the 2nd best looking handset on the market and WinPh is the 2nd best mobile OS on the market.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #4 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Nokia's announcement on disappointing sales comes just as the company has begun offering a $100 credit on its $99 Lumia 900 flagship smartphone, due to a software bug affecting data connections. New handsets with the issue fixes are on their way to AT&T stores, and a software update will be available for current users on April 16.


But I was under the impression that the smartphone beta test was over? /s
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post #5 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by GalaxyTab View Post

But I was under the impression that the smartphone beta test was over? /s

Yeah, but once you name a business unit "Our Disappointing Devices & Services", this might just not be enough...
post #6 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by GalaxyTab View Post

But I was under the impression that the smartphone beta test was over? /s

Every time I see their ads on TV I get the impression that they are referring to their past (and current) smartphones when they say beta testing.
post #7 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

So, 3 million Lumia handsets to date then? Thats like a weekend launch for Apple.

This is how Nokia celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Titanic ... poetic isn't it.
post #8 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

That's too bad because the Lumia is the 2nd best looking handset on the market and WinPh is the 2nd best mobile OS on the market.

LOL - it looks like the anodized aluminum iPod from several years ago. Very innovative!!!!
post #9 of 84
Perhaps releasing Meego - OS N9 and extending Symbian for two more versions make sense after all.

Someone in Nokia must have got a tip off that Microsoft cannot get WinP 7 ready in time, so N9 and Symbian Belle become Nokia's insurance. Should this marriage with Microsoft fell through, they would still have something to sell and keep the door open.
post #10 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

So, 3 million Lumia handsets to date then? Thats like a weekend launch for Apple.

The numbers for the Lumia were 2 million in the first quarter of 2012. Apple in fact sold OVER 4 million iPhone 4s' in its first weekend!!! MSFT is irrelevant in the mobile space and that's not about to change anytime soon. Sorry Nokia but you bet on the wrong horse. Although they paid you to race, you're stuck with a nag.
post #11 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

LOL - it looks like the anodized aluminum iPod from several years ago. Very innovative!!!!

It does bare a certain resemblance in the colored versions on the rounded sides but that's where it ends. You can say they might have been inspired by it as a starting point but there are so many unique and original aspects to it that it's a copy internally or externally.


Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

The numbers for the Lumia were 2 million in the first quarter of 2012. Apple in fact sold OVER 4 million iPhone 4s' in its first weekend!!! MSFT is irrelevant in the mobile space and that's not about to change anytime soon. Sorry Nokia but you bet on the wrong horse. Although they paid you to race, you're stuck with a nag.

As I've stated before MS can refine WinPh indefinitely until they find an in. Nokia is the one that has a limited life expectancy if they can't find a profitable revenue stream. That said, RiM is less than half that value of Nokia (which includes their huge drop in the market today).

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #12 of 84
Wow, this Microsoft/Nokia partnership is totally delivering so far. I seem to remember comments that this was a guaranteed hit - going so far as to come up with totally wacky sales numbers that basically had all Nokia users rolling over to the Windows devices instead of leaving for iOS/Android.

Of course that was coming from 'market analysts' (who are always awesome!) and Windows fanboys, but pointing out that there was no reason to think that users would hang around and jump from Symbian to Windows was too much logic, apparently. If you have to change platforms anyway, why on earth would it be assumed it would be to Windows? Just because Nokia made the hardware? Still a really f*(&&*ing strange assumption.
post #13 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

Every time I see their ads on TV I get the impression that they are referring to their past (and current) smartphones when they say beta testing.

You must be joking! Do they really air those horrid fugly adds?

No wonder they are collapsing.
post #14 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

Sorry Nokia but you bet on the wrong horse. Although they paid you to race, you're stuck with a nag.

What would have been the right horse for Nokia to bet on?
post #15 of 84
Quote: "Within our Smart Devices business unit, we have established early momentum with Lumia, and we are increasing our investments in Lumia to achieve market success," Elop said. "Our operator and distributor partners are providing solid support for Windows Phone as a third ecosystem, as evidenced most recently by the launch of the Lumia 900 by AT&T in the United States."

Now, I am wondering why a momentum going Down Hill can be such an attractive investment
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post #16 of 84
Elop isn't particularly popular in Finland right now.

From 25 million to 2 million smartphones sold per quarter. MeeGo on the N9 was getting great reviews and Elop crushed it for this. Such a sad state of affairs.
post #17 of 84
Face it where can you sight another example of one company almost single handedly wiping out most of the competitors. Apple as taken down RIM, Nokia, and HTC, they would have taken out Samsung but they copy better than Microsoft does. Motorola had issue prior to apple coming onto the horizon.

The entire industry can not seem to figure out how to compete, and they will not as long as the see themselves as cell phone company verse a consumer electronic company selling a product that meets the consumer needs not what the Service provide think is needed.
post #18 of 84
Interesting that both Nokia and RIM are falling on hard times, and yet RIM gets far more hate and piling on.
post #19 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

Face it where can you sight another example of one company almost single handedly wiping out most of the competitors. Apple as taken down RIM, Nokia, and HTC, they would have taken out Samsung but they copy better than Microsoft does. Motorola had issue prior to apple coming onto the horizon.

The entire industry can not seem to figure out how to compete, and they will not as long as the see themselves as cell phone company verse a consumer electronic company selling a product that meets the consumer needs not what the Service provide think is needed.

There is a lot right about this, but we should not ignore that Nokia was still outselling Apple in smartphones, and overall profitable when Elop came in. The N9 was maybe the most-praised version one mobile phone since the original iPhone, but Elop ordered to only sell it in markets that are (on a global scale) largely irrelevant to maintain his cozy position: ankle-deep and head-first in Ballmer's behind.
post #20 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

Interesting that both Nokia and RIM are falling on hard times, and yet RIM gets far more hate and piling on.

Do you have an argument to back up that claim? This thread is pooh poohing Nokia quite a bit but I see no pooh poohing of RiM.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #21 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Elop isn't particularly popular in Finland right now.

From 25 million to 2 million smartphones sold per quarter. MeeGo on the N9 was getting great reviews and Elop crushed it for this. Such a sad state of affairs.

Not completely. I say some of Nokia men went behind Elop's back and now N9 is available in most GSM country that Nokia sell their own handsets without subsidiary. And yes, it won glowing reviews in those places.

When App store takes a back seat, be it content issues, dodgy credit card system, or lacks of established online payment, where phones have to fight mostly with what comes out of the box, Nokia holds firm. Perhaps like Samsung in China, if Apple cannot dislodge Samsung out of Mainland China and Nokia from India, they will come back and bite Apple later.

So if iPhone is a BMW, Nokia could be our Toyota Land Cruiser; roam free where iPhone cannot follow.

And for RichL, if iPhone is like your BMW 3-Series, would you call Samsung Galaxy a Ford Mondeo? Both are common, practical and available in almost any shape, size and price range.
post #22 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

There is a lot right about this, but we should not ignore that Nokia was still outselling Apple in smartphones, and overall profitable when Elop came in. The N9 was maybe the most-praised version one mobile phone since the original iPhone, but Elop ordered to only sell it in markets that are (on a global scale) largely irrelevant to maintain his cozy position: ankle-deep and head-first in Ballmer's behind.

1) There was a clear trend before Elop took teh helm that the Nokia ship was sinking so implying that it's sinking because of Elop is a fallacy.

2) If you want to argue that it's sinking faster because of the fat trimming Elop issued then you'd have to show that they canned profitable ares of their business. I don't think that is possible.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #23 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

What would have been the right horse for Nokia to bet on?

their best bet would have been to buy time with some Android devices, at least people buy them. All the while, revamp Symbian into something shiny so they can be innovative rather than just another clone maker like they are with Microsoft Windows Phone.
post #24 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

LOL - it looks like the anodized aluminum iPod from several years ago. Very innovative!!!!

color is exactly the same as the blue 4th gen iPod nano.
post #25 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) There was a clear trend before Elop took teh helm that the Nokia ship was sinking so implying that it's sinking because of Elop is a fallacy.

2) If you want to argue that it's sinking faster because of the fat trimming Elop issued then you'd have to show that they canned profitable ares of their business. I don't think that is possible.

1) When Elop came, Nokia was still having increasing sales numbers (as the market was growing, they were only losing share, which was only natural, as their share was enormous and only due to a complete lack of competition before Apple appeared), only now they are really going down. Nokia was still making profits while feeding thousands more employees than today.

2) Palm and RIM have shown that you can develop an acceptable GUI within a year. If Nokia had invested a fraction of what they are losing now into stopping that Open Source Symbian madness and getting actual professionals to do it, they would be in a much better position today. Symbian had the most efficient baseband of any mobile OS, and Nokia had to pay nobody to use it. MeeGo was, out of the door, more feature complete than WP7 is today. The Ovi Store was only second to Apple. Nobody had more billing agreements for online purchases with carriers than Nokia, now carriers shun them, because they are in bed with the arch-enemy Skype.

Globally, now 92% of former Nokia smartphone users renewing their contracts choose a non-Nokia phone. That is the worst retention rate I have ever heard of, maybe the worst of any global company ever.

When you release a do-or-die product (the Lumia 800) in your home market (Europe) and MS has to give away free Xboxes to even achieve 2% market share... you are done and you did bet on the wrong Trojan horse. People do not carry millions of iOS and Android devices into the office because they love Windows. No need to proof anything here, it's glaringly obvious.
post #26 of 84
FWIW - I am going to ASSUME you guys are more than just fanboys... because none of the comments REALLY speak to how good/great the Nokia Lumia 800 and 900 phones actually are.

I've been using the iPhone since 2007, and gone through the last 3 iterations of it.
And to me... it's time Apple stop just rolling out a better camera, or video, or memory...

Dear Apple, how about a REALLY significant OS?


My point it, success, to me, is keeping Apple BACK from innovating.
I mean heck, when you sell THE BEST SELLING phone, what is there to motivate you to REALLY make it better?

The reason why people were SO disappointed with the 4s... it was an incremental upgrade at best from the 4. You can argue better camera or video or processor... but to users like me... was it worth the $199+ upgrade from a phone I bought 2 years ago that does essentially the same thing still?
If you disagree, then why does Apple tout Siri so much? Gimmick.

If anything you guys, you need to think bigger picture...
Microsoft and Nokia are rolling out a serious paradigm shift in mobile UI with live tile functions, not just more "widgets"...

A successful Nokia/Microsoft phone means Apple/Android developers will think "different" about their approach to phone OS/apps...

And not just keep riding the success wave... to mediocrity.
post #27 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

1) When Elop came, Nokia was still having increasing sales numbers (as the market was growing, they were only losing share, which was only natural, as their share was enormous and only due to a complete lack of competition before Apple appeared), only now they are really going down. Nokia was still making profits while feeding thousands more employees than today.

2) Palm and RIM have shown that you can develop an acceptable GUI within a year. If Nokia had invested a fraction of what they are losing now into stopping that Open Source Symbian madness and getting actual professionals to do it, they would be in a much better position today. Symbian had the most efficient baseband of any mobile OS, and Nokia had to pay nobody to use it. MeeGo was, out of the door, more feature complete than WP7 is today. The Ovi Store was only second to Apple. Nobody had more billing agreements for online purchases with carriers than Nokia, now carriers shun them, because they are in bed with the arch-enemy Skype.

Globally, now 92% of former Nokia smartphone users renewing their contracts choose a non-Nokia phone. That is the worst retention rate I have ever heard of, maybe the worst of any global company ever.

When you release a do-or-die product (the Lumia 800) in your home market (Europe) and MS has to give away free Xboxes to even achieve 2% market share... you are done and you did bet on the wrong Trojan horse. People do not carry millions of iOS and Android devices into the office because they love Windows. No need to proof anything here, it's glaringly obvious.

There is just so much wrong with your comments that I'll just address one part with a deadly blow.


Nokia quarterly profits drop 40 percent year-on-year

That's CEO Olli-Pekka Kallasvuo at the helm, almost a year before Elop signed on.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #28 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

There is just so much wrong with your comments that I'll just address one part with a deadly blow.


Nokia quarterly profits drop 40 percent year-on-year

That's CEO Olli-Pekka Kallasvuo at the helm, almost a year before Elop signed on.

Where is the deadly blow here? You just confirmed what I said: They were still profitable. Now they are predicting 6 months of significant losses in a row, and no plan how to improve after these 6 months in sight. They have traded a lacking platform for no platform.
post #29 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

1) <...>

2) Palm and RIM have shown that you can develop an acceptable GUI within a year. If Nokia had invested a fraction of what they are losing now into stopping that Open Source Symbian madness and getting actual professionals to do it, they would be in a much better position today. Symbian had the most efficient baseband of any mobile OS, and Nokia had to pay nobody to use it. MeeGo was, out of the door, more feature complete than WP7 is today. The Ovi Store was only second to Apple. Nobody had more billing agreements for online purchases with carriers than Nokia, now carriers shun them, because they are in bed with the arch-enemy Skype.


<...>.

Indeed. It was a major mistake to reproduce the PC model, where, as it was said "one third of the profit goes to the chipmaker, and the other to Microsoft". Furthermore, mobile devices are such highly integrated equipments, that Apple's hardware&software integrated model is the only viable, as it enables the best hardware/software design choices trade-offs.
post #30 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

Where is the deadly blow here? You just confirmed what I said: They were still profitable. Now they are predicting 6 months of significant losses in a row, and no plan how to improve after these 6 months in sight. They have traded a lacking platform for no platform.

Forgive Solip. His brain has something fell of and never come back right since he had that chemotherapy. The same way Daniel Dilger is never himself again after the concussion from that motorcycle accident.

Hence X prefix. He is not who he was.
post #31 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuxoM3 View Post

FWIW - I am going to ASSUME you guys are more than just fanboys... because none of the comments REALLY speak to how good/great the Nokia Lumia 800 and 900 phones actually are.

I've been using the iPhone since 2007, and gone through the last 3 iterations of it.
And to me... it's time Apple stop just rolling out a better camera, or video, or memory...

Dear Apple, how about a REALLY significant OS?


My point it, success, to me, is keeping Apple BACK from innovating.
I mean heck, when you sell THE BEST SELLING phone, what is there to motivate you to REALLY make it better?

The reason why people were SO disappointed with the 4s... it was an incremental upgrade at best from the 4. You can argue better camera or video or processor... but to users like me... was it worth the $199+ upgrade from a phone I bought 2 years ago that does essentially the same thing still?
If you disagree, then why does Apple tout Siri so much? Gimmick.

If anything you guys, you need to think bigger picture...
Microsoft and Nokia are rolling out a serious paradigm shift in mobile UI with live tile functions, not just more "widgets"...

A successful Nokia/Microsoft phone means Apple/Android developers will think "different" about their approach to phone OS/apps...

And not just keep riding the success wave... to mediocrity.

Sure. Apple's evil because they haven't found a way to install a fusion generator into the iPhone to provide free energy for all of your appliances. Or maybe they should build in a transporter. :roll eyes:

What does it take to consider something a "really significant OS"? Isn't it enough that they've revolutionized the phone and now the tablet markets and the rest of the world is playing catch-up?

Apple is not going to promote change for the sake of change. If there's a better paradigm, I'm sure they'd consider it, but so far, no one has come up with one.
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post #32 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

Where is the deadly blow here? You just confirmed what I said: They were still profitable. Now they are predicting 6 months of significant losses in a row, and no plan how to improve after these 6 months in sight. They have traded a lacking platform for no platform.

And the Titanic was mostly above the water when people were jumping ship.

So where is your prof that Elop is the one that sank Nokia?

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #33 of 84
The problem is there just isn't room for another smartphone OS. It wouldn't matter if WP blew the others out of the water - it would still be the largely irrelevant outsider. The other problem is WP is far from blowing anything out of the water - most reviewers think it's decent enough but in no way has significant advantages over either iOS or Android.

Sorry the colored tiles don't do anything for me. Maybe some find them pretty - but I think it's a minority program. And I outright *hate* the text based parts. That's ugly and inefficient - just a bad UI. Props for not ripping off iOS but... that's not gonna work.

Why is there no room for another platform? Look no further than Windows and Mac. The Mac was always a niche product. In some ways people feel safer getting what everyone else is getting. They may not think about platform strategy but they know if they get what everyone has, they can't really go wrong. The difference is, the Mac was clearly superior to Windows for almost all of the last 30 years. And it still only ever got to 5%. What chance does WP have, being on par at best with the others?

The irony is Nokia today could be Samsung. They could be battling it out with Samsung for the title of best Android handset maker (while hedging their bets with Meegoo and even WP). I'd trust Nokia to make a way better skin than anyone else. And Nokia can make hardware - in quantity, ship it, with excellent design and excellent quality.

Nokia's downfall was pride, plain and simple. They thought they could do better than Android, and fell way short. Windows Phone is that one, last "bold" and also "utterly stupid" move....
post #34 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

And the Titanic was mostly above the water when people were jumping ship.

So where is your prof that Elop is the one that sank Nokia?

Elop was part of the MS deal that's currently destroying Nokia. He's a Microsoft man. Not sure you can say he sunk the ship, he just drilled another few holes in the hull.
post #35 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


<...>

Nokia estimates that it sold 12 million "smart devices" in the first quarter of 2012, along with 71 million mobile phones. Its gross margins on smart device sales are estimated to have been around 16 percent.

Nokia said it sold more than 2 million of its new Windows Phone-powered Lumia handsets in the first quarter of 2012.

<...>

[ View article on AppleInsider ][/URL]

How many different models to reach those figures ? This reminds me a personal experience, back to the time I was a consultant. My customer was a (large) company, present at that time in the mobile phones business (it is no longer). The executive guy representing my customer had been put under pressure to achieve the impossible goal of shrinking development schedules to a just few months, the basic reasoning behind this being that coming as early as possible on the market with a continuous flow of new models was the key to success.

That goal was not only impossible to achieve, but also a wrong one, as Apple demonstrated it.

This is where really good managers distinguish themselves from bad ones : setting the right goals, having the right perspective and vision ...
post #36 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairthrope View Post

Forgive Solip. His brain has something fell of and never come back right since he had that chemotherapy. The same way Daniel Dilger is never himself again after the concussion from that motorcycle accident.

Hence X prefix. He is not who he was.

That's an interesting personal attack. Care to elaborate on my supposed chemotherapy or is this just some negative slant you have against those with cancer?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #37 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by orthorim View Post

Elop was part of the MS deal that's currently destroying Nokia. He's a Microsoft man. Not sure you can say he sunk the ship, he just drilled another few holes in the hull.

And Nokia would have been fine using Symbian or Meego or buying or building yet another OS?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #38 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullhead View Post

their best bet would have been to buy time with some Android devices, at least people buy them. All the while, revamp Symbian into something shiny so they can be innovative rather than just another clone maker like they are with Microsoft Windows Phone.

Obviously (in hindsight) they should have done Android. I guess the "development culture" (translation: old people) in the Symbian department resisted. Nokia's downfall was a failure of management to understand software. They believed Symbian would be able to compete, that Symbian would not only be on par with but better than Android.

Which is surprising - the code smell was really strong on that one even when just black box testing. Symbian was broken for years and years... Symbian might have been the reason Apple entered the phone market. They saw that smartphones sucked, and made something better.

I had a Nokia N73. It was bad - the web browser pretty much didn't work at all. Neither did maps. It was an ugly mess of marketing promises wrapped around a dumb phone.

So I sold the N73 and got a Sony Ericsson P990i. And then I learned how bad Symbian can be. The P990i was the worst POS phone I've ever had. Nothing worked. Figuring out basic functionality required consulting the handbook. It looked cool but it was truly horrific.
post #39 of 84
Wait, did they announce their lineup of phones was disappointing or the sales of said phones were disappointing?
post #40 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

[...] Nokia's announcement on disappointing sales comes just as the company has begun offering a $100 credit on its $99 Lumia 900 flagship smartphone, due to a software bug affecting data connections. [...]

And why is it necessary to replace said phones instead of simply issuing a software and/or firmware update?

Could it be, I dunno, because Microsoft just doesn't have the infrastructure in place?

Microsoft strikes again. They've turned the Lumia 900 into the Blue Phone Of Death.

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