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Inside the new iPad's 4G LTE mobile data: AT&T vs Verizon

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
Apple's newest iPad sports very fast 4G LTE data service, available on either AT&T or Verizon Wireless in the US. Here's how the two carriers stack up as LTE providers.

Similar to our iPhone 4S testing across the data networks of AT&T, Sprint and Verizon this winter, we performed a new series of tests on both the AT&T and Verizon models of the new iPad.

We didn't test the strength of radio connectivity between iPad and cellular towers, which is reflected in the "bars" of service reported by the device. Instead, we measured actual data throughput, providing a better indication of how well it will actually work on each carrier when you look up maps, browse the web or download or upload email.

Introducing 4G LTE

The new iPad is Apple's first device designed to connect to LTE networks, also referred to as "4G" to distinguish it from existing 3G technologies including Verizon's CDMA EV-DO and the 3GPP UMTS technology used by AT&T in the US.

The first generation of mobile networks were essentially voice-only analog (AMPS in the US), followed by a second generation of digital networks (CDMAOne and GSM) with rudimentary data features.

The 3G networks launched over the past decade initially began making it feasible to transmit data fast enough to comfortably support tasks such as web browsing. However, the exact definition of 3G or 4G is interpreted broadly enough to nearly be meaningless.

Up until late 2010, 4G was supposed to mean blazing fast 100Mbps data service using new carrier technologies and IP networking, just like computer networks and wireless WiFi.




Mobile carriers, however, wanted a new feature to sell smartphones, and pushed for "4G" to cover the significantly improved technologies they were in the process of building out. The ITU standards body relented and redefined "4G" to cover both the limited version of 4G LTE then being fleshed out as well as a variety of similar "3G+" standards, including HSPA+, which also delivered data service well in excess of the speeds commonly associated with 3G.




Verizon's leap from CDMA EV-DO to LTE

Verizon was the first national US carrier to implement LTE service, largely because it had the slowest 3G data network with no realistic potential to upgrade it. Qualcomm, which had developed the 2G CDMAOne and 3G CDMA EV-DO carrier technologies Verizon has historically used, had abandoned plans to build its own 4G replacement.

Instead, the chasm between Qualcomm's CDMA networks and the incompatible but more widely used GSM/UMTS technologies created by the 3GPP standards body was bridged by technology sharing that implemented carrier technologies originally developed by Qualcomm and improvements made by other technology companies.

The resulting 3GPP roadmap for GSM/UMTS standards outlined a series of steps that carriers could implement to bring significant, incremental improvements to their networks, working toward a 4G future. However, for legacy CDMA carriers such as Verizon, moving toward 3GPP standards would require a larger jump.

Internationally, other CDMA carriers have either bolted on UMTS/HSPA or LTE "overlays" that augmented their existing CDMA EV-DO service.

Outside of AT&T and Verizon in the US, Sprint hoped to beat its competitors to the market with competing WIMAX service, but has since announced plans to move toward LTE. T-Mobile has invested in HSPA+ upgrades but had no LTE rollout plans; it expected to be acquired by AT&T last year, and serve as an accelerant to help roll out that company's LTE strategy up until the government got involved and forced the transaction into failure.

Verizon's LTE performance

In our testing, Verizon's LTE network can be spectacularly fast, regularly reaching an astounding 40Mbps for downloads and up to 19Mbps for uploads. In the US, that's significantly faster than typical fast cable broadband speeds. But Verizon's LTE isn't always that fast. About ten percent of the time, LTE areas only delivered an AT&T 3G-esque 1.9Mbps to 2.7Mbps down, even while delivering (oddly enough) fast 10-14Mbps uploads. Occasionally, despite showing bars of LTE, we got poor service speeds.

In about a quarter of our tests, Verizon's LTE delivered what we'd describe as "Advanced 3G/4G" speeds between 5-10Mbps. However, most of the time, represented in 65 percent of our tests, Verizon's LTE delivered greater than 10Mbps download speeds, up to 40Mbps. These are typical WiFi speeds, very impressive for a mobile device. About 18.8 percent of the time, we got better than 20Mbps downloads on Verizon's LTE.

Despite usually delivering fast downloads, Verizon's LTE uploads were more of a mixed bag, ranging from an occasional slow 1Mbps rate to upload speeds between 3-9Mpbs about half of the time. And factoring in non-LTE service holes, we experienced slower than 5Mbps service around 37.7 percent of the time.

The biggest disappointment to Verizon users will be that as soon as you lose LTE service (which is only available in limited areas), data rates fall back into CDMA EV-DO territory, with a relatively plodding 0.1-1.3Mbps data rate for both uploads and downloads. That's the same you get from current Verizon iPhone models, and again is why Verizon worked the hardest to get LTE deployed first.

AT&T, LTE & 4G

In contrast to Verizon's big jump to LTE, existing GSM providers such as AT&T and T-Mobile have had the ability to incrementally improve their existing networks. While Verizon decided to jump to LTE directly, AT&T has added both incremental HSPA+ upgrades and has recently began building LTE as well in parallel, albeit being behind Verizon's LTE deployment.

AT&T, like T-Mobile, has also rebranded its HSPA+ service as "4G" in order to associate it with the faster data service of LTE. Both have the potential of reaching around 10-40Mbps, in excess of ten times faster than typical 1-1.5Mbps 3G EV-DO service. In our tests, AT&T's non-LTE "4G" service delivered a respectable 1.5 to 8Mbps, far above typical 3G but below the 9-40Mbps rates of AT&T's LTE.

The proportional breakdown of AT&T's mixed 4G and LTE service was nearly identical to Verizon's LTE: about ten percent of the time, AT&T's 4G areas delivered1.7Mbps to 2.5Mbps downloads, although uploads on those "4G" networks were much slower, effectively 3G speeds of 1-1.5Mbps. Across the board, AT&T fell below our baseline of 5Mbps 26.6 percent of the time, significantly less often than with Verizon.

In about a quarter of our tests, AT&T's 4G or LTE delivered those "Advanced 3G/4G" speeds between 5-10Mbps. However, most of the time, represented in 63 percent of our tests, AT&T's LTE delivered greater than 10Mbps down, up to the same 40Mbps hit by Verizon. When indicating LTE rather than 4G, AT&T's upload rates were also consistently faster than Verizon's, in the 10Mbps and up category. AT&T also reached above 20Mbps in 40 percent of our tests, nearly twice as often as Verizon.




AT&T vs Verizon in 4G & LTE

The bottom line: both AT&T and Verizon deliver very fast LTE downloads. In our tests, AT&T seemed to provide more consistent LTE upload speeds. Uploads matter if you're doing more than just browsing the web or downloading apps and movies. If you plan to do things like capture videos and email them to friends, you'll want the kind of upload speeds AT&T performed better at delivering consistently.

If you're located well within the currently quite limited LTE service areas of AT&T and Verizon, you'll enjoy really fast data speeds on either network. Unlike our previous testing of AT&T's early 3G network beginning in 2008, we found that even when the new iPad indicates a poor signal with just one or two bars, we were still able to download at very fast speeds (below). However, in many cases our Verizon model would indicate more bars, but deliver significantly slower LTE data service. It's possible Verizon's LTE network is handling more traffic, because its also newer than AT&T's, so this may change as AT&T signs up more LTE users.




If you plan to use your new iPad outside of areas covered by LTE, you'll have a different experience depending on the carrier you choose. While Verizon offers broader LTE service coverage spots, as soon as you leave the coverage area you're instantly back in 3G land, and slow EV-DO 3G (less than 1Mbps) at that.

If you break out AT&T's faster, more modern HSPA+ networks, which can deliver the same WiFi-like mobile speeds as LTE, the comparison between AT&T and Verizon's available "4G" networks tilt in favor of AT&T, as presented in the service maps of the Coverage app.

The first graphic below shows AT&T's (in blue) and Verizon's (in red) LTE network maps. The graphic below it adds all "4G" networks, allowing AT&T to get credit for its similarly performing, modern mobile networks.




With AT&T, as you leave LTE service areas you first get "4G," which ranges from very fast download speeds that feel like 4G (in that 5-10Mbps range) to service that feels more like very good 3G (1.5-5Mbps) down to the very rural speeds (less than 1Mbps) you'll find as you leave civilization.




However, while AT&T offered consistently faster LTE uploads than Verizon, when you enter "4G" on AT&T your downloads rapidly degrade to less than 1.5Mbps, which is hard to call 4G with a straight face.

In real world testing that involved reloading a long series of identical images in Mail, we found that despite slight differences in data throughput on each network, the effective and apparent speed of actual tasks seemed consistently identical when both models were operated in LTE service areas.

LTE drawbacks

While LTE is indeed very fast, it is not without its downsides. Apple seems to have solved the biggest issue with 4G on the new iPad: the idea that you can't have both LTE and battery life. The new iPad packs a huge battery and modern LTE chipsets that make its use very efficient, to the point where it wasn't an obvious battery hog.

The next big issue for LTE is that, while it's fast, carriers are not giving you any more data to run through. It's not a fire hose of data. It's more like a squirt gun: it shoots out data fast, but you also drain your tank quickly and have to refill at significant cost once you plough through your 2GB or so of data. If carriers really want to see adoption of LTE, they need to stop being so greedy about data limits. Offering ten times faster data at the same data limit is absurd.

AT&T is advertising its LTE service with spots that suggest people are greatly benefitted by getting Facebook updates and emails seconds before their peers. This is simply not true. LTE's biggest advantage will be when it allows you to inhale movies and download large apps and documents. You don't need faster data to get quick text updates. This is just stupid.

Verizon on the other hand has simply resurrected to its "we're bigger than AT&T" ad campaign, insisting that it has significantly more LTE service than its competitor. While that's technically true, AT&T has significantly more 4G service, and our tests show AT&T's LTE network seems to perform better on uploads (although its non-LTE 4G network does not).

Is it true that Verizon's 2-10Mbps LTE is really better than AT&T's 2-10Mbps 4G? No. So it's hard to see much honesty in such a simplistic comparison between the LTE coverage maps of Verizon and AT&T, particularly if you ignore AT&T's superior middle ground 4G service. Both networks have strengths and weaknesses that can't be boiled down into a best performer.

In fact, unless you plan to use your new iPad as a hot spot to serve fast (but limited data capacity) LTE service to your laptop and other devices (something only Verizon currently supports), it's hard to see a clear leader between the Verizon and AT&T models. Both are so constrained by their data plan limits that you might just be better off buying the WiFi model and saving the premium to help pay for a tethered data plan on your phone.

LTE outside North America

Apple currently only has agreements in place for LTE-equipped iPads on Verizon and AT&T, along with some Canadian carriers. European and Australian flavors of LTE aren't compatible with these new iPad versions.

Unfortunately, while the top three US carriers and most other significant carriers worldwide have settled upon LTE as the their common technology for future mobile networking, each carrier is using its own frequency bands, complicating the potential for using one device across different networks.

The upside is that Apple has also packed quad-band support for alternative 4G technologies into the new iPad, which should work on most international UMTS/HSPA+ providers, including those that support the very fast DC-HSDPA specification. These technologies can deliver the same top speeds up around 40Mbps we found with LTE providers in the US.

For a full overall evaluation of the new iPad, see our In-depth review: Apple's third generation iPad and iOS 5.1

[ View article on AppleInsider ]
post #2 of 42
1) Why does AI insist on using on old and inaccurate images. That first one was designed for the iPhone 4 back in 2010.

2) The results for SF are interesting because most results I've seen have Verizon beating out AT&T is speed tests, and by a wide margin.

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post #3 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Why does AI insist on using on old and inaccurate images. That first one was designed for the iPhone 4 back in 2010.

What about the inaccurate information. ATT is NOT LTE. It is 4G (by the loose definition) which is not the same as LTE.

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post #4 of 42
I recently moved to Minneapolis and was a happy ATT subscriber until I got up here and my iPhone drops calls all the time.

Ordered the ATT iPad 3 and it didn't work well at all, very slow speeds. Returned it and purchased the Verizon model and was blown away by the better signal and speeds.

ATT will probably lose me as a customer come new iPhone time.
post #5 of 42
I live in the DFW area (Fort Worth, TX) to be exact -- AT&T has a very good 4G LTE network in this area and the coverage is excellent. I have the AT&T 4G iPad and I couldn't be happier...the speeds are incredible, it is very, very fast and works flawlessly. I really think it all depends on which carrier provides the better network coverage where you live. AT&T has not established it's 4G LTE networks everywhere yet, and Verizon has greater area coverage, but if you are in a metro area covered by AT&T, the AT&T network is a better, faster network. You just have to make sure the coverage is good where you live, mostly in a few large cities in the US at the moment. I believe AT&T has 4G LTE in Houston, New York, Chicago, and San Francisco as well (as well as a few others). They are expanding the networks each month.
post #6 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

What about the inaccurate information. ATT is NOT LTE. It is 4G (by the loose definition) which is not the same as LTE.

The whole point is that AT&T now DOES have real LTE in some markets. The test confirmed that. They don't have the FauxG DC-HSDPA but real LTE. The "4G" is the top end of their old 3G network - HSPA+.

They don't have as much geographic coverage with pure LTE but the point was that Verizon's LTE comes in different flavors too, some of which are about the same as AT&T "4G"
post #7 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundvision View Post

I recently moved to Minneapolis and was a happy ATT subscriber until I got up here and my iPhone drops calls all the time.

Ordered the ATT iPad 3 and it didn't work well at all, very slow speeds. Returned it and purchased the Verizon model and was blown away by the better signal and speeds.

ATT will probably lose me as a customer come new iPhone time.

Right on!!! I did the same. And they have lost me as an iPhone customer, too.
post #8 of 42
Hang on, I'm confused as an Australian I've been told the new iPad doesn't have 4G, now you're telling me it does???
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post #9 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Hang on, I'm confused as an Australian I've been told the new iPad doesn't have 4G, now you're telling me it does???

It doesn't support LTE 4g, but it does support HSPA+ in Australia, which some would call 4g and the ITU has changed their position to consider it 4g as well. The original 4g specification, now being called LTE Advanced, required at least 100mbps download speeds, which no carrier has.
post #10 of 42
you can only achieve those 20-40+Mb/sec transfer rates with true LTE, the faux "4G" pr HSDPA+ really is not true LTE. If you are in the USA in a large metro area and LTE is supported, you might be able to get those speeds which could be even faster than a standard cable modem. My iPad does feel as fast as my cable modem at home when I am connected to 4G LTE.
post #11 of 42
AT&T is just as stupid about advertising LTE as they are about advertising simultaneous voice and data: they show people pretending NOT to be online while on a call, which is contrived and silly. The value of simultaneous data is being online as PART of the conversation. Looking up movie times, restaurant hours, or answering a question.
post #12 of 42
Those who follow Apple forums know the adage about the wisdom of "skating to where the puck is going to be, not where it is" well.

Yet for all the detail, the article offered little in the way of useful projections about what the LTE situation is likely to be even 1 or 2 let alone 5 years from now. And I'm talking about build-out and technology not pricing - as that's clearly more impenetrable. But I was under the impression that Verizon not only has more LTE installed, they're also installing more of it at a faster pace.

Anyway, the more I read, the less I feel I know about which behemoth to cast my lot with.....

...and unless something convincing pops up otherwise, I'll probably go with Verizon because they have full LTE coverage in the places I spend 90% of my time.

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post #13 of 42
Here in East Texas, LTE rocks:





Goodbye AT&T.
post #14 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Postulant View Post

Here in East Texas, LTE rocks:





Goodbye AT&T.

Ahem. I have AT&T and their LTE is nothing short of great. And I am in Fort Worth. I would take AT&T over Verizon anyday.
post #15 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by WardC View Post

Ahem. I have AT&T and their LTE is nothing short of great. And I am in Fort Worth. I would take AT&T over Verizon anyday.

I might like AT&T too if they had LTE here, if they offered the hotspot feature, and if I didn't drop so many calls. It's been a nice run(5 iPhones and 2 iPads) but I'm giving AT&T the boot.
post #16 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Hang on, I'm confused as an Australian I've been told the new iPad doesn't have 4G, now you're telling me it does???

Sure it does but the 4G module is put in upright for the northern hemi. For you to use it, it must be flipped over. Sorry mate.
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post #17 of 42
Does anyone know the URL to the Google coverage map that AI posted above? I looked around but couldn't seem to find it.
post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

Those who follow Apple forums know the adage about the wisdom of "skating to where the puck is going to be, not where it is" well.

Yet for all the detail, the article offered little in the way of useful projections about what the LTE situation is likely to be even 1 or 2 let alone 5 years from now. And I'm talking about build-out and technology not pricing - as that's clearly more impenetrable. But I was under the impression that Verizon not only has more LTE installed, they're also installing more of it at a faster pace.

Anyway, the more I read, the less I feel I know about which behemoth to cast my lot with.....

You're right, this article didn't do much with providing guidance. Here's what I do know.

The hardest thing any carrier can do is get permission for a new cell tower. Once they've gotten past the ecology barriers, the zoning barriers and wild-eyed hordes with pitch forks, the carrier still has to finally build the tower and bring in the land lines. This process usually takes years.

So, the quickest improvements will come from the company with the most towers in existence within a given area. The bigger carriers have the money to spend on upgrades, but that might not happen for a while in any given area. Your area might not be the one that needing improved traffic for a couple more years, so by accident the competing carrier may be upgrading in your area before the one you are with. This is about as much information you can count on, anything more is speculation.
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post #19 of 42
56.3/19.98 Mbps At&T LTE NYC
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post #20 of 42
Comparing LTE speeds on both networks is kind of a waste of time. It's the same tech, both are running fiber, an empty tower is going to give you the same results back. On the flip side, Verizon, courtesy of being a full year ahead has about 5x the LTE connected devices load AT&T does. Naturally as of today, you'd expect to see it pull a little ahead. So really it comes down to coverage, and that answer clearly shows for itself.
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post #21 of 42
Too bad there are different LTE bands across the world. That's a lot of specific models Apple needs to make.
post #22 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post

Too bad there are different LTE bands across the world. That's a lot of specific models Apple needs to make.

There are 43 operating bands listed, although only about half seem to be occupied, though many are probably not active. At any rate it's a lot more than the 4 UMTS "3G" operating bands used by the iPhone around the world.

I've asked and researched how many LTE operating bands the MDM9615 can support at once and have came up with no answer. I assume it's at least 2 because the MDM9600 can support 2 but that's as far as I can feasibly speculate.

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post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

Those who follow Apple forums know the adage about the wisdom of "skating to where the puck is going to be, not where it is" well.

Yet for all the detail, the article offered little in the way of useful projections about what the LTE situation is likely to be even 1 or 2 let alone 5 years from now. And I'm talking about build-out and technology not pricing - as that's clearly more impenetrable. But I was under the impression that Verizon not only has more LTE installed, they're also installing more of it at a faster pace.

Anyway, the more I read, the less I feel I know about which behemoth to cast my lot with.....

...and unless something convincing pops up otherwise, I'll probably go with Verizon because they have full LTE coverage in the places I spend 90% of my time.

To realize that the major overall point of the article is that both AT&T and VZW have wi range between data speeds and neither can be called better than the other since they both have severe limitations in one way or the other and BOTH render the whole 4G bandwagon (regardless of LTE or "we call it 4G") useless within the first few days of a billing cycle due to ridiculous data caps.....

I mean who really gives a shit that you can download movies at 40mbps when your data cap is already exceeded after downloading ONE movie or a handful of HD YouTube videos??????
post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlosViscarra View Post

I mean who really gives a shit that you can download movies at 40mbps when your data cap is already exceeded after downloading ONE movie or a handful of HD YouTube videos??????

Also, I don't have mine yet, but I've heard that on some devices/apps/sites (I forget who senses and does exactly what with what info on which devices), your connection type/speed is noted and sites that offer multiple versions of media (as YouTube often does) will automatically send you higher res versions if your device is on 4G rather than 3G, thus chewing through your data plan even faster unless you realize it, don't want/need that version and specifically take action otherwise...

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post #25 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

Also, I don't have mine yet, but I've heard that on some devices/apps/sites (I forget who senses and does exactly what with what info on which devices), your connection type/speed is noted and sites that offer multiple versions of media (as YouTube often does) will automatically send you higher res versions if your device is on 4G rather than 3G, thus chewing through your data plan even faster unless you realize it, don't want/need that version and specifically take action otherwise...

Netflix, for example, throttles their streaming according to your bandwidth. Apps and web clients that use this technique need to begin offering "throttle" buttons, else risk losing traffic due to onerous indirect user costs.

AT&T has proposed that content deliverers might subsidize data usage.

<random googled article>
http://pocketnow.com/smartphone-news...or-subscribers

But what's that going to do to the consumer? Will app prices go up? Can web clients play ball? How will this affect their business models? If we aren't paying AT&T, who will want our money instead? Will developers now be expected to pay for finite perishable resources similar to the current state of insulting consumer-oriented data plans? We're already getting fleeced, and now they want to fleece businesses too.

Frankly, I think that this is going to cause a lot of problems.
post #26 of 42
Lots of people in the Apple forums are having problems with 4G dropping or not connecting at all. Quite many have much better luck just turning LTE off completely. Seems in areas of weak coverage the iPad has problems. This is in addition to all of us outside the US who can't get 3G to work without a reboot and those having WiFi problems.

And still no comment from Apple.
post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

ATT is NOT LTE.

This statement is factually invalid. AT&T does offer LTE.

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post #28 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by jodyfanning View Post

Lots of people in the Apple forums are having problems with 4G dropping or not connecting at all. Quite many have much better luck just turning LTE off completely. Seems in areas of weak coverage the iPad has problems. This is in addition to all of us outside the US who can't get 3G to work without a reboot and those having WiFi problems.

And still no comment from Apple.

I've heard of this, but I have not experienced it.

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post #29 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. X View Post

Does anyone know the URL to the Google coverage map that AI posted above? I looked around but couldn't seem to find it.

Those maps are screenshots from our app 'Coverage?' - which is as far as I know the only way to actually overlay and directly compare coverage maps from the various carriers.

We also have two more limited and less frequently updated free versions in the app store: '4G Finder' and 'LTE Finder'.

As a daily Apple Insider reader it is a thrill to see our app used in an article here, but I wish Daniel would have actually mentioned the apps by name and provided a link too. :-)

- Chris // www.technomadia.com
post #30 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by radven View Post

As a daily Apple Insider reader it is a thrill to see our app used in an article here, but I wish Daniel would have actually mentioned the apps by name and provided a link too. :-)

That serves no purpose other than advertising. That's not the point.
post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

That serves no purpose other than advertising. That's not the point.

I'm not at all a fan of gratuitous advertising - but linking to a useful tool featured in an article is not advertising, it is a service to readers and saves them having to dig up the link themselves.
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

That serves no purpose other than advertising. That's not the point.

The point is good blogging etiquette and not providing any attribution implies it's your own work.

Notice the AppleInsider.com watermark on the speed chart? That's to keep unscrupulous (but lazy) folks from stealing that chart without some attribution.

Given that the coverage discussion is a significant point of the conclusion the app attribution should be there as the source of the images.

Especially since there is a Verizon vs ATT LTE article on Technomadia's site that DED lifted these two images from.

http://www.technomadia.com/2012/03/v...-lte-networks/

By stripping the captions the DED article also implies the top image is Verizon while the bottom is AT&T. In actuality the top image is LTE only and the bottom is LTE + 4G (HSPA+).

Looks like a nifty app. If I was still traveling a lot I'd get it.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cover...388815949?mt=8

Disclaimer: Before this thread I never even knew of this app or the technoadia website. Nifty lifestyle.
post #33 of 42
What a stupid article, you go into the trouble of point out 3GPP Releases in a chart, then do not tell the reader if the LTE iPad supports Release 8 or Release 9 or both!?!

WHERE IS THE INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING?

Also, why not call out what speed implementations (theoretical) AT&T and T-Mobile support the other two 3G/4G technologies (DC-HSDPA & HSPA+) the new iPad supports?!
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

What a stupid article, you go into the trouble of point out 3GPP Releases in a chart, then do not tell the reader if the LTE iPad supports Release 8 or Release 9 or both!?!

WHERE IS THE INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING?

Also, why not call out what speed implementations (theoretical) AT&T and T-Mobile support the other two 3G/4G technologies (DC-HSDPA & HSPA+) the new iPad supports?!

You think that's bad? Look at the screendump from Postulant and WardC who both display Speedtest.net from a WiFi connection, discussing cellular. I must be missing something here...
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post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

You think that's bad? Look at the screendump from Postulant and WardC who both display Speedtest.net from a WiFi connection, discussing cellular. I must be missing something here...

You certainly seem to be missing something. Only Postulant posted speedtest data, and all but one of the data sets were cellular.
post #36 of 42
I'm a loyal AT&T customer, but I opted for the Verizon iPad.

Verizon has LTE coverage around where I live, and AT&T does not. Though, that isn't the main reason I went with Verizon.

The 2 (*3) main reason are:
1) Free hotspot tethering - I'm a light user, and it allows me to drop it from my AT&T iPhone. I don't use much data, so it's a waste to pay for it on a monthly basis. Over a year, this savings alone will more than pay for the $130 premium to buy the 4G-capable iPad (more like 6-7 months). I'll probably only use it for a couple of months out of the year. If/when AT&T follows suit, this will narrow the deciding factors between iPad 4G models.

AT&T iPhone tethering: $20 x 12 months = $240 annually. Factoring in the $130 iPad 4G premium, for the same $240, that still leaves me 5-1/2 months of $20/month iPad data plan, which I really doubt I'll use.

Until carriers stop charging extra to add a feature to use the data I'm already paying for (hopefully Verizon's move with the new iPad paves the way), this will be my long-term strategy.

2) For $5 more at the baseline data plan, Verizon offers 750MB more data. Granted, at the $30 level, AT&T offers 1GB more than Verizon, but I don't foresee my needs being that much. AT&T and Verizon may eventually adjust their deficient plans to mirror the better that each offers at those given levels. This could contribute more to LTE coverage (if AT&T follows with free tethering) as being the deciding factor, or possibly loyalty, as to which iPad 4G model chosen.

*3) Verizon offers LTE in my area - AT&T does not.

So, if AT&T offered free tethering and 1GB of data for $20 per month, that's the model I would've chosen, even though AT&T doesn't have LTE in my area.

If AT&T makes those changes by next year when the next iPad comes, that's probably the iPad model I'll get. Until then, Verizon's offering the better deal for me.

IF (big IF) AT&T starts allowing customers to use tethering without charging extra (I don't need the 2GB of extra data for that $20), I'll no longer have the need for a cellular data iPad - saving even more money by buying the WiFi-only model. GPS, the other included feature on the 4G iPad, isn't enough of an extra benefit for the cost, if I don't need the data connection.
post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

You certainly seem to be missing something. Only Postulant posted speedtest data, and all but one of the data sets were cellular.

My bad, only Postulant. But why has he displaying 'iPad' with the WiFi icon instead of the carrier? This makes no sense as the article discusses the difference between AT&T and Verizon...
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post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

My bad, only Postulant. But why has he displaying 'iPad' with the WiFi icon instead of the carrier? This makes no sense as the article discusses the difference between AT&T and Verizon...

The WiFi icon in the upper left corner is only displaying what he was connected to when he took the screenshot of the SpeedTest results page.

The first column in the results page lists the type. All the icons, except for the last one show a cellular connection icon. The second category shows the date and time of the test.

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post #39 of 42
Thanks Solipsism, guess I need glasses after all. I've been procrastinating this for quite some time, perhaps a '2X' screendump would've saved me the embarrassment.
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post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by WardC View Post

Ahem. I have AT&T and their LTE is nothing short of great. And I am in Fort Worth. I would take AT&T over Verizon anyday.

Uh...yeah....isn't that where ATT is based...DFW? Well duhhhhhh is works great there.

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